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jerryking : shopping_malls   66

Store wars: short sellers expect more pain in US retail
February 26, 2019 | Financial Times | by Alistair Gray in New York.

Short sellers who made big bets against US retailers a couple of years ago had hoped for carnage across the board. No one could compete with the rise and rise of Amazon...which would make life hard for every mall tenant across America.

But after a period in which internet shopping seemed to hit almost every brick-and-mortar retailer, the industry seems to be dividing into winners and losers. Casualties are still piling up: bankruptcies since the turn of the year....Payless Shoes ....Sears, the once dominant department store chain, narrowly avoided outright liquidation.

However, some of the biggest companies e.g. Walmart & Best Buy are reporting their healthiest metrics in years......For short sellers trying to profit from falling share prices, it makes for a perilous environment.

“It’s a slow death by a thousand paper cuts, and not the kind of ‘mall-mageddon’ originally anticipated by that trade,”.....“Retail has been much more volatile than many would have expected. It hasn’t been decidedly one way down.”....an over-reaction in 2017 and that led to pretty nice opportunities [for longs] in 2018,”.....Investors who put money on the demise of retail that summer have lost out in many cases......It was almost as if they [shorts] were acting like no retail real estate space can work,” ....overcapacity doesn’t mean retail real estate is dead.”...Shares in the sector have been volatile in part because investors have had to consider a series of seemingly contradictory data points about the health of both the US consumer and the retail business.....Traditional chains are also trying to take on Amazon by improving their online offerings and making their stores more enticing. Both require hefty investment, although successful examples include Lululemon, which offers yoga lessons in its stores. Shares in the company have tripled since a 2017 low.

“Those who are innovating and investing in ecommerce, marketing and social media tend to be doing well...“The US is still over-stored,” ...Ecommerce meant “more of the store base is not economic. That’s going be a secular pressure for years to come. For those retailers that don’t have a digital strategy, it’s just a matter of time before they fall.”
Amazon  apocalypses  bankruptcies  barbell_effect  bear_markets  bricks-and-mortar  commercial_real_estate  death_by_a_thousand_cuts  department_stores  digital_strategies  e-commerce  innovation  investors  investment_thesis  Lululemon  pain_points  overcapacity  retailers  shopping_malls  short_selling  structural_decline  Wal-Mart 
february 2019 by jerryking
Can tech save bricks and mortar retail? | Financial Times
Alistair Gray in New York

Stores turn to augmented reality, robots and smart mirrors in battle against Amazon
Amazon  augmented_reality  retailers  shopping_malls  robotics 
january 2019 by jerryking
Imagining the Retail Store of the Future
APRIL 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By ELIZABETH PATON.

What will the store of the future look like? Gleaming robots using facial recognition technology to personalize sales pitches to mood or past spending preferences? Voice-activated personal assistants, downloading the availability, color and fit of any and every garment to your smartphone? 3-D printing stations? No checkout counters when you leave? Holographic product displays on the shop floor that change when a customer walks by? Virtual fitting rooms via virtual reality headsets? Drones dropping deliveries in the backyard or on the front steps?.......is this the sort of shopping experience that customers really want?
Scores of leading retailers and fashion brands increasingly say no.........Farfetch — the global online marketplace for independent luxury boutiques — held a daylong event at the Design Museum in London. There, in front of 200 fashion industry insiders and partners, José Neves, the founder of Farfetch, unveiled “The Store of the Future,” a suite of new technologies developed by his company to help brands and boutiques bridge the worlds of online and offline.......A report by Bain suggests that although 70 % of high-end purchases are influenced by online interactions, stores will continue to play a critical role, with 75 % of sales still occurring in a physical location by 2025.

What may change, however, is a store’s primary purpose. Forget e-commerce, or bricks and mortar, or even omnichannel sales; according to Mr. Neves, the new retail era is one anchored in “augmented retail,” a blend of the digital and physical allowing a shopper to shift seamlessly between the two realms.....Holition is an augmented-reality consultancy and software provider based in London that has worked with some well-known retail brands.......“The holy grail for retailers is creating digital empathy....No one knows what the future will look like....those using technology and data to create bespoke personalized shopping experiences...are more likely to come out on top.”.....boutiques and physical events remained vital “marketing opportunities,” with a more specialized inventory selection and the opportunity for customers to do more than buy merchandise......talks, film screenings and designer meet-and-greets, along with social media lessons, exercise classes and floristry sessions.......“Stores cannot just be row after row of product rail anymore,” he added. . “To survive, they have to tell stories — rooted in a sense of community and entertainment — and have points of view that makes the owner stand out.”.......“Ultimately the use of data to transform stores will separate those who make it to the next step and those who won’t.
reimagining  retailers  physical_place  shopping_malls  cashierless  e-commerce  reconceptualization  future  shopping_experience  brands  fashion  omnichannel  bricks-and-mortar  MatchesFashion  Holition  Yoox  facial-recognition 
february 2018 by jerryking
How Retailers Can Thrive in the Age of Amazon - WSJ
By Stephen Moore
Dec. 15, 2017

How can a retailer flourish in such a daunting environment? By providing “emotional fulfillment,” = the joy customers take in seeing, touching, sniffing and testing the product before they pull out the credit card. A computer can’t match that experience...“We are social animals. We aren’t robots who are going to make all our purchases from robots.”

Somewhat counterintuitively....e-commerce is “not our enemy” but is becoming complementary to retail. Here’s his challenge to anyone who thinks digital sales are set to crush the old analog kind: ...If that isn’t enough, he adds: “Guess what’s one of our most successful stores we just opened up three months ago? Amazon. They already mastered online book sales. Why are they creating a physical presence? Because they know they need to connect and fuse with you as a consumer.” That’s what he means by emotional fulfillment.

He sketches out a strategy for retail in the digital age. It starts with making the mall an appealing place to visit. Parking is free, he says, and the stores are full of helpful employees. “We tell our retailers that one of the primary value added of retail shopping is the expertise that the salesclerks can offer customers,” he says, “They better be knowledgeable about what they are selling, or people will go online or to a discount store.” He urges his tenants to pay well more than the minimum wage to attract better employees, and he says most of them do
retailers  Amazon  contra-Amazon  shopping_malls  e-commerce  bricks-and-mortar  emotional_connections 
january 2018 by jerryking
Navigating a Breathtaking Level of Global Economic Change
November 14, 2017 |The New York Times | by Andrew Ross Sorkin.
you’d think that any sense of “faith” in the global economy might be shaken, or at least, uncertain given events like North Korea, Russian interference in elections in the United States, post-Brexit Europe, and hurricane damage.

Not so.

In conversation after conversation with some of the nation’s top business leaders and chief executives last week, there is a stunning amount of genuine “confidence” in our economy here and, yes, even globally.

“I’m very surprised,” Laurence D. Fink, the founder of BlackRock, the largest money manager in the world overseeing some $6 trillion, said at The New York Times DealBook conference last Thursday, describing his new sense of optimism.......Mark Cuban, whose disdain for President Trump is so acute that he is considering running for president himself in 2020 as a Republican because it “means you get to go head-on with Trump right in the primaries — and so there’s nothing I’d have more fun doing.” Still, though, he said he believes the economy is in good enough shape that when it comes to investing in the stock market, “I just, you know, I just let it ride.”

Mr. Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, said he keeps a small amount of cash on hand as a precaution. “I keep a little bit, you know, as a hedge. I call it my ‘Trump hedge’ because you just never know.....Earlier in 2017, The Conference Board reported that chief executives’ confidence had reached 2008 pre-recession highs in the first quarter.....there are pockets of the economy that are causing anxiety. “The last two or three years have not been fun whatsoever,” Mickey Drexler, the chairman of J. Crew, said at the conference about the traditional retail business, which has been upended by Amazon and changes in consumer behavior. “It’s been miserable.” Those challenges are extending to mall owners and commercial real estate, too..... is the stock market a proxy for the economy of America?....“In the aftermath of corporate and public-sector disasters, it often emerges that participants fell prey to a collective form of willful blindness and overconfidence: mounting warning signals were systematically cast aside or met with denial, evidence avoided or selectively reinterpreted, dissenters shunned,” Roland Bénabou a professor at Princeton University wrote in a seminal work on confidence and groupthink. “Market bubbles and manias exhibit the same pattern of investors acting ’colorblind in a sea of red flags,’ followed by a crash.”
confidence  Andrew_Sorkin  Mark_Cuban  Laurence_Fink  BlackRock  shifting_tastes  optimism  consumer_behavior  CEOs  J._Crew  Mickey_Drexler  commercial_real_estate  shopping_malls  warning_signs  groupthink  bubbles  overconfidence  precaution  global_economy  willful_blindness  manias  market_crash 
november 2017 by jerryking
Why traditional retail hasn’t hit rock bottom — yet
October 4, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | ERIC REGULY.
.....it's fashionable—and not wrong—to blame Amazon for most of the retailers' woes, other factors, from stale retail formats to the new anti-stuff movement, are at play too. Put together, the financial and cultural forces battering the retailers seem relentless.

The outlook is so grim that Bespoke Investment Group of Harrison, New York, invented a "Death by Amazon" list of 54 retail stocks that it thought would get whacked by Amazon and other forces conspiring against the sector......Traditional retailing, of course, is not entirely doomed because only the brave or bone-headed would buy some expensive items—diamond earrings, high-end suits, musical instruments, mattresses, Persian carpets, prescription sunglasses—without hands-on examination. And some shoppers, me among them, like the pleasure of propping up independent stores that sell high-quality goods.

But I don't shop much for general merchandise any more, because I am sick of clutter and, with university fees for my kids, don't have the spending power for non-essential items..... blamed shifting consumption patterns for much of the old-style retailers' distress........ blamed shifting consumption patterns for much of the old-style retailers' distress...money spent on smartphones and wireless services is unavailable to be spent on T-shirts and shoes.....middle-class incomes have stagnated, healthcare costs have climbed, and highly leveraged consumers are more interested in paying off debt than buying new TVs. Something had to give, and it was the department stores, whose shares are down by 40% or more in the last year or so (Macy's, J.C. Penney)......Amazon's endless virtual aisles sells Fiat cars in Italy, Nike shoes and and Sears' Kenmore appliances. Amazon recently bought Whole Foods and dropped its prices, which put the mainstream supermarkets into a panic........ 55% of product searches start on Amazon, far more than the 28% that start on search engines. The popularity of Amazon Prime (which provides free, two-day delivery as well as TV and movie video streaming) and the construction of massive warehouses have accelerated its growth. .....captures an estimated 40% of every shopping dollar spent online and is already the second-biggest apparel seller in the U.S., behind Wal-Mart. No wonder the traditional retail sector is in free fall.
And here's another question: As traditional retailers weaken or go out of business, and anchor stores disappear from North America's crazily over-malled shopping geography, can the real estate investment trusts be far behind? Betting against Amazon seems a fool's game.......
Eric_Reguly  retailers  decline  bricks-and-mortar  shifting_tastes  Amazon  REITs  shopping_malls  bankruptcies  department_stores  seismic_shifts  high-quality 
october 2017 by jerryking
A new industry has sprung up selling “indoor-location” services to retailers
Dec 24th 2016 | Economist

Tracking technologies are ingenious. Some flash out a code to smartphone cameras by means of LED lighting; others, such as IndoorAtlas, a startup with headquarters in California and Finland, monitor how devices disrupt a store’s geomagnetic field. With smartphone ownership rising, the market for tracking phones indoors could grow fivefold between now and 2021, to a total of $23bn, says Research and Markets, a market-research firm.

What do retailers hope to gain? The answer depends on how far they push the technology. On the most basic level, a store might notice that people often walk from “frozen goods” to “alcohol”, and then bring the two closer together. A retailer could also gain more insight into which departments are best at promoting goods—all without knowing anything about shoppers beyond where their legs take them.

If stores can persuade clients to reveal personal information, too, they stand to profit more......Apple and Google are beginning to offer indoor-location services to retailers that use the motion sensors already in handsets. These can see where their owners are, and where they are moving to, using a map of existing Wi-Fi or radio-frequency signals. Shops would not need to set up systems to follow their customers’ phones.
location_based_services  mapping  new_industries  tracking  shopping_malls  retailers  Walkbase  LBMA  IndoorAtlas  foot_traffic  Wi-Fi  Aisle411  Apple  Google  indoors 
september 2017 by jerryking
Disney Reimagines Its Stores to Be More Like a Vacation
SEPT. 26, 2017 | The New York Times | By BROOKS BARNES.

The redesign makes Disney’s stores a bit more like Disney’s theme parks. For instance, daily parades at Disneyland in California and Walt Disney World in Florida will be streamed live to those colossal video screens. During the parades, store personnel will put out mats for shoppers to sit on and roll out souvenir carts stocked with cotton candy and light-up Mickey Mouse ears.

The screens could easily be used to stream other events, such as red carpet arrivals for Disney movie premieres. That kind of programming could bolster foot traffic, and thus sales — while also turning the stores into a more potent promotional platform for Disney’s films, television shows and theme parks.....As it attempts a new mall strategy, Disney is also remaking its e-commerce operation. ShopDisney.com is replacing DisneyStore.com.
Disney  prototypes  retailers  overhaul  redesign  entertainment  makeovers  consumer_feedback  theme_parks  shopping_malls  e-commerce  reimagining  reconceptualization 
september 2017 by jerryking
Landlords Try Turning Strip Malls Into Winter Hangouts - WSJ
By Esther Fung
Sept. 19, 2017

Landlords of strip malls are trying to take the chill out of the air by adding outdoor entertainment programs (e.g. ice-skating rinks, fire pits and programmed entertainment such as tree-lightings), in hopes of attracting more shoppers in an era of declining foot traffic.....landlords are also overseeing residential property development in their out-parcels as well.......While shopping centers typically attract shoppers focused on transactions during the fall and holiday seasons, more landlords want to create destinations for the local community that may not be entirely focused on buying something........The moves come at a time when bigger shopping center landlords are investing more to cater to changing consumer lifestyles as shoppers handle more of their transactions online...........
shopping_malls  entertainment  commercial_real_estate  landlords  foot_traffic  shifting_tastes 
september 2017 by jerryking
European Mall Landlords Coping With Online Competition Better Than U.S. Owners - WSJ
Sept. 5, 2017 | WSJ | By Esther Fung.

Malls need to shift emphasis away from department stores and toward retailers that are less susceptible to competition from e-commerce........On average, department stores still occupy about 50% of the gross leasable area of shopping malls in the U.S., while similarly beleaguered apparel and accessory retailers take an additional 29%, said the CBRE report. Retail sectors that are growing, include restaurants, beauty and home furnishings, account for only a small percentage of the typical mall.

The traditional mall model, developed seven decades ago, is heavily dependent on categories that are no longer fast-growing or meeting today’s consumer demands,.....“Converting malls’ tenant bases to include more of the categories that in-person shoppers now favor won’t be an easy or quick fix,” ..... “But it is a necessary evolution for the mall industry to maintain its place as a cornerstone of American retail.”

One of potential obstacles is getting the buy-in of department stores, which usually hold contracts that hinder major changes to malls without their consent.

“Many department store chains gradually have become more accepting of change, but it isn’t a given. Those who reject change may do so at their own peril: There is a growing trend of mall owners buying out department store leases and redeveloping the space into restaurants and specialty stores,”
redevelopments  shopping_malls  landlords  Europe  restaurants  anchor_tenants  department_stores  CBRE 
september 2017 by jerryking
Mall Landlords Step Up Mobile Efforts to Woo Shoppers - WSJ
By Esther Fung
Aug. 22, 2017

Retailers are making progress incorporating the benefits of online shopping into the physical shopping experience, but consumers are still uncomfortable with location-based services that track their smartphones, according to a recent survey of 5,000 shoppers.

Faced with competition from online vendors, shopping-mall landlords and retailers have been trying to transform brick-and-mortar spaces with innovations such as click-and-collect services and other interactive shopping functions......“Retailers are figuring out click-and-collect over time and are making real progress toward omnichannel maturity,” said the report. Omnichannel retailing is a strategy of getting goods to customers seamlessly, whether online or in stores.

There has been a surge in the number of retailer bankruptcies and store closures this year, including many mall-based chains that are suffering from weaker mall traffic and competition from Amazon.com Inc.....According to the survey, a majority of shoppers aren’t comfortable allowing retailers to track their locations when they aren’t using the retailer’s apps or with changing messages on digital signs as shoppers pass by. Some 70% of the respondents said they weren’t likely to use retailer services that rely on location tracking via the phone when the app isn’t in use.
shopping_malls  landlords  retailers  BOPIS  omnichannel  bankruptcies  location_based_services 
august 2017 by jerryking
Retail sales per square foot in decline | Retail Dive
Daphne Howland
@daphnehowland
PUBLISHED

Aug. 1, 2017

Which stores to close can be a tricky decision, though, because of how offline stores add to online sales. Moody's Investors Service last year warned that closing a physical location reduces a retailer’s presence in the market area and noted that online sales often decrease in zip codes surrounding a shuttered store. It behooves mall landlords and retailers to leverage new technologies and new math to account for that, in order to make educated decisions, according to Hongwei Liu, CEO and co-founder of Mappedin, an indoor wayfinding platform for premium North American malls.

"Fortress mall operators are under heavy scrutiny, along with the rest of their industry," he told Retail Dive in an email. "Everyone knows retail space is overbuilt in the U.S., shares are down 35% from a year ago. Our mall customers, who are almost exclusively premium operators, say that 'rents are up, sales are up, occupancy is up' in 2017. Flush with cash but seeing depressed market valuations, hostile takeover bids are increasing. Anecdotally, more is being invested in technology and consumer experiences to 'recapture' (or re-demonstrate) the value that premium malls and retailers are creating."
MappedIn  shopping_malls  retailers  Apple  Tiffany  LBMA  anecdotal  sales_per_square_foot 
august 2017 by jerryking
Diversification key for mall developers as retail landscape evolves
Feb. 7, 2017 | Retail Dive | by Kenneth A. Rosen and Eric S. Chafetz.

Traditional anchors like Sears/Kmart and Macy’s are beset by competition from all sides, from freestanding big-box outlets (think Home Depot and Bed Bath & Beyond), to stores attracting fashion-forward yet price-conscious consumers (Target and Kohl’s) to mounting online competition from Amazon and others.

This is leading to the loss of mall tenants, especially anchor tenants, which are major drivers of all-important foot traffic.....Mall owners are (or should be) rethinking the very definition of a mall. New tenants such as high-end restaurants, amusement parks, spas, health clubs, online pickup locations at traditional retailers and upscale movie theaters increasingly are essential components........Reshaping malls into mixed-used developments might run counter to a business model that worked for decades, where mall owners and developers could simply be mall owners and developers. However, these entities must realize that the need for new thinking and investment in new types of amenities and features is greater than ever to drive foot traffic......Technology is also key, with some mall owners now allowing customers to text them questions and get real-time answers. Other malls have implemented mobile apps to provide turn-by-turn navigation from store-to-store in a mall and directions to their parked cars. ........Consider a successful shopping center developer, in this case seeking opportunities for growth. The developer might look to acquire store leases at malls owned by competitors where an anchor has closed and redevelop the space into a cluster of smaller stores or into a mixed-use property (restaurants, movie theaters, urgent care centers, spas, etc.)......The transformation of malls will continue, and usher in changes that would have been unfathomable a decade ago. Last year, two mall owners — Simon Properties and General Growth Partners — teamed up with Authentic Brands and a few inventory liquidators to purchase hundreds of Aeropostale stores out of bankruptcy. The justification from the mall owners was that they were not merely trying to save a tenant, but based on the bargain basement price that they paid, believed they could make a profit. As 2017 unfolds with the expectation of additional retail Chapter 11s and store closures, mall developers and owners also may look at their competitors with an eye toward new opportunities.
diversification  redevelopments  shopping_malls  REITs  department_stores  big-box  cost-consciousness  e-commerce  Amazon  foot_traffic  reinvention  competitive_landscape  mapping  retailers  store_closings  offensive_tactics  transformational 
august 2017 by jerryking
Mall REITs: 1Q17 Recap & 2Q17 Preview - Thasos Group
Key Conclusions

Most REITs operating malls classified as high quality Class A by Green Street Advisors have negative YoY foot traffic on a rolling quarterly basis through May 2017:
Simon Property Group (SPG): -5.4%
General Growth Partners (GGP): -5.7%
Taubman Centers (TCO): -6.2%
High-tech stores such as Apple, Microsoft, and Tesla have no effect in preventing declining traffic.
Malls with destination restaurants such as Cheesecake Factory and P.F. Chang’s underperform by 3.5%.
Malls with high-end department store anchors such as Nordstrom and Macy’s underperform by 3%.
Malls and strip centers with grocery stores and consumer staples outperform by 5%.
location_based_services  shopping_malls  REITs  insights  Thasos  outperformance 
july 2017 by jerryking
Chinks emerge in the armour of prized malls
22 July/23 July 2017 | Financial Times | Miles Johnson.

A defining feature of the financial crisis was a group of hedge funds making vast sums by wagering against supposedly AAA-rated mortgage debt well before markets imploded in 2008.

Now some believe a similar story will play out for US shopping malls — that the most risky investments will end up being those that investors now believe to be the safest. Central to their premise is the idea that too much faith may be being placed in a classification system used for shopping malls that is little known outside of the real estate sector.....investors are also actively leaving the office and conducting field research.

In April researchers from a large US hedge fund travelled to the outer boroughs of New York to a shopping mall that is home to Apple and Armani among other retailers....To their surprise the researchers quickly came across a pop-up shop selling cheaply manufactured stuffed teddy bears and plastic toys. Two months later the store had disappeared....
The stock market has until recently appeared to believe that prime “A” malls are largely insulated from the pain being felt across a US retail sector being shaken by e-commerce.

Shares in Washington Prime, an operator of lower quality B and C classed malls, are down by half since the start of 2015. However, until recently shares in “prime” mall operators Simon Property Group and GGP had held up, underpinned by the belief that their A-quality malls in prime locations were safe from the challenge of online shopping.......Yet there is growing evidence to suggest that these prime malls, which have been treated by investors and lenders alike as rock solid bets in the face of the internet headwinds, are not as protected as once thought.

Shares in Simon Property, the largest Reit in America with a market value of $50bn, are down by almost 30 per cent over the past 12 months, having held up strongly to the middle of 2016. Short interest in Simon, which tracks the amount of shares hedge funds have borrowed to bet that its value will fall, rose to the highest level since the financial crisis last month, with bets worth more than $1bn.....The hedge funds wagering against the highest quality malls believe that the wider market will come to believe these A-quality malls are far more similar to lesser ranked ones. “This idea that there are these magic malls in America that are immune to secular change is a myth,” the US-based hedge fund manager says.

Some argue that the market under-appreciates that A class mall operators and B and C class mall operators all have very similar tenant bases, in spite of being in different locations. L Brands, the owner of lingerie chain Victoria’s Secret, is the largest single tenant for prime operator GGP, according to company filings.....it is also the biggest tenant for the lesser ranked CBL and second largest for Washington Prime.....Russell Clark of Horseman Capital notes the vulnerability malls have to the loss of single big brands, known as anchor tenants, with their departure often triggering a wave of rent loss with other tenants.

“Many tenants have a clause in their lease to reduce rents should an anchor close a store. Thus, even though the loss of rent due to an anchor closing is minimal, the knock-on effect of reduced rents from the remaining tenants is a serious concern,” he noted.....the hunt for opportunities to bet against quality malls outside the US. The share prices of Intu Properties and Hammerson, the UK’s largest publicly listed shopping centre operators, have not yet followed the falls seen in the shares of their largest tenants.
shopping_malls  commercial_real_estate  real_estate  MappedIn  mapping  hedge_funds  primary_field_research  pop-ups  store_closings  pretense_of_knowledge  illusions  under_appreciated  retailers  vulnerabilities  anchor_tenants  REITs  L_Brands  A-class  B-class  C-class  Victoria's_Secret 
july 2017 by jerryking
Mall Owners Flex Hidden Muscles Over Lenders - WSJ
increasing uncertainty over the fate of malls across the U.S., stemming from the rise of e-commerce and fickle consumer preferences, have led to more volatile valuations in recent years.

Landlords who owe millions of dollars on struggling shopping malls are finding they have serious bargaining power.

At a time when retailers are closing thousands of stores across the U.S., some lenders are deciding to renegotiate loans backing malls—and suffer guaranteed losses—rather than run the risk of being stuck owning or operating the malls themselves.

Shopping mall owner Washington Prime Group WPG -0.94% last June defaulted on an $87.3 million loan backing Mesa Mall in Grand Junction, Colo., and turned the keys over to creditors.
Rather than operate the mall, the creditors quickly sold the property—right back to Washington Prime—at a lower price. Late last month, Washington Prime told investors it had repurchased the mall and secured a discounted payoff of the original loan for $63 million.

While the creditors, a collection of bondholders such as insurers and other institutional investors, took a write-down of $24.3 million, they avoided having to own or operate the mall themselves.
=============================
RESEARCH: MORE STORES NEED TO SHUT

In April 2016, real-estate research firm Green Street said roughly 800 stores should be closed to bring department-store retailers back to a level in which sales per square foot is in line with 2006 levels, a period considered normal.

Now the research firm is raising the tally.

“Just a year later, the 800 number looks much too light on a strict sales productivity standpoint and is much lower than what will ultimately be needed as the industry will likely need to massively rationalize its store count as it reinvents its business model,” Green Street said in a report.
===============================
“There’s a secular change in how people are shopping at the mall, which is affecting short-term value-enhancement strategies,”
shopping_malls  creditors  landlords  commercial_real_estate  sales_per_square_foot  store_closings 
july 2017 by jerryking
Has America Built Its Last Major Mall? - WSJ
By Esther Fung
June 27, 2017

Appetite for building enclosed malls of more than 800,000 square feet has dried up. Department stores, once dependable foot-traffic generators, are closing locations amid stiff competition from off-price retailers and the growth of online shopping.

A mall construction spree in the 1970s and 1980s has left in its wake aging properties at a time when there is little capital available for upgrades. As anchor stores close, more mall space sits idle and foot traffic wanes, hastening the march toward death.

In all, there are roughly 1,200 malls in the U.S., and some analysts see the figure bottoming out at 500 to 800.
shopping_malls  retailers  e-commerce  commercial_real_estate  Taubman  foot_traffic  department_stores 
june 2017 by jerryking
As Retailers Race to Close Stores, a Web Startup Is Opening Them - WSJ
By Khadeeja Safdar
April 30, 2017

Online brands are treading more carefully into physical retail. Several brands, such as Everlane, Casper and Warby Parker, have opened temporary stores to test out foot traffic and experiment with new concepts. ....One challenge for online brands is to ensure that new locations increase sales, rather than cannibalize existing business.

“We have to see the interplay between our online and offline channels,” said Ms. Ulman. “A customer who shops online and offline is supposed to be very valuable, but we want to understand just how much more valuable.”....Online apparel brands are finding that they don’t need much to set up a store. The evolution of point-of-sales technology means that transactions can now be made on phones and tablets. Some newer retailers don’t even keep much inventory. Bonobos, which started out selling men’s clothing online, lets customers try on items at its more than two dozen “guideshops” and mails purchases to their doorsteps.

Greats sells eight core styles of shoes in different colors and materials, making its business more mobile than that of a traditional retailer. At its new locations, the company plans to bring its own interior elements such as shelving, greenery and lighting.

“You can do a lot within four walls,” said Ms. Ulman. “All we really need is some Wi-Fi.”
clicks-to-bricks  sneakers  pop-ups  e-commerce  retailers  store_closings  shopping_malls  landlords  bricks-and-mortar  foot_traffic  omnichannel  short-term  leasing  inventory-free  cannibalization  Bonobos  Everlane  Casper  Warby_Parker  point-of-sale  brands  Wi-Fi  mens'_clothing  apparel  physical_retail 
june 2017 by jerryking
Mall Landlords Roll the Dice With Tech Investments - WSJ
By Esther Fung
Updated June 20, 2017

Mall landlords are investing millions of dollars in technology to help protect them from the changes buffeting the retail sector as internet shopping gains a stronger foothold.

Some of the investments aren’t faring so well.

Macerich Co., one of the biggest U.S. mall owners, last quarter wrote off $10 million invested in a startup that purported to help online and European retailers expand their physical store presence in the U.S......landlords face growing pressure to remain relevant, and are investing more resources to understand the industry’s disrupters. Larger landlords with stronger balance sheets, such as Simon Property Group and Westfield Corp. , have been setting aside millions of dollars for incubators to take on risks similar to venture capitalists......“The real-estate technology industry is heating up, bringing along with it quite a bit of noise,” said Hongwei Liu, CEO of MappedIn, a six-year-old Canada-based firm that provides indoor mapping and search software for property owners.

The firm has developed digital maps for more than 300 U.S. malls, including for the top mall REITs.
shopping_malls  landlords  technology  MappedIn  mapping  risk-taking  retailers  indoors 
june 2017 by jerryking
The Mall of the Future Will Have No Stores - WSJ
By Esther Fung
June 12, 2017

As retailers close bricks-and-mortar stores at an accelerating pace, shopping-center landlords like Starwood Capital are facing a vexing question: What to do with all this empty space?

Their solutions are varied but all have a common element: reducing, or even eliminating, retail from the equation.

Some landlords plug empty spaces with churches, for-profit schools and random enterprises while they figure out a long-term plan. Others see a future in mixed-use real estate, converting malls into streetscapes with restaurants, offices and housing. And some are razing properties altogether and turning them into entertainment or industrial parks......A construction binge in the 1980s and ’90s left the U.S. oversaturated with malls. Growth in online sales and declining demand for full-priced goods are causing retailers to shrink their store fleets and divert resources to e-commerce platforms.....Many mall owners are trying to liven up the experience, bringing more dining and entertainment tenants and eschewing the traditional mix of middling food courts, fashion retailers and department stores.

“The appetite for experimentation is there,...but Sometimes developers conclude that the only way to save a dying mall is to level it and start over.
shopping_malls  landlords  retailers  trends  future  randomness  experiential_marketing  e-commerce  store_closings  experimentation  property_development  physical_space  oversaturation 
june 2017 by jerryking
Sears Canada raises ‘significant doubt’ about its future - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jun. 13, 2017 .

a number of retailers stand to profit from Sears’s woes. One of them is archrival Hudson’s Bay Co., which announced last week it is letting go 2,000 employees in North America and revamping to generate $350-million in annual savings.

“When a competitor is out, more customers are looking for a substitute,” said Hugh Latif of Hugh Latif & Associates Management Consultants.

Other potential beneficiaries of Sears’s problems could be discount giant Wal-Mart Canada Corp., Quebec fashion specialist La Maison Simons and Canadian Tire Corp., all of which may look at buying some of the Sears leases, in some cases to nab a better location, Mr. Latif said. Simons is one of the few retailers in this country that is rapidly expanding.

“Probably landlords will sweeten the pie for them,” he said.

And retailers such as Canadian Tire and Wal-Mart have been interested in potentially picking up some parts of Sears, most notably its rights to prominent brand names such as Kenmore appliances, industry sources said......In its transformation efforts, Sears Canada has so far relaunched four stores under its more minimal redesign, with 10 more planned this summer. It has also installed new technology for its “Initium” digital strategy, although it has faced some setbacks in the rollout. And along with introducing off-price discounted designer lines in apparel and home goods – borrowing a page from retailer Winners’s playbook, it also has overhauled its private-label lines under the new Sears Label to offer more affordable, higher-margin fashions and home décor items.
Sears_Canada  retailers  shopping_malls  Marina_Strauss  landlords  rollouts  HBC  Target  digital_strategies  store_closings  department_stores  playbooks 
june 2017 by jerryking
Sorry, we’re closed: The decline of established American retailing threatens jobs | The Economist
May 13th 2017 | New York

Therein lies the problem for America’s retailers. Not every mall or shop is dying. For now, store-occupancy rates are healthy. Nor have consumers stopped shopping. But they are spending money in new ways to the benefit of other businesses, such as restaurants, hotels and e-retailers, in particular Amazon. As a result, a giant established industry is descending into crisis.

Last year about 4,000 shops closed their doors for good. In 2017 more than twice that number may shut, says Credit Suisse, a bank. Consumer confidence is strong and unemployment is at its lowest level in a decade, yet S&P Global Ratings expects retailing defaults this year to surpass those in 2009 when the economy was in the depths of a recession.

The most important question is how far and how fast the industry might sink. This has implications not only for retailers and retail-property companies but also the financial firms that have given them money, from banks to life-insurance companies.
Amazon  decline  e-commerce  shopping_malls  retailers  dying  reboot  commercial_real_estate  store_closings 
may 2017 by jerryking
Tills and skills: How to prepare America’s retail workers for technological change | The Economist
May 12th 2017

America’s retail industry is huge: it employs 15.9m workers, who represent one in nine American jobs. It is also undergoing wrenching change, as e-commerce eats into sales. There is no more pressing test of society’s ability to cope with technology’s impact on work....For all the benefits that online retailing brings to consumers, it is causing immense pain to offline rivals. Last year 4,000 American stores closed; this year more than twice that number may shutter. Standard & Poor’s, a rating agency, expects retail defaults this year to outnumber those in 2009, at the height of the global recession. Some formats—discount stores, groceries, high-end malls—will continue to thrive. But many will shrink. The industry has shed 50,000 net jobs since January. Department stores may need to close more than 800 stores to reach the productivity levels of 2006. Many outlets are looking for ways to cut labour costs by embracing automation....The problems faced by America’s retailers are particularly acute because there are so many of them: shopping centres eat up five times more space per person than in Britain. But the threat posed by technology is familiar to workers elsewhere. In Japan, online sales menace small, specialty shops that account for roughly half of sales. The Eurasia Group, a consultancy, reckons that 192m retail jobs around the world are vulnerable to automation.....A 21st-century approach to careers advice would see employers across industries identify transferable skills: rather than thinking of e-commerce as a natural move for shop assistants, their ability to handle customers might make them more suitable for roles in health care, for example. Armed with such advice, people in at-risk industries such as retailing could be given learning accounts, topped up by government, that can be used to pay for new skills. Benefits could be made more portable, making it easier for workers to switch between full-time employment and the gig economy as circumstances change.
job_destruction  job_displacement  job_loss  e-commerce  store_closings  retailers  Standard_&_Poor’s  grocery  shopping_malls  department_stores  oversaturation  safety_nets  automation  technological_change  market_saturation  transferable_skills 
may 2017 by jerryking
Three Hard Lessons the Internet Is Teaching Traditional Stores
April 23, 2017 | WSJ | By Christopher Mims.
Legacy retailers have to put their mountains of purchasing data to work to create the kind of personalization and automation shoppers are getting online
(1) Data Is King
When I asked Target, Walgreens and grocery chain Giant Food about loyalty programs and the fate of customers’ purchasing data—which is the in-store equivalent of your web browsing history—they all declined to comment. ...Data has been a vital part of Amazon’s retail revolution, just as it was with Netflix ’s media revolution and Google and Facebook ’s advertising revolution. For brick-and-mortar retailers, purchasing data doesn’t just help them compete with online adversaries; it has also become an alternate revenue source when profit margins are razor-thin. ....Physical retailers must catch up to online retailers in collecting rich data without making it feel so intrusive. Why, exactly, does my grocery store need my phone number?

(2) Personalization + Automation = Profits
Personalization and Automation = Profits
There’s a debate in the auto industry: Can Tesla get good at making cars faster than Ford, General Motors and Toyota can get good at making self-driving electric vehicles? The same applies to retail: Can physical retailers build intimate digital relationships with their customers—and use that data to update their stores—faster than online-first retailers can learn how to lease property, handle inventory and manage retail workers? [the great game ]

Online retailers know what’s popular, and how customers who like one item tend to like certain others. So Amazon’s physical bookstores can put out fewer books with more prominently displayed covers. Bonobos doesn’t even sell clothes in its stores, which it calls “guideshops.” Instead, customers go there to try clothes on, and their selections are delivered through the company’s existing e-commerce system.

Amazon’s upcoming Go convenience stores, selling groceries and meal kits, don’t require cashiers. That’s the sort of automation that could position Amazon to reap margins—or slash prices—to a degree unprecedented for retailers in traditionally low-margin categories like food and packaged goods.

While online retailers are accustomed to updating inventory and prices by the hour, physical retailers simply don’t have the data or the systems to keep up, and tend to buy and stock on cycles as long as a year, says George Faigen, a retail consultant at Oliver Wyman. Some legacy retailers are getting around this by teaming up with online players.

Target stocks men’s shaving supplies from not one but two online upstarts, Harry’s and Bevel. Target has said that, as a result, more customers are coming in to buy razors, increasing the sales of every brand on that aisle—even good old Gillette. Retailers have long relied on manufacturers to drive customers to stores by marketing their goods and even managing in-store displays. The difference is this: In the past, new brands had to persuade store buyers to dole out precious shelf space; now the brands can prove themselves online first.

(3) Legacy Tech Won’t Cut It

Perhaps the biggest challenge for existing retailers, says Euromonitor’s Ms. Grant, is finding the money to transition to this hybrid online-offline model. While Target has announced it will spend $7 billion over the next three years to revamp its stores, investors fled the stock in February after Target reported 2017 profits might be 25% less than expected.

When Warby Parker, the online eyeglasses retailer, set out to launch stores across the U.S., the company looked for in-store sales software that could integrate with its existing e-commerce systems. It couldn’t find a system up to the task, so it built one from scratch.

These kinds of systems allow salespeople to know what customers have bought both online and off, and what they might be nudged toward on that day. “We call it the ‘point of everything’ system,” says David Gilboa, co-founder and co-chief executive.

Having this much customer knowledge available instantly is critical, but it’s precisely what existing retailers struggle with, Mr. Faigen says.

Even Amazon is experiencing brick-and-mortar difficulties. In March, The Wall Street Journal reported that the Go stores would be delayed because of kinks in the point-of-sale software system.

Andy Katz-Mayfield, co-founder and co-chief executive of Harry’s, is skeptical that traditional retailers like Wal-Mart can make the leap, even if they invest heavily in technology.

The problem, he says, is that selling online isn’t just about taking orders through a website. Companies that succeed are good at selling direct to consumers—building technology from the ground up, integrating teams skilled at navigating online marketing’s ever-shifting terrain and managing the experience through fulfillment and delivery, Mr. Katz-Mayfield says.

That e-commerce startups are so confident about their own future doesn’t mean they are right about the fate of traditional retailers, however.

A report from Merrill Lynch argues Wal-Mart is embarking on a period of 20% to 30% growth for its e-commerce business. A spokesman for the company said that in addition to acquisitions, the company is focused on growing its e-commerce business organically.

It isn’t hard to picture today’s e-commerce companies becoming brick-and-mortar retailers. It’s harder to bet on traditional retailers becoming as tech savvy as their e-competition.[the great game]
lessons_learned  bricks-and-mortar  retailers  curation  personalization  e-commerce  shopping_malls  automation  privacy  Warby_Parker  Amazon_Go  data  data_driven  think_threes  Bonobos  Amazon  legacy_tech  omnichannel  Harry’s  Bevel  loyalty_management  low-margin  legacy_players  digital_first  Tesla  Ford  GM  Toyota  automobile  electric_cars  point-of-sale  physical_world  contra-Amazon  brands  shelf_space  the_great_game  cyberphysical  cashierless  Christopher_Mims  in-store  digital_savvy 
april 2017 by jerryking
The Internet Isn’t Killing Shopping Malls—Other Malls Are - WSJ
By Esther Fung
April 18, 2017

One common hallmark of a dead or dying mall is the closure of an anchor store. When that happened, fewer customers tended to visit, resulting in more store closures, which led to even fewer shoppers, and so on......Landlords have grappled with numerous threats over the years. Two decades ago, Blockbuster was eating into the revenue of movie chains, while big-box stores were battering smaller stand-alone retailers, noted Sandler O’Neill Partners analysts in a recent report.

This time, factors such as consumers being more thoughtful about their purchases after the recession, the overbuilding of retail centers and retailers’ focus on investing in more online shopping channels are pressuring mall landlords.

Property owners generally try to court trendier brands and avoid outdated retailers. In recent years, they have started shaking up their tenant mix more radically, moving away from full-price apparel brands and toward entertainment and food offerings.

That is resulting in a more dramatic separation of the strongest and weakest malls, with top-tier malls in cities with strong population and income growth receiving more investment and weaker malls suffering from neglect.
shopping_malls  competition  e-commerce  landlords  commercial_real_estate  retailers  anchor_tenants  top-tier 
april 2017 by jerryking
Amazon’s Next Big Move: Take Over the Mall
November 14, 2016 | Technology Review | by Nicholas Carr .

What’s Amazon doing with Amazon Books?...Wall Street analysts and tech writers have filled the void with conjecture. The stores are all about selling gadgets, goes one popular idea, with the books there just to lure customers. The stores are data-gathering machines, goes another, enabling Amazon to extend its tracking of customers into the physical world. Or maybe the company’s secret plan is to use the stores to promote its cloud computing operation, Amazon Web Services, to other retailers....The theories are intriguing, and they may contain bits of truth. But the real impetus behind the stores is probably much simpler: Amazon wants to sell more books....Not long ago, the common wisdom held that Amazon would remake the book business in its own image. Its Web store would kill off bookstores, and its Kindle would render physical books obsolete. ...
“Pure-play Web retailing is not sustainable.”Bezos underestimated the allure of bricks and paper. With his bookstore chain, he now seems to be admitting that if Amazon is to expand its share of the book market, it will need to invest in bricks as well as bits....Having come up short in its plan to supplant books and bookstores with digital alternatives, the company is taking its revenge by attacking traditional bookshops on their own turf. Unlike the mom-and-pop independents, or even the struggling Barnes & Noble chain, Amazon has the scale and the cash required to wage a war of attrition. It can sustain losses on its stores for a long time.....Amazon Books may be just the vanguard of a much broader push into brick-and-mortar retailing by the company. In October, the Wall Street Journal revealed that Amazon is planning to open a chain of convenience stores, mainly for groceries, along with drive-in depots where consumers will be able to pick up merchandise ordered online. It has also begun rolling out small “pop-up” stores to hawk its electronic devices. It already has more than two dozen such kiosks in malls around the country, and dozens more are said to be in the works.

Even after 20 years of rapid growth, e-commerce still accounts for less than 10 percent of total retail sales. And now the rise of mobile computing places new constraints on Web stores.At the same time, the smartphone, with its apps, its messaging platforms, and its constant connectivity, gives retailers more ways to communicate with and influence customers, even when they’re shopping in stores. This is why the big trend in retailing today is toward “omnichannel” strategies, which blend physical stores, Web stores, and mobile apps in a way that makes the most of the convenience of smartphones and overcomes their limitations.....Beyond its expertise in Web sales, Amazon brings distinctive strengths to an omnichannel operation. Its vast, efficient network of warehouses and distribution centers can supply outlets and process returns. It has, thanks to the largesse and patience of its investors, a reservoir of cheap capital that it can draw on to fund a building spree. And it has a much-admired brand. What Amazon lacks is experience in the touchy-feely world of traditional retailing (e.g. merchandising??). The company’s proficiency in software and data crunching is unquestioned. Its people skills are another matter..... another of the store’s goals: to promote the Prime program, which is central to Amazon’s strategy of locking in customers....I feel let down. I had convinced myself that I was going to witness something fresh and unexpected at Amazon Books. What I found was an annex to a website—a store that, despite the bricks and paper, retains the coldness of the virtual.
e-commerce  shopping_malls  Amazon  Amazon_Prime  books  sterile  soulless  Nicholas_Carr  Amazon_Books  bricks-and-mortar  Jeff_Bezos  pure-plays  bookstores  omnichannel  strengths  smartphones  mobile_applications  loyalty_management  impersonal  people_skills  Achilles’_heel  weaknesses  convenience_stores  pop-ups  kiosks  voids  merchandising  AWS  physical_world  mom-and-pop  coldness  touchy-feely  cyberphysical  emotional_connections  empathy_vacuum  Amazon_Go  cashierless  locked_in  distribution_centres 
february 2017 by jerryking
Anchors Away: Malls Lose More Department Store Tenants - WSJ
By LIAM PLEVEN
Updated Feb. 23, 2016

The rise of online shopping and changing consumer habits are battering the big department stores known as anchors that once lured shoppers to malls—leaving landlords with empty space and forcing them to undertake expensive overhauls to stay relevant.
shopping_malls  commercial_real_estate  retailers  LBMA  e-commerce 
february 2016 by jerryking
Retail reboot: How e-commerce is forcing an industry transformation - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Nov. 14 2014

The Future Shop store reinvention is part of a wider retail reboot sweeping through the industry as retailers and malls are being forced to adapt amid the relentless surge of e-commerce. Shopper traffic in stores is in decline. At the same time, e-commerce is soaring and has never been more competitive.

Meanwhile, consumers expect more for less, as retailers increasingly lure them with a variety of new ways to shop in person and online, with added bonuses such as free shipping.

It all adds up to intensifying competition ahead for an industry already at war as big new entrants in Canada battle with established players to win over fickle consumers.
retailers  e-commerce  Marina_Strauss  reboot  expectations  foot_traffic  decline  shopping_malls  new_entrants 
november 2014 by jerryking
Online shopping forces malls to evolve to keep customers coming back - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Sep. 24 2014
Marina_Strauss  e-commerce  shopping_experience  shopping_malls 
september 2014 by jerryking
Mall makeover: A new retail fight heats up - The Globe and Mail
TARA PERKINS AND MARINA STRAUSS Jan. 28 2014,

"I said to him, 'Look, you're missing an amazing opportunity,' " Mr. Sullivan recalls. "'We have a mall [the Eaton Centre] that has 50 million people a year walk through it. We are going to announce that we've got a Nordstrom deal shortly. And you have a great store at the other end, the Bay, which you've done a terrific job re-engineering. Why don't you think about putting a Saks in as part of that?....Dramatic changes in the retail landscape are providing a wake-up call for mall landlords, prompting them to replace tired retailers with new ones and leading Cadillac Fairview to launch a makeover of its Eaton Centre. There has been an influx of savvy foreign retailers, and every mall wants to be the first to attract the next big brand that migrates to Canada....."The ultimate goal is to have the right mix of anchors and small shops such that you maximize traffic, you maximize sales, and everyone wins."
Cadillac_Fairview  shopping_malls  HBC  Saks  Nordstrom  Marina_Strauss  retailers  product_launches  makeovers  anchor_tenants  store_within_a_store  luxury  landlords 
january 2014 by jerryking
Going small the best route for cash-rich Metro
January 30, 2013 | G & M pg. B2 |by Sophie Cousineau.

Metro is a great operator with an outstanding track record. Its first-quarter results, which on Tuesday reported first-quarter profit of $121.4­ mil1ion compared with $103.7 ­million in the year earlier period, prove it yet again. Yet the Quebec grocery chain has had it relatively easy in recent years. Its main competitor, Loblaw, was its own worst enemy, struggling with its merchandising and its computer systems. Metro dominates the Quebec market with an estimated market share among conventional food distributors.

But the market is changing. WalMart Canada is expanding unreand Target is emerging as a formidable foe from the ruins of Zellers. To say that the competition is heating up is an understatement. These American retailers are shaking a Tabasco bottle over the Quebec and Ontario markets, dotting these provinces with super-sized stores and bountiful grocery aisles.

Target is not considered as serious as a menace as Wal­Mart. Many of Target's stores are located in shopping malls where Metro has exclusivity rights on the sale of food. Wal-­Mart, which started sending out food flyers to Quebec homes, is another story.
But even with an acquisition as important and as as Safeway’s, Metro could never “outscale” or even come close to it. And while Metro has two discount banners. its namesake stores don"t venture into price wars nor would they want to
go on the American retailers' turi war. By putting the accent on the freshest fruits and vegetables and the best shopping experience, Metro is taking a different tack from its American competitors.
Getting scale in the pharmacy business would make a lot more sense for Metro. As a pharmaceutical distributor and a drugstore operator under the Brunet banner, Metro is a regional Quebec player. Yet for there to be an acquisition, Metro needs a seller. While Jean Coutu Group Inc. is aging, the Coutu family has nevel expressed the slightest interest ir selling the business they control through multiple voting shares. Moreover, they are focusing their energy on Canada after retreating from the American market.
supermarkets  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  retailers  price_wars  pharmacies  grocery  ethnic_communities  scaling  Jean_Coutu  Wal-Mart  Target  Metro  competitive_landscape  Sophie_Cousineau  merchandising  shopping_malls 
january 2013 by jerryking
New Wi-Fi Pitch: Tracker - WSJ.com
June 18, 2012 | WSJ | By ANTON TROIANOVSKI
(Send to Asif)
Network Developers Offer Retailers Ways to Keep Tabs on Customers as They Shop.

Venues like stores, malls and airports are installing Wi-Fi networks to please smartphone-toting shoppers, who use them to get faster Internet access and avoid cellular-data charges.

But Wi-Fi technology also lets the network operator keep tabs on what users are doing—from where they're standing to what websites they're viewing. That lets retailers learn in what aisle shoppers are most likely to point their iPhone's Web browser to Amazon.com. Mall owners have a new way to judge which storefronts attract the most foot traffic. And owners of Wi-Fi networks can turn their antennas into virtual billboards, charging a premium for ads sent to users' phones in prime locations.
retailers  tracking  Wi-Fi  Boingo  shopping_malls  foot_traffic  Turnstyle  location_based_services 
june 2012 by jerryking
The rise and fall of the ethnic mall - The Globe and Mail
DAKSHANA BASCARAMURTY

The Globe and Mail

Last updated Friday, Jun. 15 2012
Toronto  ethnic_communities  retailers  shopping_malls  GTA 
june 2012 by jerryking
Oakland Seeks a Lift From Pop-Up Stores - WSJ.com
JANUARY 12, 2012 | WSJ | By LAUREN RUDSER.

Pop-up stores aren't a new phenomenon—often they are seasonal, setting up for holidays like Halloween or Christmas. Restaurants also occasionally pop up for a night or two to test a new menu or location. Such stores have become more prevalent nationwide with the increasing number of storefronts left vacant amid a weak economy, says Jesse Tron, a spokesman with the International Council of Shopping Centers.

What makes popuphood different is the number of stores opening simultaneously, and the goal of going from pop-up to permanent.
pop-ups  economic_development  urban  cities  weak_economy  shopping_malls  store_openings  testing  holidays 
january 2012 by jerryking
THE PROPERTY REPORT: Malls Make Room for Start-Ups - WSJ.com
AUGUST 3, 2011, 12:40 A.M. ET
By A.D. PRUITT

Mall owners trying to keep their space filled amid the economic downturn
have found an unexpected source of relief: demand from newly minted
retailers.

With the unemployment rate persistently high, people suffering from lost
jobs, foreclosures and other hardships are turning to selling such
merchandise as jewelry, calendars, sunglasses or seasonal fare for
Christmas and Halloween. During the boom years, many mall landlords had
little incentive to take chances by providing these start-ups with
space.

But mall owners have become more willing to lease kiosks, carts and even
empty stores to these entrepreneurs of necessity. So-called specialty
products now make up one of the fastest-growing segments of the retail
industry, (reference John Corless)
shopping_malls  kiosks  pop-ups  retailers  economic_downturn  start_ups  hardships 
august 2011 by jerryking
Pop-ups present tenant issues
Dec. 20, 2010 |Financial Post | Drew Hasselback.
If you're a commercial landlord, you may have wondered about granting space to pop-ups. They may broaden your shopping centre's product range, but they don't come with the polish you expect from your long-term tenants. The rapid appearance and exit of pop-up stores at holiday times raises some unique legal issues and requires a frank discussion between the landlord and the tenant before any rental deal is signed. Each side needs to understand the other's objectives, and those understandings should be spelled out in writing to prevent future conflicts.
kiosks  retailers  shopping_malls  pop-ups  short-lived  clarity  commercial_real_estate  landlords 
december 2010 by jerryking
Big-box competition forces malls to shape up - The Globe and Mail
Aug. 23, 2010 | Globe & Mail | by Sarah Boesveld.

Everyone in retail knows the customer is king. But malls that are shedding tenants have likely lost sight of the people they need to attract.

These malls must look far beyond current shoppers and target the ideal customer, says Mark Healy, partner at Satov Consultants, a Toronto-based management consultancy. Promoting cross-shopping - with a solid mix of retail that includes fashion, pharmacy, music, shoes and so on - can help attract families that may have fatter wallets than the senior citizens and teenagers who might be the more frequent customers as the mall declines, ......"It was 'Let's re-conceptualize what the mall is: Not simply a shopping destination, but a community hub.'" Enticing local physicians, community programs or the municipality to open offices in the mall can almost guarantee a boost in foot traffic, Mr. Healy says. "Look at everything from church groups to minor league soccer to parades and say, 'How do you leverage the mall as an anchor place?'"

Paired with a good mix of stores, it's a great way to get soccer moms roaming the malls when they pick up and drop off their kids, he adds. But the "mall as community hub" is more than just a strategy to drive traffic, he says. It gives the place an identity and builds a connection with shoppers, one that can be further forged if you try to weave local entrepreneurs into the mix of higher profile retailers,
anchor_tenants  big-box  cross-shopping  foot_traffic  reconceptualization  retailers  shopping_malls 
august 2010 by jerryking
Santa Monica Mall Gets a Makeover - WSJ.com
JULY 5, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By KRIS HUDSON. Kill the Mall's Main Roof, Add a Big Plaza
commercial_real_estate  shopping_malls  California  Santa_Monica  travel  retailers 
july 2010 by jerryking
Article: News - Anti-mall creator hopes to expand
September 05, 2009 | THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | By KIMBERLY EDDS.
real_estate  shopping_malls 
december 2009 by jerryking
Indoor malls build community - The Globe and Mail
Chris Atchison

Special to The Globe and Mail Published on Tuesday, Dec. 01, 2009
BIAs  community  shopping_malls  retailers  community_builders 
december 2009 by jerryking
Retail sale data and the evaluation of major retail centers
Ramsey, Ranney. The Appraisal Journal. Chicago: Oct 1994. Vol. 62, Iss. 4; pg. 497, 10 pgs
retailers  data  shopping_malls 
june 2009 by jerryking
Data Mining for Shopping Centres - customer knowledge management framework
2001 | Journal of Knowledge Management | Charles Dennis; David Marsland; Tony Cockett
data_mining  retailers  BIAs  shopping  shopping_malls 
may 2009 by jerryking

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