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jerryking : sexual_harassment   29

In a Superstar Economy, a Bull Market in Superstar Harassers
OCT. 31, 2017 | The New York Times | By NOAM SCHEIBER.

In the recent wave of reports of workplace sexual harassment, a recurring theme stands out: the willingness of companies’ supposed overseers to ignore credible allegations in order to retain a perceived star.....in a report on sexual harassment last year, gave those who benefit from it a name: “superstar” harassers. “When the superstar misbehaves, employers may perceive themselves in a quandary,” the report said. “They may be tempted to ignore the misconduct because, the thinking goes, losing the superstar would be too costly.”

Superstar harassers account for a fraction of the harassment allegations in the workplace, but these individuals can have considerable impact. Superstars are able to evade the consequences of their actions for years, and they exert outsize influence over their organizations.........The growth of a superstar economy is reflected in a greater concentration of money and power among those at the top. A generation or two ago, a top worker who was slightly better than his or her peers tended to receive a moderate premium in earnings. Today, with companies operating on a more sweeping scale, that premium is much higher. Top performers only slightly better than their peers tend to make vastly more money.

“It’s really taken off in the last two decades,” Professor Katz of Harvard said. “You see it in broad measures of income, and even in the raw data — the hedge fund manager, finance people, C.E.O. data, top academics, top lawyers.”

In effect, the rest of the economy is becoming more like Hollywood, where a small group of stars have long reaped a huge portion of the rewards. That means more bosses and boards may soon face decisions about whether to stand up to harassers or to overlook their behavior.
sexual_harassment  winner-take-all  superstars  overachievers  workplaces  Hollywood  high-achieving 
october 2017 by jerryking
Unintended Consequences of Sexual Harassment Scandals
OCT. 9, 2017 | The New York Times | Claire Cain Miller @clairecm.

In Silicon Valley, some male investors have declined one-on-one meetings with women, or rescheduled them from restaurants to conference rooms. On Wall Street, certain senior men have tried to avoid closed-door meetings with junior women. And in TV news, some male executives have scrupulously minded their words in conversations with female talent.

An unintended consequence of a season of sex scandals, men describe a heightened caution because of recent sexual harassment cases, and they worry that one accusation, or misunderstood comment, could end their careers. But their actions affect women’s careers, too — potentially depriving them of the kind of relationships that lead to promotions or investments. This is because building genuine relationships with senior people is perhaps the most important contributor to career advancement. In some offices it’s known as having a rabbi; researchers call it sponsorship. Unlike mentors, who give advice and are often formally assigned, sponsors know and respect people enough that they are willing to find opportunities for them, and advocate and fight for them.....sponsors “have to spend some capital and take a risk on the up-and-coming person, and you simply don’t do that unless you know them and trust them.” But these relationships are crucial, she said, for “getting from the middle to the top.”
#MeToo  sponsorships  Claire_Cain_Miller  entertainment_industry  venture_capital  Silicon_Valley  Fox_News  mentoring  sexual_harassment  reputational_risk  workplaces  unintended_consequences  political_capital  gender_gap  personal_risk  relationships  women  deprivations 
october 2017 by jerryking
In House of Murdoch, Sons Set About an Elaborate Overhaul
APRIL 22, 2017 | The New York Times | By BROOKS BARNES and SYDNEY EMBER.

With James and his elder brother, Lachlan, 45, who is the executive chairman of 21st Century Fox, firmly entrenched as their father’s successors, they are now forcibly exerting themselves. Their father remains very involved, but his sons seem determined to rid the company of its roguish, old-guard internal culture and tilt operations toward the digital future. They are working to make the family empire their own, not the one the elder Murdoch created to suit his sensibilities.....The conglomerate, like its competitors, is facing an extremely uncertain future. Consumers are canceling or forgoing cable hookups and instead subscribing to streaming services like Netflix and Hulu, which 21st Century Fox co-owns. The movie business continues to grapple with piracy, rising costs and flat domestic attendance. Fox also has special problems: With competitors getting bigger — AT&T’s $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner being Exhibit A — where does that leave the Murdochs?

“That’s a question I think they asked themselves and moved them to try to buy the rest of Sky,” said Michael Nathanson, an analyst at MoffettNathanson, referring to a pending $14.3 billion deal for 21st Century Fox to take full control of the British satellite TV giant.

At the moment, 21st Century Fox’s portfolio is relatively healthy. Fox News has continued to dominate in the ratings. The FX cable channel has found a steady stream of hits, including “Atlanta” and “The People v. O. J. Simpson.” The Fox broadcast network has struggled to find new must-see shows, but the company’s overseas channels and sports networks are thriving. In its most recent quarter, 21st Century Fox reported income of $856 million, a 27 percent increase from the same period a year earlier.
succession  Rupert_Murdoch  CATV  conglomerates  uncertainty  Netflix  Hulu  James_Murdoch  Lachlan_Murdoch  family-owned_businesses  Bill_O'Reilly  organizational_culture  sexual_harassment  Roger_Ailes  generational_change  digital_media  National_Geographic  CEOs  21st_Century_Fox  mass_media 
april 2017 by jerryking
A farewell to India: false miracles and true inspiration - The Globe and Mail
STEPHANIE NOLEN

DANAPUR, INDIA — The Globe and Mail

Last updated Saturday, Aug. 10 2013,

Poonam carries on. “Girls like us, if we take the opportunity given to us, we can become educated and get those jobs as teachers and nurses. It all depends on what you do with the chance you’re given. It used to be only for those others. Now, we also have that opportunity, if we take it. What used to be possible only for them is possible for us also.”
Stephanie_Nolen  India  women  Dalits  gender_gap  sexual_assault  sexual_harassment  caste_systems 
august 2013 by jerryking
Kleiner Perkins, for Better or Verse - NYTimes.com
July 19, 2012, 12:00 pm5 Comments
Kleiner Perkins, for Better or Verse
By DAVID STREITFELD
Kleiner_Perkins  sexual_harassment  Ellen_Pao  gender_discrimination 
july 2012 by jerryking
Kleiner Loses Bid for Arbitration in Discrimination Case - NYTimes.com
July 20, 2012, 2:30 pm14 Comments
Kleiner Loses Bid for Arbitration in Discrimination Case
By DAVID STREITFELD
Kleiner_Perkins  litigation  sexual_harassment  Ellen_Pao  gender_discrimination  arbitration 
july 2012 by jerryking
A female RCMP officer’s damning indictment of her employer - The Globe and Mail
COLIN FREEZE  AND IAN BAILEY
TORONTO AND VANCOUVER— From Thursday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Nov. 09, 2011
RCMP  sexual_harassment  Octothorpe_Software  hiring 
november 2011 by jerryking

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