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jerryking : small-scale   3

BlackRock to Push Wall Street Chat Tool - WSJ
By JUSTIN BAER and SARAH KROUSE
June 23, 2016

At Goldman Sachs Group Inc., a Symphony investor that contributed its own messaging developments to the platform, the service is now used by most of the firm’s employees across all of its businesses, according to a person familiar with the situation. Goldman traders, for instance, use Symphony to communicate with back-office employees charged with settling trades.

Elsewhere, though, Symphony remains little used or, in some cases, virtually unknown.

Of about a dozen employees reached at financial firms that have invested in the service, some were only aware of small-scale pilot programs in specific corners of their trading floors.

The lack of broader takeup has sown doubts that Symphony would become an alternative to Bloomberg’s multipronged service that costs financial firms $22,000 to $25,000 per employee a year. After attracting bankers and investors to its chat service, Symphony aims to pipe in data, news and other tools, coming closer to the array of functions Bloomberg provides. Symphony charges companies $15 a month per user for the chat service.
BlackRock  messaging  Symphony  Bloomberg  Goldman_Sachs  pilot_programs  traders  back-office  small-scale  chat  Communicating_&_Connecting 
june 2016 by jerryking
Lack of investment is the real tragedy in Africa
June 10 2005 | FT | By Kurt Hoffman.

The moral question of our time has little to do with public money and everything to do with private capital.

The calls for rich taxpayers' money to eliminate poverty, either as debt relief or as aid, drown out the whoosh of billions of dollars of private capital that is circling the globe, looking for a place to land and multiply. The real tragedy is that only 1 per cent of it finds its way to sub-Saharan Africa.

This vote of no confidence in Africa on the part of global investors is seen by some as a justification for doubling aid. But this is confounded by the fact that Africa delivers some of the highest returns on investment on the planet.

Even more intriguing: despite the misperception that capital shortages are holding back development, banks across east, west and sub-Saharan Africa are actually flush with money. Yet they refuse to lend it to those who can do the most with it: millions of disenfranchised, small-scale African entrepreneurs who could lift Africa out of poverty if given half a chance.
Africa  investments  sub-Saharan_Africa  investors  ROI  private_equity  misperceptions  disenfranchisement  mom-and-pop  capital_shortages  small-scale  entrepreneur 
august 2012 by jerryking
Companies close to home need your help
Nov. 2, 2011 | The Financial Times p12.| Luke Johnson.

Two recent books, independently published on either side of the Atlantic, have each drawn parallels between the "slow food" movement and the idea of investing locally. The slow food concept was pioneered in Italy in 1986, to champion small-scale producers and regional ingredients, as a backlash against global fast-food operators such as McDonald's. Now this philosophy is being extended to the financial sector.

The British title is Slow Finance: why investment miles matter by Gervais Williams,
The US book is Locavesting: the revolution in local investing and how to profit from it , by Amy Cortese.

the City of London is largely failing as a provider of capital for British business. The new-issue market for domestic companies has almost disappeared in recent years - all the activity is in trading second-hand shares and floating overseas companies like mining concerns from Africa or Russia. So if mainstream investing institutions such as pension funds are not backing British enterprise, then individuals should look to channel their savings directly into local ventures. For just as a society that won't reproduce commits a form of suicide, so if we fail to invest in our own industries, then we face inevitable economic decline.
local  locavore  investing  books  crowd_funding  Luke_Johnson  microproducers  slow_food  backlash  investors  economic_decline  London  small-scale  finance  funding  fin-tech  decline 
november 2011 by jerryking

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