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jerryking : sensors   70

Roger McNamee on how to tame Big Tech
February 7, 2019 | Financial Times | Roger McNamee.

Government intervention of this kind is a first step on the path to resolving the privacy issues that result from the architecture, business models and culture of internet platforms. But privacy is not the only problem we must confront. Internet platforms are transforming our economy and culture in unprecedented ways. We do not even have a vocabulary to describe this transformation, which complicates the challenge facing policymakers....Google, Facebook and other internet platforms use data to influence or manipulate users in ways that create economic value for the platform, but not necessarily for the users themselves. In the context of these platforms, users are not the customer. They are not even the product. They are more like fuel.....Google, Facebook and the rest now have economic power on the scale of early 20th-century monopolists such as Standard Oil. What is unprecedented is the political power that internet platforms have amassed — power that they exercise with no accountability or oversight, and seemingly without being aware of their responsibility to society......When capitalism functions properly, government sets and enforces the rules under which businesses and citizens must operate. Today, however, corpor­ations have usurped this role. Code and algorithms have replaced the legal system as the limiter on behaviour. Corporations such as Google and Facebook behave as if they are not accountable to anyone. Google’s seeming disdain for regulation by the EU and Facebook’s violations of the spirit of its agreement with the US FTC over user consent are cases in point......AI promises to be revolutionary. That said, it will not necessarily be a force for good. The problem is the people who create AI. They are human...McNamee recommends two areas of emphasis: regulation and innovation. As for the former, the most important requirement is to create and enforce standards that require new technology to serve the needs of those who use it and society as a whole. ...... The IoT requires our approval. Do not give it until vendors behave responsibly. Demand that policymakers take action to protect public health, democracy, privacy, innovation and the economy.
accountability  Alexa  antitrust  artificial_intelligence  biases  Big_Tech  consent  dark_side  Facebook  Google  Industrial_Internet  monopolies  personal_data  platforms  political_power  privacy  Roger_McNamee  sensors  surveillance  unintended_consequences 
february 2019 by jerryking
‘Businesses Will Not Be Able to Hide’: Spy Satellites May Give Edge From Above
Jan. 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By Cade Metz.

In October, the Chinese province of Guangdong — the manufacturing center on the southern coast that drives 12 percent of the country’s economy — stopped publishing a monthly report on the health of its local factories.

For five consecutive months, this key economic index had shown a drop in factory production as the United States applied billions of dollars in tariffs on Chinese exports. Then, amid an increasingly bitter trade war between the United States and China, the government authorities in Beijing shut the index down.

A small start-up in San Francisco began rebuilding the index, lifting information from photos and infrared images of Guangdong’s factories captured by satellites orbiting overhead. The company, SpaceKnow, is now selling this information to hedge funds, banks and other market traders looking for an edge.

High-altitude surveillance was once the domain of global superpowers. Now, a growing number of start-ups are turning it into a business, aiming to sell insights gleaned from cameras and other sensors installed on small and inexpensive “cube satellites.”..... satellite analysis will ultimately lead to more efficient markets and a better understanding of the global economy.....as well...as a check on the world’s companies and governments....use satellite imagery to track everything from illegal mining and logging operations to large-scale home demolitions. .....All of this is being driven by a drop in the cost of building, launching and operating satellites. Today, a $3 million satellite that weighs less than 10 pounds can capture significantly sharper images than a $300 million, 900-pound satellite built in the late 1990s. That allows companies to put up dozens of devices, each of which can focus on a particular area of the globe or on a particular kind of data collection. As a result, more companies are sending more satellites into orbit, and these satellites are generating more data.

And recent advances in artificial intelligence allow machines to analyze this data with greater speed and accuracy. “The future is automation, with humans only looking at the very interesting stuff,” ......The start-ups buy their data from a growing number of satellite operators, and they build the automated systems that analyze the data, pinpointing objects like cars, buildings, mines and oil tankers in high-resolution photos and other images........What began with satellite cameras is rapidly expanding to infrared sensors that detect heat; “hyperspectral” sensors that identify minerals, vegetation and other materials; and radar scanners that can build three-dimensional images of the landscape below.....
artificial_intelligence  automation  competitive_advantage  indices  imagery  informational_advantages  infrared  insights  reconnaissance  satellites  sensors  slight_edge  surveillance  trade_wars 
january 2019 by jerryking
Vacuums that suck up data fuel privacy concerns
August 16, 2017 | Financial Times | by Aliya Ram.

............Larger questions are being asked. As investors plough money into artificial intelligence (AI) and robots infiltrate deeper into people’s homes, concerns have grown that data-sharing between different technology groups could open the door to unknowable and uncontrollable privacy infringements.

The concern is that technological advances have far outstripped sluggish developments in privacy law and regulation, allowing companies to monetize the most intimate information about how people live and giving governments more opportunities for surveillance.

IRobot has sold 18m home robots around the world and its Roomba vacuum cleaners connect with Amazon and Google’s smart assistants so customers can control them with voice commands. Although it does not sell data, any plans to do so in future could create significant new revenue streams......Consumers will also have the right to be forgotten and to withdraw their consent, which could make things complicated for companies that want to share data with third parties.....“Smart-home appliances and devices are in a privileged position as they are placed at one’s home. These devices are increasingly equipped with motion, environment sensors, and with the ability to communicate with remote servers or other devices — there are a great deal of privacy risks here that must be managed.”
iRobots  privacy  home_appliances  personal_data  mapping  smart_homes  sensors  Roomba  artificial_intelligence  robotics  customer_data 
august 2017 by jerryking
Technology, Media & Telecommunications Predictions 2017 |
Indoor mapping 101

Googled: "retail space" headwinds "indoor mapping".

Also, 17 best images about Retail Tech on Pinterest
Deloitte  management_consulting  location_based_services  navigation  mapping  beacons  sensors 
july 2017 by jerryking
Toronto's smart thermostat startup Ecobee gets $35-million funding boost - The Globe and Mail
ALICJA SIEKIERSKA
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Aug. 22, 2016

A key part of Ecobee's growth strategy includes partnering Ecobee with high-tech home automation systems, including Apple’s HomeKit and Amazon Echo, which uses the company’s Alexa voice-activated artificial intelligence program. These smart home technologies allow users to control such things as lighting, appliances, security, heating and cooling using the Internet.

Ecobee was the first WiFi thermostat system to be compatible with Amazon Echo.
Ecobee  start_ups  thermostats  sensors  Amazon_Echo  Alexa  smart_homes  home_automation  voice_interfaces  artificial_intelligence  funding  Wi-Fi  Toronto 
august 2016 by jerryking
U.S. Textile Industry Turns to Tech as Gateway to Revival - The New York Times
By STEVE LOHR APRIL 1, 2016
...a functional fabrics project represents “the future of apparel.”..The broad linking of government, universities and corporations to both advance research and develop new markets is a model advocated in a new book, “The New ABCs of Research: Achieving Breakthrough Collaborations” (Oxford University Press), by Ben Shneiderman, a professor of computer science at the University of Maryland. In an interview, Mr. Shneiderman called the advanced fabrics project “a well-crafted plan.”
textiles  fabrics  sensors  technology  Steve_Lohr  books  innovation  apparel  renewal  revitalization 
april 2016 by jerryking
Learning to Engineer a Better Brisket - The New York Times
JULY 18, 2015 | NYT | By CLAIRE MARTIN .

They began by analyzing smokers on the market, focusing on Big Green Egg, a popular one with a ceramic cooking chamber. They evaluated the extra-large version, which costs $1,200. “We went through the patent of the Big Green Egg and just completely dissected it,” Mr. Parker said. “Where’s the opportunity here? Where’s the weakness here?”

They built computer models of Big Green Egg, of the brisket and, eventually, of their own smoker. They ran hundreds of computer simulations, and they learned that maintaining a precise, steady cooking temperature is crucial to evenly breaking down the meat’s collagen, tenderizing it. Several students spent their spring break taking a crash course in ceramics at the Harvard Ceramic Studio to build two prototypes of the smoker.

During the smoking sessions, the students attached sensors to the cooking surfaces and collected smoke particles and airflow data. They also inserted thermal imaging devices and probes into the brisket. “It was a heavily instrumented piece of meat,” Mr. Parker said. “It looked like it was in an intensive care unit.”

The final design was a 300-pound ceramic smoker with an hourglass shape that was inspired by power plant cooling towers. An internal computer controls fans that blow oxygen into the fire; it calculates whether the fire needs more or less oxygen and communicates the smoker’s temperature to a smartphone app. Refueling most other smokers requires opening the top and inserting more charcoal and wood chips, which destabilizes the temperature.

A chute on the side of the Harvard smoker lets the chef add more fuel without disrupting its internal temperature. Sensors gauge fuel levels, the temperature of the cooking surface and the weight of the food being smoked, and transmit that information to the app.
Harvard  students  Colleges_&_Universities  patents  competitive_intelligence  entrepreneurship  design  problem_solving  BBQ  engineering  Stanford  cured_and_smoked  beef  sensors 
july 2015 by jerryking
GE, Cisco flex major muscle in trend toward 'Industrial Internet' - The Globe and Mail
DAVID MILSTEAD
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 05, 2015

What GE did, says William Blair & Co. analyst Nicholas Heymann, is write software to collect data from its equipment – from locomotives to jet engines – and develop algorithms that help its customers make better plans, like a railway predicting where to add capacity based on port traffic, or where an airline should develop a hub for travel in 2020....Cisco, the global leader in the routers that allow computer networks to communicate, has spent $1-billion setting up six global “Internet of Everything” data centres and committed $100-million to an innovation fund. It’s promoting app development in developer communities and is working to create technical standards for the industry. It’s deployed Internet of Things offerings at several major customers, including Shell and Harley-Davidson,
sensors  Industrial_Internet  GE  Cisco  algorithms  predictive_analytics 
june 2015 by jerryking
The Sensor-Rich, Data-Scooping Future - NYTimes.com
APRIL 26, 2015 | NYT | By QUENTIN HARDY.

Sensor-rich lights, to be found eventually in offices and homes, are for a company that will sell knowledge of behavior as much as physical objects....The Internet will be almost fused with the physical world. The way Google now looks at online clicks to figure out what ad to next put in front of you will become the way companies gain once-hidden insights into the patterns of nature and society.

G.E., Google and others expect that knowing and manipulating these patterns is the heart of a new era of global efficiency, centered on machines that learn and predict what is likely to happen next.

“The core thing Google is doing is machine learning,” Eric Schmidt....The great data science companies of our sensor-packed world will have experts in arcane reaches of statistics, computer science, networking, visualization and database systems, among other fields. Graduates in those areas are already in high demand.

Nor is data analysis just a question of computing skills; data access is also critically important. As a general rule, the larger and richer a data set a company has, the better its predictions become. ....an emerging area of computer analysis known as “deep learning” will blow away older fields.

While both Facebook and Google have snapped up deep-learning specialists, Mr. Howard said, “they have far too much invested in traditional computing paradigms. They are the equivalent of Kodak in photography.” Echoing Mr. Chui’s point about specialization, he said he thought the new methods demanded understanding of specific fields to work well.

It is of course possible that both things are true: Big companies like Google and Amazon will have lots of commodity data analysis, and specialists will find niches. That means for most of us, the answer to the future will be in knowing how to ask the right kinds of questions.
sensors  GE  GE_Capital  Quentin_Hardy  data  data_driven  data_scientists  massive_data_sets  machine_learning  automated_reasoning  predictions  predictive_analytics  predictive_modeling  layer_mastery  core_competencies  Enlitic  deep_learning  niches  patterns  analog  insights  latent  hidden  questions  Google  Amazon  aftermath  physical_world  specialization  consumer_behavior  cyberphysical  arcane_knowledge  artificial_intelligence  test_beds 
april 2015 by jerryking
IBM to Invest $3 Billion in Sensor-Data Unit - WSJ
March 31, 2015 | WSJ | By DON CLARK. Can CBC get good at communicating the final product on behalf of clients of Pelmorex. So CBC considers supplying the communications platform?

IBM plans to invest $3 billion over four years on a new business helping customers gather and analyze the flood of data from sensor-equipped devices and smartphones.... IBM announced that it is forming an alliance with the Weather Company, which owns the Weather Channel and other information providers. The two companies plan jointly to exploit data about weather conditions to help businesses make better decisions....the centerpiece of IBM's new business unit is a collection of online software called IoT Foundation that runs on IBM’s existing cloud services and allows customers and partners to create new applications and enhance existing ones with real-time data and analysis....IBM is betting that correlating dissimilar kinds of data will yield the highest value. “It’s essential to federate information from multiple sources,” said Bob Picciano, IBM’s senior VP of analytics.... the Weather Channel serves up 700,000 weather forecasts a second. It already sells data to a range of customers in agriculture, transportation and other industries that rely on weather.

But the opportunities have expanded, Mr. Kenny said, as weather sensors installed in many more places have contributed to more timely, localized forecasts. The added detail helps farmers predict more precisely, for example, where hail could impact their fields, Mr. Kenny said.

The Weather Company is turning to IBM, he said, because of its software expertise and relationships with customers in many industries.
sensors  IBM  weather  massive_data_sets  data  data_driven  analytics  Industrial_Internet  smartphones  cloud_computing 
march 2015 by jerryking
They’re Tracking When You Turn Off the Lights - WSJ - WSJ
By ELIZABETH DWOSKIN
Oct. 20, 2014

Tech companies have used the technologies and techniques collectively known as big data to make business decisions and shape their customers’ experience. Now researchers are bringing big data into the public sphere, aiming to improve quality of life, save money, and understand cities in ways that weren’t possible only a few years ago....Municipal sensor networks offer big opportunities, but they also carry risks. In turning personal habits into digital contrails, the technology may tempt authorities to misuse it. While academics aim to promote privacy and transparency, some worry that the benefits of big data could be lost if the public grows wary of being monitored... Anthony Townsend, author of the book “Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia.”...The goal isn’t to sell products or spy on people, the academics say, but to bolster quality of life and knowledge of how cities function
cities  massive_data_sets  sensors  urban  privacy  smart_cities  predictive_analytics  books  quality_of_life  customer_experience  open_data  community_collaboration  white_hats 
october 2014 by jerryking
Businesses Are Turning to Beacons, and It’s Going to Be O.K. - NYTimes.com
OCT. 15, 2014 |NYT | Molly Wood.

The point of the devices is to send a specific signal, using low-energy Bluetooth, to phones that come into proximity, as long as those phones are running apps that can respond to the beacon. Those codes then set off an action on the phone, like a coupon, a reminder, a reward or just information. A beacon at the gates of a baseball stadium could open a map to the user’s seat and offer a beer or hot dog coupon.
sensors  beacons  location_based_services  advertising  mobile_applications  Bluetooth  digital_footprints  proximity  stadiums  arenas  mapping  wayfinding 
october 2014 by jerryking
G.E. Opens Its Big Data Platform - NYTimes.com
By QUENTIN HARDY OCTOBER 9, 2014

Next year, G.E. plans to connect this big data product, called Predix, to machines made by other companies. It is also establishing a means for companies to build and deploy their own customized software applications on Predix. Part of that approach involves using G.E.’s own modeling software, which helps a customer understand ahead of time whether making the software is justified by anticipated cost savings.

If successful, the GE analysis platform will likely touch tens of millions of devices around the globe. Already, Cisco has agreed to put Predix software inside its networking products, starting with a specialized computer router for harsh environments like oil fields. Intel has developed a reference architecture that integrates Intel processors with the GE software.

Softbank, Verizon and Vodaphone have agreed to provide means of wireless connectivity to devices with the software. GE already has a deal like that with AT&T, which means the system could be used across much of the globe.
GE  massive_data_sets  sensors  Industrial_Internet  platforms 
october 2014 by jerryking
How the big-data revolution can help design ideal cities - The Globe and Mail
DAVE MCGINN
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Sep. 24 2014

The big-data revolution faces two key challenges, both concerning the collection of information.

First, as is always the case when it comes to monitoring individuals and collecting details about their lives, is privacy. Second, there is the issue of using that data responsibly....Once municipalities have that consent, there is then the issue of harmonizing data sets in order to gain a fuller picture of issues. For instance, if a municipality wants to understand water-consumption levels, it helps to know how they track weather patterns.

Many cities are still struggling to understand how to use big data, but it promises to be a hugely important urban-planning tool.
algorithms  IBM  real-time  urban  sensors  municipalities  massive_data_sets  cities  data  decision_making  privacy  urban_planning  open_data 
september 2014 by jerryking
What Cars Did for Today's World, Data May Do for Tomorrow's - NYTimes.com
August 10, 2014 | NYT | Quentin Hardy.

General Electric plans to announce Monday that it has created a “data lake” method of analyzing sensor information from industrial machinery in places like railroads, airlines, hospitals and utilities. G.E. has been putting sensors on everything it can for a couple of years, and now it is out to read all that information quickly.

The company, working with an outfit called Pivotal, said that in the last three months it has looked at information from 3.4 million miles of flights by 24 airlines using G.E. jet engines. G.E. said it figured out things like possible defects 2,000 times as fast as it could before.....Databricks, that uses new kinds of software for fast data analysis on a rental basis. Databricks plugs into the one million-plus computer servers inside the global system of Amazon Web Services, and will soon work inside similar-size megacomputing systems from Google and Microsoft....If this growing ecosystem of digital collection, shipment and processing is the new version of cars and highways, what are the unexpected things, the suburbs and fast-food joints that grew from cars and roads?

In these early days, businesses like Uber and Airbnb look like challengers to taxi fleets and hotels. They do it without assets like cars and rooms, instead coordinating data streams about the location of people, cars, and bedrooms. G.E. makes engines, but increasingly it coordinates data about the performance of engines and the location of ground crews. Facebook uses sensor data like location information from smartphones
Quentin_Hardy  data  data_driven  AWS  asset-light  massive_data_sets  resource_allocation  match-making  platforms  resource_management  orchestration  ecosystems  GE  sensors  unexpected  unforeseen  Databricks  Uber  Airbnb  data_coordination  instrumentation_monitoring  efficiencies 
august 2014 by jerryking
Tachyus, a Data Start-Up for Oil Industry, Raises $6 Million From Founders Fund - NYTimes.com
By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED APRIL 10, 2014

Tachyus has been developing hardware and software to gather information wirelessly about various aspects of oil production, tracking production using iPads or a web app. The company’s products are in the process of being tested by prospective customers.

Mr. Sloss declined to comment on other financial details of the financing round, including the company’s valuation. But he said that Tachyus planned to use the money to enlarge its team to 30 to 40 people over the next two and a half years.

“Despite exciting advancements in renewable energy, fossil fuels will continue to drive the world’s energy supply for decades, and doing more with these limited resources is incredibly important,” Scott Nolan, a partner at Founders Fund, said in a statement. “Tachyus’s work in bringing a new level of operational intelligence to the oil and gas industry represents a huge opportunity on multiple levels.”
oil_industry  massive_data_sets  sensors  data  analytics  start_ups  Tachyus  Stanford  alumni  mobile_applications 
june 2014 by jerryking
Apple's Latest Offering Explores the Great Indoors - WSJ
By DAISUKE WAKABAYASHI, ELIZABETH DWOSKIN and GREG BENSINGER CONNECT
June 1, 2014
Apple  location_based_services  sensors  beacons  iBeacons  indoors 
june 2014 by jerryking
The Abundance Builders | World Future Society
July 0-August 2012 | The Futurist | By Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler.
sensors  Industrial_Internet  abundance 
may 2014 by jerryking
M.I.T.'s Alex Pentland: Measuring Idea Flows to Accelerate Innovation - NYTimes.com - NYTimes.com
April 15, 2014 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR.

Alex Pentland --“Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread — The Lesson From a New Science.”

Mr. Pentland has been identified with concepts — and terms he has coined — related to the collection and interpretation of all that data, like “honest signals” and “reality mining.” His descriptive phrases are intended to make his point that not all data in the big data world is equal....Reality mining, for example, examines the data about what people are actually doing rather than what they are looking for or saying. Tracking a person’s movements during the day via smartphone GPS signals and credit-card transactions, he argues, are far more significant than a person’s web-browsing habits or social media comments....Central to the concept of social physics is the ability to measure communication and transactions as never before. Then, that knowledge about the flow of ideas can be used to accelerate the pace of innovation.

The best decision-making environment, Mr. Pentland says, is one with high levels of both “engagement” and “exploration.” Engagement is a measure of how often people in a group communicate with each other, sharing social knowledge. Exploration is a measure of seeking out new ideas and new people.

A golden mean is the ideal....[traders] with a balance of diversity of ideas in their trading network — engagement and exploration — had returns that were 30 percent ahead of isolated traders and well ahead of the echo chamber traders, too....The new data and measurement tools, he writes, allow for a “God’s eye view” of human activity. And with that knowledge, he adds, comes the potential to engineer better decisions in a “data-driven society.”
Alex_Pentland  books  cross-pollination  curiosity  data_scientists  data_driven  decision_making  massive_data_sets  MIT  Mydata  sensors  social_physics  Steve_Lohr  idea_generation  heterogeneity  ideas  intellectual_diversity  traders  social_data  signals  echo_chambers 
april 2014 by jerryking
New software allows insurers to track driving habits and personalize premiums - The Globe and Mail
OMAR EL AKKAD

The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Aug. 19 2013,

The ability to monitor and adapt to the behaviour of individual customers, for example, was part of the rationale for last month’s announcement by Loblaw Cos. Ltd. that it will acquire Shoppers Drug Mart Corp. for $12.4-billion. Shoppers’ Optimum loyalty program will give Loblaw purchasing information on some 10 million customers.
Omar_el_Akkad  telematics  insurance  personalization  massive_data_sets  pattern_recognition  data_mining  sensors  meat_space  SAP  Shoppers  loyalty_management  Loblaws 
january 2014 by jerryking
You don’t want your privacy: Disney and the meat space data race — Tech News and Analysis
By John Foreman, MailChimp
Jan. 18, 2014

meat space is an internet-first way of viewing the world.

The research questions that might be answered with this type of tracking data are endless:

What menu items served at breakfast at the resort hotel restaurants will result in the longest stay at the park?
Do we detect an influx of park-goers into the bathrooms for long stays on the toilet? Perhaps they all ate at the same place, and we can cut off a foodborne illness problem before it gets worse.
Is there a roller coaster that’s correlated with early park departure or a high incidence of bathroom visits? That means less money in the park’s pockets. How might that coaster be altered?
Is there a particular ride and food fingerprint for the type of park visitor that’s likely to buy in-park high-dollar merchandise? If so, can we actively get vendors in front of this attendee’s eye by moving hawkers to them at just the right time?
data  privacy  Disney  RFID  sensors  massive_data_sets  data_driven  data_scientists  theme_parks  personalization  tracking  scheduling  queuing  meat_space  digital_first  questions 
january 2014 by jerryking
The Economics of Surveillance - Digits - WSJ
Sep 28, 2012 | WSJ | By Jennifer Valentino-DeVries.

surveillance has crept into people’s lives gradually as computers have become more efficient and cheaper – and as data analysis has become more enticing. The price for businesses to store and use a gigabyte of information for a year dropped from $18.95 in 2005 to $1.68 in 2012, and it’s expected to drop to just 66 cents in 2015, says market research firm IDC....The average price of a cellphone has increased 17% over the past 10 years – but processing capability has increased by 13,000% in that same time, ABI says. This allows phones to do things such as shoot video, get email and locate the user on a map, but it also means the devices store a lot of information about people that can be collected and tracked.

“Nowadays cellphones are sensors,” said says Col. Lisa Shay, a professor of electrical engineering at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point who studies tracking technology. “You’re now carrying a personal sensor with you at all times.”
surveillance  massive_data_sets  privacy  data  sensors  digital_storage  economics 
january 2014 by jerryking
Traders Seek an Edge With High-Tech Snooping - WSJ.com
Dec. 18, 2013 | WSJ | By Michael Rothfeld and Scott Patterson.

A growing industry uses surveillance and data-crunching technology to supply traders with nonpublic information.

Genscape's clients include banks such as Goldman Sachs Group Inc., J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. and Deutsche Bank AG, hedge funds including Citadel LLC and large energy-trading outfits such as Trafigura Beheer BV. Surveillance and analysis of the oil, electricity and natural-gas sectors can run Genscape clients more than $300,000 a year.
surveillance  data_driven  slight_edge  traders  hedge_funds  sleuthing  Genscape  sensors  commodities  corporate_espionage  competitive_intelligence  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  market_research  exclusivity  investment_research  research_methods  LBMA  nonpublic  primary_field_research  banks  Citadel  oil_industry  natural_gas  snooping  alternative_data  informational_advantages  imagery  satellites  infrared  electric_power 
december 2013 by jerryking
Start-Ups Are Mining Hyperlocal Information for Global Insights - NYTimes.com
November 10, 2013 | WSJ | By QUENTIN HARDY

By analyzing the photos of prices and the placement of everyday items like piles of tomatoes and bottles of shampoo and matching that to other data, Premise is building a real-time inflation index to sell to companies and Wall Street traders, who are hungry for insightful data.... Collecting data from all sorts of odd places and analyzing it much faster than was possible even a couple of years ago has become one of the hottest areas of the technology industry. The idea is simple: With all that processing power and a little creativity, researchers should be able to find novel patterns and relationships among different kinds of information.

For the last few years, insiders have been calling this sort of analysis Big Data. Now Big Data is evolving, becoming more “hyper” and including all sorts of sources. Start-ups like Premise and ClearStory Data, as well as larger companies like General Electric, are getting into the act....General Electric, for example, which has over 200 sensors in a single jet engine, has worked with Accenture to build a business analyzing aircraft performance the moment the jet lands. G.E. also has software that looks at data collected from 100 places on a turbine every second, and combines it with power demand, weather forecasts and labor costs to plot maintenance schedules.
start_ups  data  data_driven  data_mining  data_scientists  inflation  indices  massive_data_sets  hyperlocal  Premise  Accenture  GE  ClearStory  real-time  insights  Quentin_Hardy  pattern_recognition  photography  sensors  maintenance  industrial_Internet  small_data 
november 2013 by jerryking
Nest Labs Reinvents the Smoke Alarm - NYTimes.com
October 8, 2013, 9:00 am 2 Comments
Nest Labs Reinvents the Smoke Alarm
By BRIAN X. CHEN
Nest  sensors  Apple  alumni  design  smart_homes  smart_meters 
october 2013 by jerryking
Silicon Valley meets Salinas Valley in partnership to make farming 'smart'
Jun 29, 2013 | Financial Times |
By April Dembosky in Salinas, California

Big data is on its way to the dinner table. Silicon Valley executives are for the first time forming agriculture partner...
Silicon_Valley  fresh_produce  agriculture  California  farming  sensors  innovation  massive_data_sets 
july 2013 by jerryking
The Secret Life of Data in the Year 2020
July-August 2012 | World Future Society Vol. 46, No. 4 |By Brian David Johnson.

A futurist for Intel shows how geotags, sensor outputs, and big data are changing the future. He argues that we need a better understanding of our relationship with the data we produce in order to build the future we want....Data is only useful and indeed powerful when it comes into contact with people.

This brings up some interesting questions and fascinating problems to be solved from an engineering standpoint. When we are architecting these algorithms, when we are designing these systems, how do we make sure they have an understanding of what it means to be human? The people writing these algorithms must have an understanding of what people will do with that data. How will it fit into their lives? How will it affect their daily routine? How will it make their lives better?...the only way to make sense of all this complex information—by viewing data, massive data sets, and the algorithms that really utilize big data as being human. Data doesn’t spring full formed from nowhere. Data is created, generated, and recorded. And the unifying principle behind all of this data is that it was all created by humans. We create the data, so essentially our data is an extension of ourselves, an extension of our humanity.
future  data  algorithms  Intel  sensors  massive_data_sets  storytelling  ethnography  questions  sense-making 
july 2013 by jerryking
Mapping the Future with Big Data
July-August 2013 | World Future Society (Vol. 47, No. 4) |By Patrick Tucker.

The hiker scenario is one that Esri (originally Environmental Systems Research Institute Inc.) demonstrates at conferences, such as its Federal GIS user conference that took place in February. It is, in many ways, a snapshot of the way that statistical data from databases, user data from multiple participants, and social network data from the public will change the nature of rapid decision making in the years ahead. It’s a very big change, and Esri is at the forefront of the way big data and geography will merge in the future....In the nascent era of big data, Esri is poised to become much more significant as we incorporate computerized sensing and broadcasting abilities into our physical environment, creating what is sometimes called an “Internet of things.” Data from sensor networks, RFID tags, surveillance cameras, unmanned aerial vehicles, and geotagged social-media posts all have geographical components to them. After decades of quietly serving the computer mapping and modeling needs of its clients, Esri has suddenly found itself in a new field, using geo-specific data to reveal how businesses, institutions, populations, and entire nations are changing—or being changed by—the physical world, in real time.
future  massive_data_sets  mapping  GIS  predictive_modeling  cyberphysical  tacit_data  crowdsourcing  ESRI  geography  sensors  Industrial_Internet  RFID  meat_space  real-time  location_based_services  LBMA  physical_world 
july 2013 by jerryking
Nike Courts App Developers for FuelBand, Takes a Page From Apple's Playbook - WSJ.com
June 19, 2013 | WSJ | By SHELLY BANJO.

Nike is giving select developers terabytes of data from customers wearing the digital wristband. The company hopes the aggregate data—from the average duration of a run (35 minutes) to how energetic residents of certain cities are (New Yorkers move more than Angelenos)—will lead to apps that make the FuelBand more indispensable to users....Nike's data-sharing venture is part of a larger shift at the Beaverton, Ore., sportswear giant to think more like a technology company. Nike, which reported $24 billion in revenue last year, can no longer just make sneakers and clothing...but also must develop a technology business to better connect with customers who are increasingly glued to smartphones and social media...."The iPhone was successful because people built great apps around it," said Greg Gottesman, managing director at Madrona Venture Group, LLTP -7.41% a Seattle venture capital firm, and a Nike accelerator mentor. "Nike will be more successful owning a platform, rather than just a product."...Nike created a new digital sports division in 2010 to build a more vigorous technology platform around its Nike Plus offerings, placing it in a separate building on its headquarters campus to avoid the company's bureaucracy.

The results so far include the FuelBand, an exercise training game for the Xbox, and basketball shoes with built-in pressure sensors that measure how high players jump.

"Are we a traditional technology company? No, but we're finding a place where technology plays a relevant role in bringing innovation to every athlete in the world," Mr. Olander said.
software_developers  mobile_applications  Nike  Shelly_Banjo  sports  sportswear  sensors  incubators  start_ups  data_driven  platforms  ecosystems  connected_devices  wearables  accelerators  athletes_&_athletics  playbooks 
june 2013 by jerryking
Max Levchin talks about data, sensors and the plan for his new startup(s) — Tech News and Analysis
Jan. 30, 2013 | GigaOm |By Om Malik.

“The world of real things is very inefficient: slack resources are abundant, so are the companies trying to rationalize their use. Über, AirBnB, Exec, GetAround, PostMates, ZipCar, Cherry, Housefed, Skyara, ToolSpinner, Snapgoods, Vayable, Swifto…it’s an explosion! What enabled this? Why now? It’s not like we suddenly have a larger surplus of black cars than ever before.

Examine the DNA of these businesses: resource availability and demand requests — highly analog, as this is about cars, drivers, and passengers — is captured at the edge, automatically where possible, then transmitted and stored, then processed centrally. Requests are queued at the smart center, and a marketplace/auction is used to allocate them, matches are made and feedback is given in real time.

A key revolutionary insight here is not that the market-based distribution of resources is a great idea — it is the digitalization of analog data, and its management in a centralized queue to create amazing new efficiencies.”
massive_data_sets  data  Max_Levchin  radical_ideas  sensors  start_ups  incubators  San_Francisco  sharing_economy  analog  efficiencies  meat_space  data_coordination  match-making  platforms  Om_Malik  resource_management  underutilization  resource_allocation  auctions  SMAC_stack  algorithms  digitalization 
february 2013 by jerryking
Push to exploit an ocean of information
Richard Waters Source: The Financial Times. (Dec. 10, 2012): News: p19

Like anticipating film demand and judging the effectiveness of window displays, much of the effort in the field of big data analytics is aimed at making existing companies more effective. Designing products, setting optimal prices and reaching the best prospects among potential customers are turning into data-driven exercises.

But it is also throwing up disruptive new businesses. Companies set up from scratch have the chance to draw on public streams of digital data to enter markets that were once closed to incumbents with long-established customer relationships and proprietary information. And such businesses come without the legacy technology platforms, entrenched business processes and cultural norms that make it hard for big groups to change.

"Even if you're not a bank or a healthcare company, you can play in banking or healthcare," says James Manyika, director at McKinsey's research arm.
massive_data_sets  Quantifind  Hollywood  Climate_Corporation  sensors  Euclid_Analytics  Kabbage  Factual  disruption  start_ups  McKinsey  data_driven  new_businesses  large_companies  open_data  legacy_players  digital_disruption  customer_relationships  legacy_tech  cultural_norms  Richard_Waters 
february 2013 by jerryking
International: Mining the urban data
Nov 21st 2012 | The Economist | Ludwig Siegele: deputy international editor, The Economist from The World In 2013 print edition
cities  urban  data  smartphones  smart_cities  London  Singapore  sensors  mit  SENSEable  exhaust_data  optimization  real-time 
january 2013 by jerryking
Big Data: Rise of the Machines
December 31, 2012 | NYTimes.com | By STEVE LOHR.

What is different between "analytics" and "Big Data"? Data volumes have been steadily increasing for decades, Mr. Davenport noted, though the pace has accelerated sharply in the Internet age. “More than the amount of data itself, the unstructured data from the Web and sensors is a much more salient feature of what is being called Big Data,” he said.

I also asked David B. Yoffie, a technology and competitive strategy expert at Harvard, who is not part of the Big Data crowd, what he thought. The Internet, he observed, has been a mainstream technology for 15 years, and so has the ability to monitor and mine Web browsing behavior and online communications, even if those skills are much improved now.

Still, Mr. Yoffie is most impressed by the rapid spread of low-cost sensors that make it possible to monitor all kinds of physical objects, from fruit shipments (sniffing for signs of spoilage) to jet engines (tracking wear to predict when maintenance is needed).

“The ubiquity of sensors is new,” Mr. Yoffie said. “The sensors make it possible to get data we never had before.”

Machine-generated sensor data will be become a far larger portion of the Big Data world, according to a recent report by IDC. The research report, “The Digital Universe in 2020,” published in December, traces data trends from 2005-20. One of its forecasts is that machine-generated data will increase to 42 percent of all data by 2020, up from 11 percent in 2005.

“It’s all those sensors, the Internet of Things data,” said Jeremy Burton, an executive vice president at EMC, which sponsored the IDC report.

The implication is that Big Data technology will steadily move beyond the consumer Internet.
massive_data_sets  Steve_Lohr  Thomas_Davenport  unstructured_data  Industrial_Internet  David_Yoffie  data  saliencies  sensors  analytics 
january 2013 by jerryking
G.E. Looks to Industry for the Next Digital Disruption - NYTimes.com
By STEVE LOHR
Published: November 23, 2012

G.E. resides in a different world from the consumer Internet. But the major technologies that animate Google and Facebook are also vital ingredients in the industrial Internet — tools from artificial intelligence, like machine-learning software, and vast streams of new data. In industry, the data flood comes mainly from smaller, more powerful and cheaper sensors on the equipment.

Smarter machines, for example, can alert their human handlers when they will need maintenance, before a breakdown. It is the equivalent of preventive and personalized care for equipment, with less downtime and more output.... Today, G.E. is putting sensors on everything, be it a gas turbine or a hospital bed. The mission of the engineers in San Ramon is to design the software for gathering data, and the clever algorithms for sifting through it for cost savings and productivity gains. Across the industries it covers, G.E. estimates such efficiency opportunities at as much as $150 billion.

Some industrial Internet projects are already under way. First Wind, an owner and operator of 16 wind farms in America, is a G.E. customer for wind turbines. It has been experimenting with upgrades that add more sensors, controls and optimization software.

The new sensors measure temperature, wind speeds, location and pitch of the blades. They collect three to five times as much data as the sensors on turbines of a few years ago, said Paul Gaynor, chief executive of First Wind. The data is collected and analyzed by G.E. software, and the operation of each turbine can be tweaked for efficiency. For example, in very high winds, turbines across an entire farm are routinely shut down to prevent damage from rotating too fast. But more refined measurement of wind speeds might mean only a portion of the turbines need to be shut down. In wintry conditions, turbines can detect when they are icing up, and speed up or change pitch to knock off the ice.

Upgrades on 123 turbines on two wind farms have so far delivered a 3 percent increase in energy output, about 120 megawatt hours per turbine a year. That translates to $1.2 million in additional revenue a year from those two farms, Mr. Gaynor said.

“It’s not earthshaking, but it is meaningful,” he said. “These are real commercial investments for us that make economic sense now.” ...
breakdowns  GE  Industrial_Internet  disruption  Steve_Lohr  sensors  artificial_intelligence  machine_learning  digital_disruption  downtime 
november 2012 by jerryking
Using 'Big Data' to Fill Potholes and End Traffic Jams - WSJ.com
June 11, 2012 | WSJ | By SHIRA OVIDE

Tapping 'Big Data' to Fill Potholes
Start-Ups Help States and Municipalities Track Effects of Car Speeds, Other Variables on Traffic.

The New Jersey center offers a glimpse at the power of "big data," a term for techniques to gather reams of computerized information points, analyze them and spit out patterns, often in easy-to-understand visuals like maps or charts. While some industries have used big-data methods for years, what's new is the massive scale of data being generated now thanks to the proliferation of networked gadgets like mobile phones and the growing power of computers to store and make sense of data quickly and more cheaply.
municipalities  massive_data_sets  New_Jersey  sensors  traffic_congestion 
june 2012 by jerryking
Fujitsu Helps Farmers 'Cloud Compute' - WSJ.com
January 18, 2011 | WSJ | By DAISUKE WAKABAYASHI

Shinpuku Seika has placed sensors out in its fields to collect readings on temperature, soil and moisture levels. Fujitsu's computers then crunch the data and recommend when to start planting or what crops may be well-suited to a specific field....The significance of the cloud is the farmer doesn't have to build the sytem. The devices connect via wireless network. The internet is already built, the data center is already built. The farmer doesn't have to hire an IT staff and stays focused on farming, now with the help of the technology.
Japan  farming  agriculture  cloud_computing  sensors  GPS  demographic_changes  Japanese 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Internet Gets Physical
By STEVE LOHR
Published: December 17, 2011

The next wave of computing does not step away from the consumer Internet so much as build on it for different uses (posing some of the same sorts of privacy and civil liberties concerns). Software techniques like pattern recognition and machine learning used in Internet searches, online advertising and smartphone apps are also ingredients in making smart devices to manage energy consumption, health care and traffic.
Industrial_Internet  sentiment_analysis  sensors  IBM  GE  Steve_Lohr 
december 2011 by jerryking
The “Post-PC” Era: It’s Real, But It Doesn’t Mean What You Think It Does | Forrester Blogs
May 17, 2011 | Forrester Blogs | by Sarah Rotman Epps who
explains that computing is shifting from: Stationary to ubiquitous.
Contrast the experience of computing on a desktop PC, in one place with a
clear start and finish time, to that of the anytime/anywhere computing
done on a smartphone or tablet. Ubiquitous computing = context-aware
computing, aided by sensors like accelerometers, gyroscopes, and
geolocators in smartphones & tablets.
Formal to casual. Instant-on/always-on computing on smartphones and
tablets fills in-between moments like standing in line or watching TV.

Abstracted to physical. Touchscreens on smartphones and tablets
enable direct physical manipulation of content in two-dimensional space.
Cameras with facial recognition, voice sensors, and motion sensors
(e.g. Microsoft Kinect for Xbox 360) permit a wider range of physical
interaction with devices, where a user’s body and voice become the
controller.
post-PC  Apple  Forrester  smartphones  sensors  on-demand  tablet_computing  pervasive_computing  digital_economy  contextual  facial-recognition 
may 2011 by jerryking
Augmented business;
Nov 6, 2010. | The Economist.Vol. 397, Iss. 8707; pg. 12 |
Anonymous.

The more data that firms collect in their core business, the more they
are able to offer new types of services. 3 trends stand out. First,
since smart systems provide better information, they should lead to
improved pricing and allocation of resources. Second, the integration of
the virtual and the real will speed up the shift from physical goods to
services that has been going on for some time. This also means that
more and more things will be hired instead of bought. Third, economic
value, having migrated from goods to services, will now increasingly
move to data and the algorithms used to analyse them. In fact, data, and
the knowledge extracted from them, may even be on their way to becoming
a factor of production in their own right, just like land, labour and
capital. That will make companies and governments increasingly
protective of their data assets.
sensors  ProQuest  Outsourcing  data_driven  services  augmented_reality  DaaS  factors_of_production  Industrial_Internet  data  algorithms  intangibles  core_businesses  resource_allocation  physical_assets  value_migration 
november 2010 by jerryking
A sea of sensors
Nov 6, 2010 | The Economist. Vol. 397, Iss. 8707; pg. 6 |
Anonymous. The main goal of smart systems is "to close the loop", in
the words of a report on the internet of things published in March by
the McKinsey Global Institute. This means using the knowledge gleaned
from data to optimise and automate all kinds of processes....Such
devices and smartphones are gradually turning people into the sensory
organs of the internet, say John Battelle, boss of Federated Media, an
online advertising agency, and Tim O'Reilly, who heads O'Reilly Media, a
publishing house. "Our cameras, our microphones, are becoming the eyes
and ears of the web," they write in a paper entitled "Web Squared".
ProQuest  sensors  massive_data_sets  crowdsensing  information_overload  Industrial_Internet 
november 2010 by jerryking
Managing Water as Scarcity Looms - WSJ.com
SEPT. 27, 2010 | WSJ | By GERALDINE AMIEL. Suez
Environnement's CEO Taps Opportunities Amid Escalating Global Shortages;
a Particular Thirst for China. As the world's population grows and
migrates to cities, water shortages are happening in places where
scarcity was unthinkable only 5 yrs ago, such as the Spanish coast,...
London,--is described by the U.K. Environment Agency as "seriously water
stressed." And in March 2009, a report by the WEF said the lack of
water would "soon tear into various parts of the global economic system"
and "start to emerge as a headline geopolitical issue."...``on the U.S.
East Coast, "people are used to having water—they don't think further,
they don't think about future generations." Mr. Chaussade prefers
thinking for the long term. His main hobby is planting trees in his
garden and watching them grow, imagining what people will think of them
in 100 yrs. "The garden must be beautiful when you create it,--It must
remain so when you're gone."
water  scarcity  China  Suez  Veolia  CEOs  smart_grid  desalination  imagination  wastewater-treatment  sensors  HBS  gardening  long-term  far-sightedness  unthinkable  geopolitics 
september 2010 by jerryking
Why HP Thinks Sensors Will Lead to The Next Big Wave of Computing - NYTimes.com
By RICHARD MACMANUS of ReadWriteWeb
Published: May 28, 2010 "The basic premise of CeNSE is to create a
worldwide network of sensors that is connected to the Internet, which in
turn creates a feedback loop for objects and people. An example HP
often gives is putting thousands of sensors on a bridge, to measure
vibrations." "HP foresees services arising out of sensor data. If
traffic services were based on sensor data from bridges and roads, then
sensor data would allow companies to "build awareness" and perhaps even
deliver services that people will pay for. Consumers may be willing to
pay for the "best decision" about which route to take to a destination,
he explained. That decision would come from a combination of sensors in
the road and real-time analytics performed by HP, or a company that
processes the data."
HP  sensors  smart_infrastructure  analytics  wireless_networks  Industrial_Internet 
may 2010 by jerryking
Unboxed - Who Says Innovation Belongs to the Small? - NYTimes.com
May 23, 2009 | New York Times | By STEVE LOHR. Technology
trends also contribute to the rising role of large companies. The lone
inventor will never be extinct, but W. Brian Arthur, an economist at the
Palo Alto Research Center, says that as digital technology evolves,
step-by-step innovations are less important than linking all the
sensors, software and data centers in systems.
innovation  size  Steve_Lohr  Clayton_Christensen  large_companies  W._Brian_Arthur  sensors  software  interconnections  Fortune_500  brands  back-office  data_centers  systematic_approaches  systems  systems_integration  Xerox 
october 2009 by jerryking
IBM's Big Push into Business Consulting - BusinessWeek
April 16, 2009 | Business Week | by Steve Hamm

IBM sees rich opportunity to profit if it can help improve productivity
in sectors such as transportation, electric utilities, and health care.
"We're at the beginning of a new wave," says Kern. "We've begun to
instrument the world [with sensors and other devices that collect
information], but now we have to take that data and analyze it."
competingonanalytics  IBM  data_mining  analytics  sensors  Industrial_Internet  productivity  management_consulting 
april 2009 by jerryking
SENSEable City
The real-time city is now real! The increasing deployment of
sensors and hand-held electronics in recent years is allowing a new
approach to the study of the built environment. The way we describe and
understand cities is being radically transformed - alongside the tools
we use to design them and impact on their physical structure. Studying
these changes from a critical point of view and anticipating them is the
goal of the SENSEable City Laboratory, a new research initiative at the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
mit  cities  SENSEable  urban  research  networks  sensors  smart_cities  real-time 
april 2009 by jerryking

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