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U.S. Scurries to Shore Up Spying on Russia - WSJ
By ADAM ENTOUS, JULIAN E. BARNES and SIOBHAN GORMAN CONNECT
Updated March 24, 2014

There were no Americans on the ground in Crimea to check reports of Russian military movements, U.S. officials say. The U.S. also didn't have drones overhead to gather real-time intelligence, officials say. That increased the U.S.'s reliance on satellite imagery and information gleaned from an analysis of social media, which was muddled by Russian disinformation. State Department officials declined to discuss any technical-intelligence activities.

If Mr. Putin decided to launch a takeover, many U.S. intelligence analysts thought he would use troops participating in the military exercises. Officials now say they underestimated the quality of Russian forces inside Crimea....U.S. military officials also made urgent calls to their counterparts in Russia. Not surprisingly, Russian military officials offered little information. Some of them claimed to be surprised. "It was classic maskirovka," says a senior U.S. official, using the Russian word for camouflage. Spies use the word to describe Moscow's tradition of sophisticated deception tactics.
espionage  surveillance  sigint  Russia  Crimea  imagery  satellites  security_&_intelligence  warning_signs  Vladimir_Putin  disinformation  camouflage  deception  intelligence_analysts 
november 2014 by jerryking
China's Spy Agency Has Broad Reach - WSJ
By JAMES T. AREDDY in Shanghai, PAUL MOZUR in Beijing and DANNY YADRON in San Francisco CONNECT
July 7, 2014
China  security_&_intelligence  sigint  PLA  surveillance  3PLA  cyber_warfare 
august 2014 by jerryking
China's Spy Agency Has Broad Reach - WSJ
By JAMES T. AREDDY in Shanghai, PAUL MOZUR in Beijing and DANNY YADRON in San Francisco CONNECT
July 7, 2014
security_&_intelligence  China  cyber_warfare  PLA  espionage  sigint 
july 2014 by jerryking
NSA may be putting Israeli security interests above U.S., new document reveals - World Israel News | Haaretz
By Haaretz | May 15, 2014

Greenwald, who published many of Snowden's revelations over the last year, released his book "No Place to Hide" on Wednesday. Concurrently with the release of the book, Greenwald made public slides that Snowden obtained from the NSA. One of them deals with intelligence relations with Israel.

"Balancing the SIGINT exchange equally between U.S. and Israeli needs has been a constant challenge in the last decade; it arguably tilted heavily in favor of Israeli security concerns. 9/11 came, and went, with NSA's only true Third Party CT relationship being driven almost totally by the needs of the partner," one slide reads.

Another slide states, "The Israelis are extraordinarily good SIGINT partners for us, but … they target us to learn our positions on Middle East problems. A NIE [National Intelligence Estimate] ranked them as the third most aggressive intelligence service against the U.S."

These statements imply that the NSA is providing Israel with information much more than Israel is providing the United States with information.
NSA  Israel  security_&_intelligence  sigint  Glenn_Greenwald 
may 2014 by jerryking
Slides reveal Canada’s powerful espionage tool - The Globe and Mail
COLIN FREEZE and STEPHANIE NOLEN

WASHINGTON and RIO DE JANEIRO — The Globe and Mail

Published Saturday, Oct. 19 2013
CSE  Brazil  sigint  espionage  tools  spycraft 
december 2013 by jerryking
How CSEC became an electronic spying giant - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 30 2013 | The Globe and Mail | COLIN FREEZE.

Next year, the analysts, hackers and linguists who form the heart of Communications Security Establishment Canada are expected to move from their crumbling old campus in Ottawa to a gleaming new, $1-billion headquarters....Today, CSEC (pronounced like “seasick” ever since “Canada” was appended to the CSE brand) has evolved into a different machine: a deeply complex, deep-pocketed spying juggernaut that has seen its budget balloon to almost half a billion dollars and its ranks rise to more than 2,100 staff....You don’t have to understand the technology of modern spying to grasp the motivations behind it.

“When our Prime Minister goes abroad, no matter where he goes, what would be a boon for him to know?” said John Adams, chief of CSEC from 2005 through early 2012. “Do you think that they aren’t doing this to us?”...Electronic spying is expensive. Keeping hackers out of Canadian government computer systems, running some of the world’s fastest supercomputers and storing data in bulk costs money. Mr. Adams even made a point of hiring top mathematicians, with salaries exceeding his own, so CSEC could better crack encryption....CSEC also has a hungry clientele strewn across the federal bureaucracy. An internal document obtained by The Globe names a few of the customers: “CSEC provides intelligence reporting to over 1,000 clients across government, including the Privy Council Office, DND, Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Treasury Board Secretariat, CSIS and the RCMP.”
PCO  DND  CSIS  RCMP  Treasury_Board  Colin_Freeze  CSE  sigint  security_&_intelligence  cyber_warfare  cyber_security  Five_Eyes  Edward_Snowden  oversight  encryption  mathematics  GoC  intelligence_analysts 
december 2013 by jerryking
Eyes Everywhere
Autumn 2013 | University of Toronto Magazine |By Scott Anderson
NSA  security_&_intelligence  uToronto  CSE  surveillance  sigint 
november 2013 by jerryking
Canadian embassies eavesdrop, leak says - The Globe and Mail
COLIN FREEZE

The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 29 2013

In 1995, former CSEC employee Mike Frost wrote in his memoir, Spyworld, that he set up “listening posts” at Canadian embassies. His book says CSEC signals intelligence technicians during the Cold War were funded and mentored by NSA counterparts who taught them how to conceal a piece of spy machinery inside what appeared to be an office safe.
CSE  sigint  security_&_intelligence  NSA  Five_Eyes  diplomacy  espionage  eavesdropping  books  memoirs 
october 2013 by jerryking
Asian countries demand answers over reports of spying from embassies
Oct. 31 2013 | The Globe and Mail |

A document from National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden, published this week by German magazine Der Spiegel, describes a signals intelligence program called “Stateroom” in which U.S., British, Australian and Canadian embassies secretly house surveillance equipment to collect electronic communications. Those countries, along with New Zealand, have an intelligence-sharing agreement known as “Five Eyes.”
NSA  diplomacy  Asian  Australia  New_Zealand  Edward_Snowden  sigint  security_&_intelligence  Five_Eyes 
october 2013 by jerryking
Spying Known at Top Levels, Officials Say - NYTimes.com
October 29, 2013 | NYT | By MARK LANDLER and MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT.

Mr. Clapper and the agency’s director, Gen. Keith B. Alexander, vigorously rejected suggestions that the agency was a rogue institution, trawling for information on ordinary citizens and leaders of America’s closest allies, without the knowledge of its Washington overseers.

Their testimony came amid mounting questions about how the N.S.A. collects information overseas, with Republicans and Democrats calling for a congressional review, lawmakers introducing a bill that would curb its activities and Mr. Obama poised to impose his own constraints, particularly on monitoring the leaders of friendly nations. At the same time, current and former American intelligence officials say there is a growing sense of anger with the White House for what they see as attempts to pin the blame for the controversy squarely on them.

General Alexander said news media reports that the N.S.A. had vacuumed up tens of millions of telephone calls in France, Italy and Spain were “completely false.” That data, he said, is at least partly collected by the intelligence services of those countries and provided to the N.S.A.

Still, both he and Mr. Clapper said that spying on foreign leaders — even those of allies — was a basic tenet of intelligence tradecraft and had gone on for decades. European countries, Mr. Clapper said, routinely seek to listen in on the conversations of American leaders.
security_&_intelligence  espionage  Europe  sigint  NSA  leaders  eavesdropping  spymasters  James_Clapper  spycraft 
october 2013 by jerryking
Obama calls Hollande as U.S. spy scandal widens to include France - The Globe and Mail
DEB RIECHMANN and KIMBERLY DOZIER

WASHINGTON — The Associated Press

Published Monday, Oct. 21 2013,

U.S. President Barack Obama called French President François Hollande on Monday and discussed France’s anger over reported aggressive surveillance tactics by the National Security Agency...Keeping tabs on allies is classic spy craft but the sweep and scope of the NSA program have irritated Germany, Britain, Brazil, and most recently Mexico and France....The report in Le Monde, co-written by Glenn Greenwald, who originally revealed the surveillance program based on leaks from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, found that when certain numbers were used, the conversations were automatically recorded. The surveillance operation also swept up text messages based on key words, Le Monde reported, based on records from Dec. 10 to Jan 7.

The French government, which wants the surveillance to cease, also renewed demands for talks on protection of personal data.
Obama  espionage  security_&_intelligence  NSA  sigint  France  French  surveillance  spycraft  eavesdropping 
october 2013 by jerryking
‘Cyberwar’ allegations threaten rift between Brazil and Canada
Oct. 07 2013 | The Globe and Mail | STEPHANIE NOLEN, COLIN FREEZE AND STEVEN CHASE.
Martin Rudner, a former Carleton University professor, said Canadian defence ministers have spent decades directing CSEC to collect foreign intelligence – including intelligence acquired through economic espionage.

He said Brazil could be a long-term strategic target, given its emerging oil resources could potentially cut into the market for Alberta oil. Probing the Brazilian energy ministry’s data would be one way for Ottawa to figure out the scale of that economic threat, Mr. Rudner said.

According to the Fantastico exposé, CSEC may have been trying to hack into an encrypted government server in Brazil that hosts correspondence between government officials and corporations. “These are state conversations, government strategies which no one should be able to eavesdrop upon,” Brazilian Energy Minister Edison Lobao was quoted as saying.

The leaked documents – all stamped “CSEC – Advanced Network Tradecraft”– yield intriguing glances into the previously unexplored world of Canadian cyberespionage, a world where disparate bits of data are painstakingly amassed in hopes of seeing what happens on a given “target’s” smarthphone or e-mail chains.
espionage  CSE  Brazil  cyber_warfare  cyber_security  Dilma_Rousseff  diplomacy  sigint  spycraft  Ottawa 
october 2013 by jerryking
The slides that came in from Brazil
Oct. 07 2013 | The Globe and Mail |editorials.

Brazil is entitled to an explanation from the Canadian government about what appear to be plans for economic espionage on the Brazilian Ministry of Mines and Energy (and consequently on Brazilian companies) by the Communications Security Establishment Canada. And Canadian citizens are entitled to a clear, principled statement of the views of the CSEC and the Canadian government as a whole on what kinds of economic intelligence they believe themselves to be justified in collecting....CSEC’s signals-intelligence activities should not, as a general rule, be put in the service of private companies, either Canadian or foreign. Canadian competitiveness is of course a desirable goal, but one essential element of fair competition, internationally as well as within a home country, is that it should not be deceptive or fraudulent.

Reports over the years have suggested that CSEC has provided the government with economic intelligence in trade negotiations. If so, the practice is dubious. Trade is not war, and trade negotiations should be carried on in good faith – with elements of strategy on both sides.
Brazil  mining  Canadian  security_&_intelligence  editorials  espionage  cyber_security  CSE  sigint  metadata  GoC 
october 2013 by jerryking
Snowden's Questionable New Turn - NYTimes.com
June 17, 2013, 4:02 pm 52 Comments
Snowden’s Questionable New Turn
By DAVID FIRESTONE
NSA  whistleblowing  security_&_intelligence  sigint  espionage  Edward_Snowden 
june 2013 by jerryking
Sharpen those little grey cells
October 3, 2001 |Globe & Mail | By WESLEY WARK.
Canada can‘t join the war on terrorism or protect itself unless we upgrade our intelligence capabilities, says international security analyst....And Ottawa must create a Canadian foreign intelligence service, similar to the CIA or Britain‘s Secret Intelligence Service, the SIS. Canada is the only G8 nation without such a service. This hampers our ability to understand foreign developments, and to contribute meaningfully to any global war on terrorism. At the moment, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) has a limited mandate for foreign-intelligence collection, is tied up in red tape and hamstrung by lack of resources and expertise. As we debate the creation of a Canadian secret service, we must decide whether CSIS is the appropriate body to take on this difficult mission.

The most secretive institution in the Canadian security and intelligence community is the Communications Security Establishment (CSE), a bland title that hides an institution responsible for foreign-communications intelligence and the protection of government-communications networks. It will need more resources and a significant technological upgrade to operate at the same level as its sister organizations, the National Security Agency in the United States and GCHQ (Government Communications Headquarters) in the United Kingdom.
security_&_intelligence  CSIS  Wesley_Wark  9/11  CSE  self-protection  sigint  GCHQ  NSA  intelligence_analysts 
july 2012 by jerryking
“Our Home and Wired Land”
by Stevie Cameron
EspionageFrom the February 2005 magazine
by Stevie Cameron | The Walrus | February 2005

There is Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Thomas Powers, author of Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda. Another is Markus Ederer, a real star as the deputy director of analysis at the Bundesnachrichtendienst, the German secret service. E
Canadian  security_&_intelligence  espionage  Wesley_Wark  books  cyber_security  CSIS  CSE  sigint  spycraft  Stevie_Cameron  humint  Pulitzer_Prize 
may 2012 by jerryking
In Kim Jong-il Death, an Extensive Intelligence Failure - NYTimes.com
By MARK LANDLER and CHOE SANG-HUN
Published: December 19, 2011

“We have clear plans about what to do if North Korea attacks, but not if the North Korean regime unravels,” said Michael J. Green, a former Asia adviser in the Bush administration. “Every time you do these scenarios, one of the first objectives is trying to find out what’s going on inside North Korea.”

In many countries, that would involve intercepting phone calls between government officials or peering down from spy satellites. And indeed, American spy planes and satellites scan the country. Highly sensitive antennas along the border between South and North Korea pick up electronic signals. South Korean intelligence officials interview thousands of North Koreans who defect to the South each year.

And yet remarkably little is known about the inner workings of the North Korean government. Pyongyang, officials said, keeps sensitive information limited to a small circle of officials, who do not talk.
security_&_intelligence  failure  North_Korea  South_Korea  U.S.  SIGINT  scenario-planning  contingency_planning  eavesdropping 
december 2011 by jerryking
Top secret institute comes out of the shadows to recruit top talent
Sep. 05, 2011 | The Globe and Mail | Colin Freeze. While this
“signals-intelligence” agency has its own stable of hundreds of code
makers and code crackers, it often finds itself needing periodic
infusions of cutting-edge academic work to stay current. So, two years
ago, the CSEC hired Hugh Williams, who some describe as a “rock star”
mathematician at the University of Calgary, to lead the effort to put
together the Tutte Institute. Last year, the spy agency built a home for
the institute on its sprawling Ottawa campus.
mathematics  security_&_intelligence  CSE  cryptology  Colleges_&_Universities  espionage  talent  Ottawa  research  sigint 
october 2011 by jerryking
Book review: Cyber War - WSJ.com
APRIL 21, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by GLENN HARLAN
REYNOLDS. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Hacker. The Internet was designed for
easy communication. Security? Not so much.
cyber_warfare  cyber_security  hackers  security_&_intelligence  book_reviews  sigint 
april 2010 by jerryking
Cyber Warriors
March 2010 | The Atlantic Online | James Fallows
Click here to find out more!

When will China emerge as a military threat to the U.S.? In most
respects the answer is: not anytime soon—China doesn’t even contemplate a
time it might challenge America directly. But one significant threat
already exists: cyberwar. Attacks—not just from China but from Russia
and elsewhere—on America’s electronic networks cost millions of dollars
and could in the extreme cause the collapse of financial life, the halt
of most manufacturing systems, and the evaporation of all the data and
knowledge stored on the Internet.

by James Fallows
China  cyber_warfare  security_&_intelligence  James_Fallows  infrastructure  sigint  vulnerabilities  asymmetrical 
february 2010 by jerryking

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