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jerryking : sentiment_analysis   6

Wall Street’s Insatiable Lust: Data, Data, Data
By BRADLEY HOPE
Updated Sept. 12, 2016

One of his best strategies is to attend the most seemingly mundane gatherings, such as the Association for Healthcare Resource & Materials Management conference in San Diego last year, and the National Industrial Transportation League event in New Orleans.

“I walk the floor, try to talk to companies and get a sense within an industry of who collects data that could provide a unique insight into that industry,” he said.....Data hunters scour the business world for companies that have data useful for predicting the stock prices of other companies. For instance, a company that processes transactions at stores could have market-moving information on how certain products or brands are selling or a company that provides software to hospitals could give insights into how specific medical devices are being used......A host of startups also are trying to make it easier for funds without high-powered data-science staffers to get the same insights. One, called Quandl Inc., based in Toronto, offers a platform that includes traditional market data alongside several “alternative” data....
alternative_data  conferences  data  data_hunting  hedge_funds  insights  investors  exhaust_data  market_moving  medical_devices  mundane  private_equity  Quandl  quants  sentiment_analysis  unconventional  unglamorous  Wall_Street 
september 2016 by jerryking
Twitter Acquires Gnip, Bringing a Valuable Data Service In-House - NYTimes.com - NYTimes.com
April 15, 2014 | NYT | By ASHWIN SESHAGIRI.

In 2010, Gnip was the first company to work with Twitter to gain access to the social network’s so-called fire hose, which contains all publicly available tweets since 2006. Brands, advertisers and, recently, academics could use that stream of data to analyze and parse activity on the social network....Last year, Apple acquired Topsy Labs, a similar provider of data of Twitter activity. The terms of that deal were also not disclosed, though The Wall Street Journal, citing people familiar with the matter, estimated the deal to be worth more than $200 million.

“We believe Gnip has only begun to scratch the surface,” Jana Messerschmidt, Twitter’s vice president of global business development and platform, wrote in a blog post announcing the deal. “Together we plan to offer more sophisticated data sets and better data enrichments, so that even more developers and businesses big and small around the world can drive innovation using the unique content that is shared on Twitter.”
Twitter  Gnip  massive_data_sets  mergers_&_acquisitions  data  data_mining  sentiment_analysis  social_media  social_data 
april 2014 by jerryking
Twitter's Lucrative Data Mining Business - WSJ.com
October 6, 2013 | WSJ | By ELIZABETH DWOSKIN.

Twitter's Data Business Proves Lucrative
Twitter Disclosed It Earned $47.5 Million From Selling Off Information It Gathers

Twitter's data business has rippled across the economy. The site's constant stream of experiences, opinions and sentiments has spawned a vast commercial ecosystem, serving up putative insights to product developers, Hollywood studios, major retailers and—potentially most profitably—hedge funds and other investors....Social-data firms spot trends that it would take a long time for humans to see on their own. The United Nations is using algorithms derived from Twitter to pinpoint hot spots of social unrest. DirecTV DTV +0.99% uses Twitter data as an early-warning system to spot power outages based on customer complaints. Human-resources departments analyze the data to evaluate job candidates....While estimates of the market value of the social-data industry are hard to come by, one research firm, IDC, estimates that the entire "big data" market has grown seven times as quickly as the information technology sector as a whole. It may be valued at $16.9 billion in two years....Each social-data firm boasts proprietary dating-mining tools that go beyond basic keyword searches. Some can zoom in on a subset of people—say, women in a certain ZIP Code—and monitor phrases that show emotion. Then they can create a heat map or a sentiment score that measures how that subset feels about a topic. They have trained natural language processing algorithms to look at slang and broken grammar and to highlight tweets that indicate urgency because of words like "BREAKING."

"We don't just count the volume of these trends. That's naïve," says Nova Spivak, CEO of the Los Angeles-based firm Bottlenose. Rather, his firm looks at the momentum of trends....Many smaller analytics startups are now turning to four companies that Twitter has dubbed "certified data resellers." These brokers, Gnip, Data Sift, Topsy and the Japanese firm NTT Data, 9613.TO -2.04% account for the bulk of Twitter's data revenue. Last year, they paid Twitter monthly fees of about $35.6 million.

Twitter's exponential growth has meant its influence extends well beyond marketing and crisis PR. Nonprofits, human-resource managers and politicians have found Twitter data useful, too.
data  data_mining  Twitter  massive_data_sets  sentiment_analysis  social_media  social_data  trend_spotting  Gnip  Data_Sift  Topsy  NTT_Data  Bottlenose  NLP  hotspots  UN  human_resources  insights  Hollywood  hedge_funds  momentum  product_development 
october 2013 by jerryking
The Internet Gets Physical
By STEVE LOHR
Published: December 17, 2011

The next wave of computing does not step away from the consumer Internet so much as build on it for different uses (posing some of the same sorts of privacy and civil liberties concerns). Software techniques like pattern recognition and machine learning used in Internet searches, online advertising and smartphone apps are also ingredients in making smart devices to manage energy consumption, health care and traffic.
Industrial_Internet  sentiment_analysis  sensors  IBM  GE  Steve_Lohr 
december 2011 by jerryking
For SAS, Asia Offers Risks and Potential - WSJ.com
NOV. 21, 2010 | WSJ| By JASON CHOW. "SAS "uses companies'
historical data to work out their futures."...Q: Where is growth in Asia
coming from? A: We do a lot of work in risk management for banks. We
make sure their risk computations are up-to-date and [help them] with
their anti-money laundering. ...We see a lot of growth from the
pharmaceutical sector. SAS has a tool to analyze clinical trials &
effectiveness of a particular drug. We're seeing more pharmaceutical
drug trials move to Asia, esp. in India....Essentially, anybody who's
got data. And lots of it. Of course, there are things like social-media
analysis that don't require your data. We can tell you what people think
of you or your brand without any data from you. We can search out every
blog & tweet that's been done about you for the last 30 days or
whatever time frame, and tell you how people are thinking of your
brand. We call it sentiment analysis. We're having a hard time keeping
up with customer demand on that product.
SAS  Asian  analytics  social_media  reputation  money_laundering  pharmaceutical_industry  sentiment_analysis  risk-management  historical_data 
november 2010 by jerryking

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