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jerryking : sleuthing   19

'Virtual fieldwork' is no substitute for travel
Oct. 10, 2015| FT | Tyler Brule
From time to time this column takes on the part-time role of concierge for its readers. The requests that come across this desk are not unlike those that greet the men...
travel  due_diligence  concierge_services  market_research  sleuthing  primary_field_research  research_methods  Tyler_Brûlé  interpretation  forecasting 
november 2015 by jerryking
Traders Seek an Edge With High-Tech Snooping - WSJ.com
Dec. 18, 2013 | WSJ | By Michael Rothfeld and Scott Patterson.

A growing industry uses surveillance and data-crunching technology to supply traders with nonpublic information.

Genscape's clients include banks such as Goldman Sachs Group Inc., J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. and Deutsche Bank AG, hedge funds including Citadel LLC and large energy-trading outfits such as Trafigura Beheer BV. Surveillance and analysis of the oil, electricity and natural-gas sectors can run Genscape clients more than $300,000 a year.
surveillance  data_driven  slight_edge  traders  hedge_funds  sleuthing  Genscape  sensors  commodities  corporate_espionage  competitive_intelligence  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  market_research  exclusivity  investment_research  research_methods  LBMA  nonpublic  primary_field_research  banks  Citadel  oil_industry  natural_gas  snooping  alternative_data  informational_advantages  imagery  satellites  infrared  electric_power 
december 2013 by jerryking
Incognito
October 2003 | Report on Business Magazine | by Doug Steiner.

"...He always seemed a step ahead, and he did it by working harder, thinking harder and trading harder—and in ways that the competition couldn't quite grasp."

Steiner's 10 rules for making serious money:

1. Economists say investing is a zero-sum game It isn't. Money moves to smart hands quickly, and lazy investors pay a price. Tiger Woods became the been golfer by practising a lot. How many prospectuses have you read in bed after the news?
2. Really good investors rarely crow. If there is $5 to be made from a trade, there will be loss than $2.50 after you've blabbed about how smart you are. There are traders who quietly take home $10 million a year. They live beside you in a modest house and drive a beat-up Nissan.
3. The best follow rules and they‘re patient. They may not invest for months. One great trader I know wanted to buy a house in a fancy neighbourhood. He spent more than a week in the registry office on his vacation, searching the title on each property in the neighbourhood to find what buyers paid and how much of that was mortgaged, going back 20 wars. He got a good deal. He does the same amount of homework investing.
4. Sharp traders never add to losing positions. Too many headaches.
5. Smart investors. when puzzled about when to sell. wonder if they should buy more. If they don’t think they should buy more,they sell.
6. The most information wins. If you like a company, phone some people who work there. Apply for a job. Try their products. Phone the shipping dock to find out if they're busy.
7. Get a Bloomberg terminal. Bloombergs have more information in them than you can use, but smart people use a lot of it.
8. Following really smart traders around the market is hard. Most have more money to invest in a position than the arbitrage or opportunity can handle. They leave few tracks.
9. Great investors an: like great athletes—they see opportunities that others don’t. Often you don't realize that what they've made the most money on is even fungible.
10. If you can't do it yourself, find someone who likes the foldouts in annual reports more than anything. Their management fees are usually worth it. And they usually don't have slick marketing brochures.
absorptive_capacity  arbitrage  Bay_Street  Bloomberg  dedication  Doug_Steiner  hard_work  hedge_funds  humility  idea_generation  investment_advice  investing  investors  money_management  obscurity  opportunities  overlooked_opportunities  patience  perception  primary_field_research  prospectuses  rules_of_the_game  self-discipline  sleuthing  slight_edge  smart_people  traders  training  unfair_advantages  zero-sum_games 
december 2013 by jerryking
Football's Secret Strategies - WSJ.com
Nov. 29, 2013 | | By Nicholas Dawidoff.

Fans of professional football are used to seeing NFL coaches on the sidelines holding what look like enormous bistro menus in front of their faces. These are "call sheets" for plays, distilled from the week's game plan, and they summarize the tactical choices on which NFL games depend. Because everything in a game plan is a closely guarded secret, most football fans have no real idea what they are watching as coaches and players, communicating through headsets or face to face, share this privileged information.... It was a life of perpetual meetings. Through winter, spring and summer, the coaches pored over film of practices and games, working through the actions of every Jets player and opponent in every play of the previous season, trying to understand why ideas succeeded or failed.

Come fall, the assistant coaches would scour the coming opponent's recent games on film and supply the offensive or defensive coordinator with their thoughts. The advance-scouting department would compile an opposition research dossier for the coaches thick enough that some called it "War and Peace." Teams that had recently beaten the Jets' next opponent were scrutinized; elements of their successful plays might be adapted or lifted outright.
NFL  strategic_thinking  coaching  strategies  secrets  preparation  planning  football  ideas  competitive_intelligence  sleuthing  scouting 
december 2013 by jerryking
To Avoid a Job Failure Learn the Culture of a Company First
July 14, 1998| WSJ |By Hal Lancaster.

The team suggested questions to ask during interviews. How does the company communicate with employees? Does the company encourage employees to learn more about the business? How do people get feed back? How do executives expect to be addressed? What's the company's dress code? What are typical work schedules? How are decisions made? How are raises and promotions decided? Who are the stars, and how did they reach that exalted state?

The consultants also advised employees to take their research beyond the interview. Michael McGinn, President of Executive Transition Group, an executive coaching and outplacement firm, suggested talking to current and former employees and members of professional trade associations to which the company's employees belong.

There are also clues in the stories told in annual reports and other company literature. Look for tales about company heroes to determine what is valued in an employee. Also, read open letters from the leadership and other self-descriptions.
Hal_Lancaster  organizational_culture  failure  first90days  sleuthing  primary_field_research 
december 2012 by jerryking
ASAP Interview_Don Valentine
Forbes ASAP | by Rich Karlgaard.

The great thing about evaluating markets first is that usually there are very poor data sources. So you have to create these scraps of information and most people don't do that--they prefer to make a judgement on some other basis, whether the product is patentable, whether the technology is differentiated, whether the people are world class. To us, you can scrape and push and dig and find out tidbits of information which when you put them together, you get a conviction about when something will happen. You talk to people in distribution, you talk to all the sources of information that you can, and you make a judgment....Are you solving a problem? Are there great installations of incompatibility that need to be linked? Who cares about this product? and do they care with a time frame that's important to us--eight years, the length of a fund?...To me, the most important person in management beyond the president has always been the sales manager. I want to meet and get comfortable with the guy who is going to create the backlog. This is different that marketing. Marketing runs the company, as it should, but it is the sales department that creates the orders and creates the cash-flow. So the sales manager is always a very important character to me, much more important that a log of other people. They must be relentless, driven and have enormous energy. Winning is terribly important to them, Where we've had great successes with companies, we've had great sales managers. Where we've had mediocre success with companies, we've had mediocre sakes managers. Nothing happens if you don't get a backlog.
Sequoia  Don_Valentine  Rich_Karlgaard  due_diligence  sleuthing  information_sources  sales  tacit_data  scuttlebutt  incompatibilities  primary_field_research 
june 2012 by jerryking
Snooping in the Age of E-book - This Life - NYTimes.com
September 23, 2011 |NYT| By BRUCE FEILER. How does one snoop
bookshelves in the age of e-book?...a bit of gumshoe in someone’s
cupboard or closet can reveal far more about them than an entire
evening’s worth of chitchat. “Places reflect long series of behavior,”
“If I have a conversation with you, I just get snippets of behavior.
Your books, your chairs, your wall hangings represent an accumulation
over many yrs. A space distills repeated acts. That’s why it’s hard to
fake.” …A perfect storm of clues is what makes bookshelf sleuthing so
appealing — and so difficult to replicate elsewhere in a home. “The
kitchen & pantry are pretty good,” …“But they don’t interest me as
much as a person’s bookshelf,” because the kitchen and pantry are
reflection of how the person eats, whereas the bookcase is reflection of
how he thinks.”… For all the benefits of snooping, the activity does
present certain ethical quandaries. Is it O.K. to look in someone’s
closet? Their medicine cabinet? Their iPad?
sleuthing  books  personal_libraries  e-books  artifacts  physical_place  primary_field_research  snooping 
september 2011 by jerryking
Nice Guys, Naughty Information? - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | Holman W. Jenkins,
Jr. The SEC wants to help small investors? Stop trying to criminalize
data-gathering.
SEC  insider_information  insider_trading  sleuthing  investors 
november 2010 by jerryking
You have your values; How do you identify your employer's?
Apr 8, 1997 | Wall Street Journal. pg. B.1 | by Hal Lancaster.
How to assess a prospective employer's values before accepting a job?
Managing_Your_Career  Hal_Lancaster  organizational_culture  sleuthing  howto  values  job_search  managing_up 
september 2010 by jerryking
Get smart: scooping the competition in six easy steps—without breaking the law | Managing | Strategy | Canadian Business Online
December 27, 2004 | From Canadian Business Online |
Gathering competitive intelligence is all too often confused with
corporate espionage, but practitioners say it really has nothing to do
with planting a mole inside your competitor's HQ or hacking into a
computer system. After all, that's against the law. Still, there are
perfectly legal, ethical and effective ways to find out what your
competitors are doing.
competitive_intelligence  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  market_research  sleuthing  moles 
february 2010 by jerryking
Finding exclusive information is tough, but rewarding
May 28, 2005 | Globe & Mail | by AVNER MANDELMAN. Superior
investment information must be triple-good: It must be true, important
and exclusive. "We called or met 13 HTE clients, which took two months,
and a dozen low- and mid-level employees, which took another month.
Because the latter live paycheque to paycheque, they take pains to learn
how their company is really doing. What we learned was crucial -- few
things are more important than clients' opinions. And it was exclusive,
no one else talked to the workers and clients."
exclusivity  sleuthing  due_diligence  Avner_Mandelman  investment_research  inequality_of_information  scuttlebutt  primary_field_research  personal_knowledge  personal_connections  personal_meetings  personal_relationships 
february 2010 by jerryking
How to tell good buys from bad: Talk to people, trust your gut
Jun 3, 2006 | Globe & Mail | by Avner Mandelman. 2 mths
ago Giraffe put an ad in RoB, looking for a research analyst. We asked
for a 1-pg. résumé, a half-pg. letter, and a 1-pg. tech stock pick/pan.
All presented themselves well, and some even gave interesting stock
picks/pans. Two things were missing: First, nearly all had based their
analysis on public, 2nd-hand data -- the kind that everyone else sees
also. Very few did primary field research and none thought it important
to highlight exclusive info. Instead, the recommendations were rife
with data copied from the Web, corporate filings or famous analysts'
reports. The interviewees saw their role as financial scientists
massaging data gathered by others, rather than gatherers of exclusive
info themselves. Second, very few spoke of the company's people: the
character of their pick's CEO, the trustworthiness of the CFO, or the
high integrity of the company's team viz. a viz the competition. This
lack of people-mention was glaring.

===========================================
A technique for finding out information about companies. When you talk to people , you do not ask them to talk about their company. What you do is ask them to talk about the other company. That is not reg FD or insider information per se. It is their observations on the generalized business conditions and what the other companies are doing. Folks like to shoot their mouths off about other people
Avner_Mandelman  research_methods  hiring  sleuthing  due_diligence  proprietary  exclusivity  primary_field_research  secondary_research  research_analysts  gut_feelings 
february 2010 by jerryking
To get an investment edge, learn to recognize business stars
Feb 10, 2007 | The Globe & Mail pg. B.9 | by Avner
Mandelman. Therefore, if you invest, see yourself as a business fan, and
pay attention to individual business stars: Follow their careers, learn
what they do and how they do it, what they succeed in and where they
fail -- and try to remember what they look like. If you do that, you'll
often have an edge over those who don't. Sure, you must know the
numbers, too, and the industry. But if you can identify a young
business-Kobe-Bryant joining -- or quitting -- a company, you may take
the money of those who only see a press release. Star talent matters
greatly, both in sports, and in business.
Avner_Mandelman  sleuthing  scuttlebutt  proprietary  star_power  slight_edge  Bay_Street  sports  Pablo_Picasso  talent  personal_knowledge  pay_attention 
february 2010 by jerryking
Turing was right: Don't be ruled by words and numbers
January 13, 2007 | Globe & Mail | by AVNER MANDELMAN.
Numbers alone aren't enough. You must seek out physical facts too,
because that's where the exclusive edge is. But if you have read this
column before, surely you know all this. So why am I mentioning it
again? Because when I interviewed analysts prior to hiring one, I found
that fresh MBAs or those with a CFA designation have never been taught
to do physical sleuthing. In fact the entire CFA material never mentions
physical investigation. It's all done by numbers and letters -- which
are, of course, reflections of reality, not physical reality itself.
The implicit assumption then is that screen blips and printed matter can
capture the full human drama of commercial conflict -- which, after
all, is what business truly is. But is this assumption valid? Can
letters and numbers alone tell you whether a company's president is
competent and trustworthy?
Avner_Mandelman  sleuthing  proprietary  due_diligence  scuttlebutt  physical_place  personal_knowledge 
february 2010 by jerryking
Finding competitive intelligence on Internet start-up companies: a study of secondary resource use and information-seeking processes
October 2001| Information Research, Vol. 7 No. 1 | by Sanda
Erdelez, School of Information Science and Learning Technologies,
University of Missouri-Columbia and Nicole Ware, Graduate School of
Library and Information Science,
University of Texas at Austin.
competitive_intelligence  start_ups  market_research  sleuthing  due_diligence  scuttlebutt  secondary_research 
october 2009 by jerryking
Stock Sleuthing 101: Talk to the company's customers
June 30, 2007 column by AVNER MANDELMAN counseling investors to
avoid fixating on the numerical side of the analysis to the detriment
of talking to a company's customers to understand truly the business'
strength or franchise.
stocks  Avner_Mandelman  market_research  sleuthing  personal_knowledge  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  biases  stockmarkets  primary_field_research 
january 2009 by jerryking

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