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jerryking : shopping_habits   6

Walmart tells investors to expect more risk-taking
October 16, 2018 | Financial Times | Alistair Gray and Pan Kwan Yuk in New York.

Doug McMillon said at an investor meeting on Tuesday that the Arkansas-based company was experimenting with technology ranging from floor-cleaning robots to augmented reality and biometrics as he urged Wall Street to “challenge your thinking about Walmart”.

Walmart superstores have transformed shopping habits and became a dominant force in American retail. The bricks-and-mortar model, however, has been upended in by the rise of ecommerce.

“Looking back, we had a proven model, and we naturally focused on execution. As the numbers grew, we . . . unintentionally became risk averse,” Mr McMillon said at a meeting for investors.

“But today we’re getting to reimagine retail and our business. To do that we take risk — try quite a few things and learn from our failures. That type of behaviour’s in our DNA, and we’re waking up that part of our culture.”.....Online sales, in which Walmart has been investing aggressively as part of its response to Amazon, are expected to increase around 35 per cent for the fiscal 2020 year, compared to the expected 40 per cent for 2019.

Walmart also on Tuesday struck a partnership with Advance Auto Parts, allowing it increase its presence in the car parts business. Under the tie-up the companies will offer home delivery, same-day pick up at each other’s stores and installation of some parts.
Amazon  e-commerce  experimentation  failure  innovation  retailers  risk-taking  Wall_Street  Wal-Mart  augmented_reality  auto_parts  biometrics  bricks-and-mortar  home-delivery  same-day  shopping_habits 
october 2018 by jerryking
Brandy Melville and the rise of the Instabrand
March 17, 2017 | FT via | Evernote Web | by Jo Ellison.

its place in the broader fashion landscape has remained deliberately low-profile. It has never placed an advertisement. It keeps its store numbers low — although it has a busy online business. And, unlike the showy founders of comparable youth-centric fashion brands, such as the now-defunct American Apparel, its executives rarely do press.
Instead, Brandy Melville is an entirely millennial phenomenon, propagated and fed by its mostly pubescent patrons, for whom it holds a cult-like appeal. Most discover it on Instagram, where its 3.9m followers can admire a seemingly never-ending feed (pictured below) of honey-blonde, tawny-limbed beauties skipping around piers, beachfronts, cafés and libraries in teeny-tiny shorts and cute slogan cropped tops.....The social media site launched in 2011 and has been tagging, sharing and enrolling followers ever since: many of its stars are professional models; others are just fangirls who have been picked up as brand ambassadors, picking up hundreds of thousands of their own acolytes in the process.....What’s interesting is how efficiently the brand has communicated its message. While labels have traditionally depended on print campaigns, bricks-and-mortar visibility and custom-built marketing, Brandy Melville’s success has been built on shares and likes alone.
And parents, like me, have been complicit in its success.....quite thrilling to have discovered a brand about which I knew nothing at all, and which never wanted my attention, either. Although it will happily use me as a conduit for cash. Instabrands like this are now popping up all over the retail landscape, and there’ll be more to come as the culture becomes ever more evolved. As a lesson in millennial shopping habits
fashion  brands  girls  retailers  California  millennials  Instagram  social_media  teenagers  bricks-and-mortar  shopping_habits 
march 2017 by jerryking
Using 'remarkable' source of data, startup builds rich customer profiles - The Globe and Mail
Ivor Tossell

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Monday, Jan. 06 2014

RetailGenius, a product from a Toronto startup called Viasense, promises to algorithmically generate customer profiles based on a remarkable source of data: Anonymous location data that’s collected by big mobile carriers, from the passive pings that every single cellphone sends out as it goes through the day.

The data that RetailGenius uses is anonymized – it doesn’t have any way of knowing whose cellphone belongs to who; it simply has a gigantic plot of where thousands of cellphones were at any given time.

“We create a unique identifier between those signals, and we can see those signals move throughout the city,” says Mossab Basir, RetailGenius’ founder. “We can see those changes in your location but we never really know who it is.”

What the product does next is intriguing: Based on some 50 million pieces of location data a day, RetailGenius crunches the numbers to make inferences from where each cellphone spends its time, and generates customer profiles by the thousands.

For instance, if a given cellphone spends the hours between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m. in a single area, it’s a good bet that its owner lives there. If that cellphone spends its working hours downtown five days a week, its owner is probably a daily commuter. And if it visits a given retail store once a week, a picture of its owner’s habits living and shopping habits starts to emerge.

By lumping these inferred profiles together, RetailGenius can give retailers a picture of who walks through their doors. For instance: What are the top 50 postal codes that are represented in their customers? What kind of volumes of customers are arriving at the store? How long do they stay?
data  start_ups  customer_insights  customer_profiling  RetailGenius  location_based_services  massive_data_sets  data_marketplaces  algorithms  Viasense  metadata  postal_codes  inferences  information_sources  anonymized  shopping_habits 
january 2014 by jerryking
Amazon's Greatest Weapon: Jeff Bezos's Paranoia - WSJ.com
Nov. 13, 2013 | WSJ | By Farhad Manjoo.

What could Mr. Bezos possibly have to fear? Impermanence. Mr. Bezos is in an industry, retail sales, in which every innovation is instantly pored over and copied, in which (thanks partly to him) margins are constantly driven to zero, and in which customers are governed by passing fancy and whim. Being online confers fantastic advantages to Amazon, but it also comes at a deep cost: Very little about its business is burned into customers' minds.

Hence, frenzy: Amazon is in a race to embed itself into the fabric of world-wide commerce in a way that would make it indispensable to everyone's shopping habits—and to do so before its rivals wise up to its plans
Amazon  contra-Amazon  e-commerce  Fedex  habits  impermanence  Jeff_Bezos  network_effects  paranoia  retailers  shopping_experience  speed  staying_hungry  tradeoffs  transient  UPS  USPS  whims  shopping_habits 
november 2013 by jerryking

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