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Apple and Qualcomm’s Billion-Dollar Staredown
April 13, 2019 | WSJ | By Tripp Mickle and Asa Fitch.

Apple has called Qualcomm a monopoly and said Mr. Mollenkopf has lied about settlement talks between the companies. Qualcomm has accused Apple of deceiving regulators around the world and stealing software to help a rival chip maker.

For two years, the companies have bickered over the royalties Apple pays to Qualcomm for its patents. Discord between the CEOs, who bring different management styles and principles to the table, has deepened the divide. They have dug into their positions as the dispute has escalated....Apple’s patent lawsuit against Qualcomm is set to go to trial—with both CEOs expected to testify in a case where billions of dollars are at stake. .....Cook’s view that Qualcomm’s licensing practices—taking a 5% share of most of the sales price of an iPhone—was just plain wrong, allowing the chip maker to profit off Apple innovations in display and camera technology.....
5G  Apple  CEOs  conflict_resolution  disputes  Intel  licensing  litigation  mobile_phones  patents  Qualcomm  royalties  semiconductors  smartphones  Steve_Mollenkopf  Tim_Cook 
april 2019 by jerryking
With the iPhone Sputtering, Apple Bets Its Future on TV and News
March 25, 2019 | WSJ | By Tripp Mickle.

The iPhone is running out of juice. To go beyond the device that made Apple Inc. a global colossus, Tim Cook is betting on a suite of services—marking the company’s biggest shift in more than a decade......Apple will take a giant leap forward announcing video- and news-subscription services that it hopes will generate billions of dollars in new annual revenue and deepen ties between iPhone users and the company.....apps and services, from Spotify to Netflix to China’s WeChat , have often become more important to users than the devices that run them. .....The company’s ambition in video is to become an alternative to cable, combining original series with shows from other networks to create a new entertainment service that can reach more than 100 markets world-wide. ....Apple hasn’t said what it will charge for the programming. .....The original series will be delivered in a new TV app that staff have been calling a Netflix killer.....Apple has been negotiating to bring its new TV app to multiple platforms, including Roku and smart TVs.........Apple plans to showcase a revamped News app that includes a premium tier with access to more than 200 magazines—including Bon Appétit, People and Glamour—as well as newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal.....The Washington Post and New York Times aren’t participating in the new app...... in the early 2000s, co-founder Steve Jobs reinvented the company by pushing it into mobile devices. The iPod and its accompanying iTunes service revived a company that was largely dependent on Mac computer sales....Mr. Cook is attempting a similar feat in the approaching twilight of the smartphone era....Cook wanted to know which apps were selling well, how many Apple Music subscribers stuck with the service, and how many people were signing up for iCloud storage.....Apple’s biggest source of services revenue comes from distributing other companies’ software through its App Store.....Apple’s music-streaming service has about 50 million global subscribers—far behind Spotify’s 96 million.

Apple’s base of 1.4 billion iPhones, iPads and Macs in use globally gives it a distribution platform..................The push into news subscriptions could help Apple battle Facebook, whose News Feed has helped it become the No. 1 app world-wide in monthly active smartphone users.....Facebook is attempting to become a super-app like China’s WeChat, which allows users to shop, order food, buy movie tickets and make reservations on any mobile operating system......Steve Jobs foreshadowed Apple’s services future when he started iTunes in 2001, offering categories from competing major labels to make the first successful digital-music store, with songs available for 99 cents.

For Mr. Cook’s monthly services meetings, the company monitors of apps that benefit and threaten Apple. There is a "release radar" for Cook to track apps that are expected to sell well and other metrics for the apps that have challenged Apple’s business, including iTunes sales decreases compared with Apple Music subscription growth.
App_Store  Apple  Apple_IDs  Apple_Music  big_bets  CEOs  cloud_computing  Disney  iCloud  iPhone  iTunes  magazines  mobile_applications  multiplatforms  Netflix  news  NYT  original_content  pivots  platforms  services  smartphones  Spotify  storage  streaming  subscriptions  television  Tim_Cook  WaPo  WeChat 
march 2019 by jerryking
Meg Whitman: ‘Businesses need to think, who’s coming to kill me?’
January 18, 2019 | Financial Times | by Rana Foroohar 7 HOURS AGO.

Whitman has just launched Quibi, a $1bn start-up of which she is chief executive (entertainment mogul Jeffrey Katzenberg, her co-founder, is chairman). The venture, backed by a host of entertainment, tech and finance groups including 21st Century Fox, Viacom, Alibaba, Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan, has the lofty aim of becoming the Netflix of the mobile generation, offering high-quality, bite-sized video content for millennials (and the rest of us) hooked on smartphones......Whitman's experience has left her with plenty of advice for chief executives struggling with nearly every kind of disruption — technological, cultural and geopolitical. “I think every big business needs to be thinking, ‘Who’s coming to kill me?’ Where are the big markets that for regulatory reasons, or just because things are being done the way they always have been, disruption is likely? I’d say healthcare is one,” ...... a “Quibi”, is the new company’s “snackable” videos, designed to be consumed in increments of a few minutes....“You have all these in-between moments, and that’s what inspired the length of the content,” she says. “Very few people are watching long-form content on this device,” she says, holding up her iPhone. “They’re spending four to five hours a day on their phones, but they’re playing games, watching YouTube videos, checking social media, and surfing the internet. And although [people] pick up their phones hundreds of times a day, the average session length is 6.5 minutes.”.......Whitman’s hope is that just as people now binge on hour-long episodes of The Crown or House of Cards at home, they’ll do the same on their smartphone while in the doctor’s office, or commuting, or waiting for a meeting to start. As Whitman puts it, “every day you walk around with a little television in your pocket.” She and Katzenberg are betting that by the end of this year, we’ll spend some of our “in-between moments” watching micro-instalments of mobile movies produced by Oscar winning film-makers or stars ... interviewing other stars. ....The wind was at her back at eBay, where she became president and chief executive in 1998, presiding over a decade in which the company’s annual revenues grew from $4m to $8bn. “It’s hard to change consumer behaviour. We did that at eBay. We taught people how to buy in any auction format on the internet, how to send money 3,000 miles across the country and hope that you got the product.”

Quibi, she believes, doesn’t require that shift. “People are already watching a lot of videos on their phones. You just need to create a different experience.” She lays out how the company will optimise video for phones in ways that (she claims) will utterly change the viewing experience, and will leverage Katzenberg’s 40 years in the business.

..
paranoia  CEOs  disruption  Meg_Whitman  Rana_Foroohar  start_ups  women  bite-sized  Hollywood  Jeffrey_Katzenberg  mobile  subscriptions  web_video  high-quality  smartphones  advice  large_companies  large_markets  interstitial  Quibi 
january 2019 by jerryking
Can Smartphones Stop the Death of the Salesman? - WSJ
By Khadeeja Safdar | Photographs by Dominick Reuter for The Wall Street Journal
April 15, 2018 8:00 a.m
smartphones  retailers  mens'_clothing  suits  apparel  salespeople  bricks-and-mortar 
april 2018 by jerryking
Staying connected: car makers race to offer remote-control functions - The Globe and Mail
PETER NOWAK
CHICAGO
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
LAST UPDATED: TUESDAY, JUL. 25, 2017

BMW, for one, is charging hard toward remote-control functions. The Munich-based company’s new Connected+ app, recently previewed for press, will allow drivers to look up routes on their phones and send them directly to their car’s navigation system, share live trip status and location with contacts and remotely see what’s going on around their vehicle.

With the Connected+ app, drivers can share live trip status and location with contacts.

The trip-status sharing feature can show friends or family members exactly where a driver is via a private website and provides continually updating arrival-time estimates. The remote monitoring ability, meanwhile, uses the car’s cameras to build a three-dimensional view of the car’s surroundings. The real-time image can then be viewed remotely on a smartphone.

The app can also provide drivers with walking directions to their destinations once they leave their vehicle and automatically add nearby gas stations to navigational routes if it detects that the car is running low.

The Connected+ app will work with cars in production as of this month and will be compatible later this year with older vehicles using versions five or six of BMW’s iDrive computer system......BMW’s chief competitors, Audi and Mercedez-Benz, have similar apps – MMI Connect and Mercedes me, respectively – that allow drivers to remotely access and precondition their vehicles. Industry analysts expect both car makers are also working on adding additional features, a trend that is being fuelled by growing expectations from consumers for continually updating products.

The trend began with smartphones and mobile apps, but became popular with Tesla owners when the electric-car manufacturer started offering over-the-air software updates. Other car makers are now seeing that such updates can significantly raise customer-satisfaction levels.

“You get this sense that they are dedicated to giving you an experience platform and not just this list of things that you get when you buy the car,” Mr. Ramsay says. “Now, when you buy it, that list may be ever-growing.”
connected_devices  smartphones  mobile_applications  BMW  Audi  connected_cars  Mercedes  remote_monitoring 
july 2017 by jerryking
Amazon’s Next Big Move: Take Over the Mall
November 14, 2016 | Technology Review | by Nicholas Carr .

What’s Amazon doing with Amazon Books?...Wall Street analysts and tech writers have filled the void with conjecture. The stores are all about selling gadgets, goes one popular idea, with the books there just to lure customers. The stores are data-gathering machines, goes another, enabling Amazon to extend its tracking of customers into the physical world. Or maybe the company’s secret plan is to use the stores to promote its cloud computing operation, Amazon Web Services, to other retailers....The theories are intriguing, and they may contain bits of truth. But the real impetus behind the stores is probably much simpler: Amazon wants to sell more books....Not long ago, the common wisdom held that Amazon would remake the book business in its own image. Its Web store would kill off bookstores, and its Kindle would render physical books obsolete. ...
“Pure-play Web retailing is not sustainable.”Bezos underestimated the allure of bricks and paper. With his bookstore chain, he now seems to be admitting that if Amazon is to expand its share of the book market, it will need to invest in bricks as well as bits....Having come up short in its plan to supplant books and bookstores with digital alternatives, the company is taking its revenge by attacking traditional bookshops on their own turf. Unlike the mom-and-pop independents, or even the struggling Barnes & Noble chain, Amazon has the scale and the cash required to wage a war of attrition. It can sustain losses on its stores for a long time.....Amazon Books may be just the vanguard of a much broader push into brick-and-mortar retailing by the company. In October, the Wall Street Journal revealed that Amazon is planning to open a chain of convenience stores, mainly for groceries, along with drive-in depots where consumers will be able to pick up merchandise ordered online. It has also begun rolling out small “pop-up” stores to hawk its electronic devices. It already has more than two dozen such kiosks in malls around the country, and dozens more are said to be in the works.

Even after 20 years of rapid growth, e-commerce still accounts for less than 10 percent of total retail sales. And now the rise of mobile computing places new constraints on Web stores.At the same time, the smartphone, with its apps, its messaging platforms, and its constant connectivity, gives retailers more ways to communicate with and influence customers, even when they’re shopping in stores. This is why the big trend in retailing today is toward “omnichannel” strategies, which blend physical stores, Web stores, and mobile apps in a way that makes the most of the convenience of smartphones and overcomes their limitations.....Beyond its expertise in Web sales, Amazon brings distinctive strengths to an omnichannel operation. Its vast, efficient network of warehouses and distribution centers can supply outlets and process returns. It has, thanks to the largesse and patience of its investors, a reservoir of cheap capital that it can draw on to fund a building spree. And it has a much-admired brand. What Amazon lacks is experience in the touchy-feely world of traditional retailing (e.g. merchandising??). The company’s proficiency in software and data crunching is unquestioned. Its people skills are another matter..... another of the store’s goals: to promote the Prime program, which is central to Amazon’s strategy of locking in customers....I feel let down. I had convinced myself that I was going to witness something fresh and unexpected at Amazon Books. What I found was an annex to a website—a store that, despite the bricks and paper, retains the coldness of the virtual.
e-commerce  shopping_malls  Amazon  Amazon_Prime  books  sterile  soulless  Nicholas_Carr  Amazon_Books  bricks-and-mortar  Jeff_Bezos  pure-plays  bookstores  omnichannel  strengths  smartphones  mobile_applications  loyalty_management  impersonal  people_skills  Achilles’_heel  weaknesses  convenience_stores  pop-ups  kiosks  voids  merchandising  AWS  physical_world  mom-and-pop  coldness  touchy-feely  cyberphysical  emotional_connections  empathy_vacuum  Amazon_Go  cashierless  locked_in  distribution_centres 
february 2017 by jerryking
Moving targets; Smartphones and tablets
What advertisers love, and what they hate, about mobile devices

MARKETERS' MANTRA OF reaching "the right person, with the right message, at the right time" has become a lot more achievable in the p...
geofencing  location_based_services  native_advertising  advertising  mobile_phones  mobile  smartphones  tablet_computing  beacons  the_right_people 
february 2017 by jerryking
Little Brother
Sep 11th 2014 | The Economist | Alexandra Suich.

In 1963 David Ogilvy, the father of Madison Avenue and author of a classic business book, “Confessions of an Advertising Man”, wrote: “An advertisement is like a radar sweep, constantly hunting new prospects as they come into the market. Get a good radar, and keep it sweeping.”.....Behavioural profiling has gone viral across the internet, enabling firms to reach users with specific messages based on their location, interests, browsing history and demographic group......Extreme personalisation in advertising has been slow to come... online advertising space is unlimited and prices are low, so making money is not as easy as it was in the offline world,.....Digital advertising is being buoyed by three important trends. The first is the rise of mobile devices, such as smartphones....The second, related trend is the rise of social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, which have become an important navigation system for people looking for content across the web. ......The third big development has been the rise of real-time bidding, or “programmatic buying”, a new system for targeting consumers precisely and swiftly with online adverts. Publishers, advertisers and intermediaries can now bid for digital ads electronically and direct them to specific consumers at lightning speed.....The lines between established media businesses are becoming blurred. Richard Edelman, the boss of Edelman, a public-relations firm, describes the media and advertising business as a “mosh pit”. .... clients’ biggest question is whether people will even notice their ads. ...This special report will show that technology is profoundly changing the dynamics of advertising. Building on the vast amount of data produced by consumers’ digital lives, it is giving more power to media companies that have a direct relationship with their customers and can track them across different devices. ....Consumers may gain from advertising tailored to their particular needs, and so far most of them seem content to accept the ensuing loss of privacy. But companies are sensitive to the potential costs of overstepping the mark. As the head of one British advertising firm puts it: “Once people realise what’s happening, I can’t imagine there won’t be pushback.”
Facebook  Twitter  Pinterest  Ogilvy_&_Mather  David_Ogilvy  behavioural_targeting  pushback  books  effectiveness  haystacks  privacy  native_advertising  ad-tech  Conversant  Kraft  personalization  trends  mobile_phones  smartphones  social_media  real-time  auctions  programmatic  advertising  online_advertising  Omnicom 
february 2017 by jerryking
Mobile Ad Targeting Is Improving, According to Nielsen - WSJ
By JACK MARSHALL
Nov. 22, 2016

Ad targeting accuracy varied based on the demographic groups that campaigns were aimed at, however. For example, desktop ads performed better than mobile ads when targeting broader age ranges.

Conversely, Nielsen said mobile campaigns were more effective in connecting with narrower audiences. For example, for campaigns aimed at people aged between 18 and 34, 63% of mobile ads reached their intended demographic target, compared with 53% on desktop.

Despite advances in targeting technology, Nielsen said it remains highly unlikely that digital ad campaigns could ever achieve a 100% on-target percentage, because of consumer behaviors such as misrepresenting their age or gender, or sharing digital devices with family and friends.
mobile_phones  smartphones  advertising  targeting  LBMA  Nielsen  consumer_behavior  misrepresentation  demographic_information 
february 2017 by jerryking
Why Starbucks Might Be Innovating Too Fast - Barron's
By Alex Eule Jan. 26, 2017

Big Picture: Starbucks is seeing rapid success with its mobile ordering system, but it might be coming at the expense of in-store service.......The company now has so many customers placing advance orders via smartphones that some of its stores are having trouble keeping up.... “mobile order and pay” made up 7% of U.S. transactions in the latest quarter, up from just 3% a year ago.

But, it turns out, the existing stores haven’t been set up to handle the changing consumer behavior.

(From personal experience, I’ve noticed that Manhattan Starbucks counters are often over-filled with advance orders and those customers walk in and out, while the wait for in-store service is now longer than before.)

Starbucks president and chief operating officer Kevin Johnson, who’s set to become CEO in April, told investors that smartphone order volume has “created a new operational challenge...significant congestion at the handoff point. This congestion resulted in some number of customers who either entered the store or considered visiting a Starbucks store, and then did not complete a transaction.”
innovation  Starbucks  congestion  handoffs  in-store  order_management_system  mobile_applications  smartphones  consumer_behavior  operations  wait_times  brands  large_companies  shortcomings  revenge_effects  the_big_picture 
january 2017 by jerryking
Smartphones on wheels | The Economist
Sep 6th 2014 |

the rise of the “connected” car. This is the coming together of communications technologies, information systems and safety devices to provide vehicles with an increasing level of sophistication and automation. It is a process that will change not just how cars are used but also the relationship between a car and its driver. This, in turn, will affect the way vehicles are made and sold. Eventually, it is the connected car that may deliver a driverless future....Connected cars are a marriage of two types of mobile technology: the mechanical sort, which revolutionised transport in the 20th century, and the electronic variety, which has transformed telecoms in the 21st. A recent report by analysts at Citigroup, a bank, used data from IHS, a research firm, to divide the ways that mobile telecoms are influencing motoring into three useful groups.
technology  connected_devices  automotive_industry  connected_cars  smartphones  mobile_applications  location_based_services  LBMA  automobile  automotive  autonomous_vehicles 
september 2015 by jerryking
Baltimore live streams riots with Periscope app - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 30 2015|G&M| Shane Dingman.

live, unfiltered moments streamed for an audience in the millions. Citizens and journalists have spent the week capturing and sharing moments on Vine, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and a new breed of live-video apps like Periscope and Meerkat.

“For a breaking news event, like a riot scenario, you can provide a raw, unedited and probably more intimate window into what it is like on the ground than a TV network could never provide,” said Mr. Lewis, who is still covering the Baltimore story. “Partly that is because journalists holding smartphones are less conspicuous than those with satellite TV trucks. But I think there is also something about the immediacy and intimacy of a snapped conversation on a smartphone that brings a very different perspective.”...One of the ways to measure Periscope’s impact is whether it was being talked about on Twitter, which owns the service and lets users seamlessly share it. Data from Twitter analytics site Topsy shows that so far the most widely seen Periscopes were by celebrities like Ellen DeGeneres and Mariah Carey, though Baltimore’s unrest was among the most watched news events thus far.
Periscope  livestreaming  Baltimore  riots  bite-sized  mobile_applications  Freddie_Gray  immediacy  intimacy  smartphones  Vine  Instagram  Twitter  Facebook  Meerkat 
may 2015 by jerryking
IBM to Invest $3 Billion in Sensor-Data Unit - WSJ
March 31, 2015 | WSJ | By DON CLARK. Can CBC get good at communicating the final product on behalf of clients of Pelmorex. So CBC considers supplying the communications platform?

IBM plans to invest $3 billion over four years on a new business helping customers gather and analyze the flood of data from sensor-equipped devices and smartphones.... IBM announced that it is forming an alliance with the Weather Company, which owns the Weather Channel and other information providers. The two companies plan jointly to exploit data about weather conditions to help businesses make better decisions....the centerpiece of IBM's new business unit is a collection of online software called IoT Foundation that runs on IBM’s existing cloud services and allows customers and partners to create new applications and enhance existing ones with real-time data and analysis....IBM is betting that correlating dissimilar kinds of data will yield the highest value. “It’s essential to federate information from multiple sources,” said Bob Picciano, IBM’s senior VP of analytics.... the Weather Channel serves up 700,000 weather forecasts a second. It already sells data to a range of customers in agriculture, transportation and other industries that rely on weather.

But the opportunities have expanded, Mr. Kenny said, as weather sensors installed in many more places have contributed to more timely, localized forecasts. The added detail helps farmers predict more precisely, for example, where hail could impact their fields, Mr. Kenny said.

The Weather Company is turning to IBM, he said, because of its software expertise and relationships with customers in many industries.
sensors  IBM  weather  massive_data_sets  data  data_driven  analytics  Industrial_Internet  smartphones  cloud_computing 
march 2015 by jerryking
Maybe it’s time to rewire and unplug the next generation - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 30 2014 |Special to The Globe and Mail | GWYN MORGAN.

How can people who’ve spent almost every waking minute moment fixated on their gadgets learn thinking skills such as problem solving, strategic planning and disciplined time management? Psychological studies don’t paint an encouraging picture....It’s dangerous from a social standpoint because constantly distracted people who are incapable of long-form thinking will have difficulty managing their lives. And it’s dangerous economically because business success in a globally competitive world requires undivided focus, analytical accuracy, creative problem solving, innovative thinking and team-working skills.

The Internet brain seeks to fill all “gap” time tweeting, texting, e-mailing, following Facebook “friends” and, if there’s any spare minutes left, playing video games. Is it possible to rewire the Internet-addicted brain? I wouldn’t be surprised to see “Internet withdrawal” retreat centres emerge as a new business opportunity. And businesses should be adding “long-form thinking” to employee development programs. The survival of their enterprises may depend upon it.
millennials  smartphones  Gwyn_Morgan  slack_time  strategic_thinking  monotasking  long-term  digital_natives  timeouts 
december 2014 by jerryking
Comments to The Economics of Surveillance
4:54 pm September 29, 2012
Jassa Skott wrote:

Can you elaborate on how this works: “data that once seemed anonymous can actually identify people if it’s pooled with other...
anonymity  anonymization  letters_to_the_editor  massive_data_sets  mobile_applications  pooling  privacy  smartphones  synthetic_data 
january 2014 by jerryking
NBC Buying Web Service to Stream Phone Video - NYTimes.com
By BRIAN STELTER
Published: August 11, 2013

NBC News. The network is betting that the next generation involves live video, streamed straight to its control rooms in New York from the cellphones of witnesses.

On Monday, NBC News, a unit of Comcast’s NBCUniversal, will announce its acquisition of Stringwire, an early stage Web service that enables just that.
streaming  mobile_phones  smartphones  web_video  NBC  start_ups  Stringwire  early-stage 
august 2013 by jerryking
Why retailers love customers who shop on their smartphones - The Globe and Mail
Jul. 18 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY.
The study found that, unsurprisingly, even the most plugged-in consumers do not tend to click on digital ads. Of the smartphone owners surveyed, two-thirds said they “rarely” or “never” click on online advertisements, with the minority reporting that they do so regularly. It helps when an ad is personalized. In that case, 49 per cent said they would regularly click on ads. But even then, just over half still said they would rarely or never consider it. The greatest opportunity for marketers is arguably not in advertising to those digitally connected consumers; it is in offering them something they will find useful....“We are witnessing a seismic change in consumer behaviour due to the emergence of social and digital platforms and the significance and ubiquity of mobile as a consumer platform,” Mr. Schultz told analysts on a conference call in April to discuss the company’s earnings. The data Starbucks can now collect on those users are crucial for it as a marketer.

“Retail has historically been a rather anonymous transaction for many,” said Lori Bieda, executive lead for consumer intelligence at SAS Canada. “… Mobile makes a consumer known to retailers.”...The SAS research showed that people want their phones to act as “personal shoppers.” Those surveyed said they would be more likely to return to a store that sent them offers on their mobile devices – but that’s highly contingent on those offers being relevant and targeted to that person’s preferences.
bricks-and-mortar  consumer_behavior  customer_loyalty  Indigo  market_research  mobile_applications  mobile_phones  online_advertising  personal_shoppers  retailers  seismic_shifts  smartphones  Starbucks  Susan_Krashinsky 
july 2013 by jerryking
International: Mining the urban data
Nov 21st 2012 | The Economist | Ludwig Siegele: deputy international editor, The Economist from The World In 2013 print edition
cities  urban  data  smartphones  smart_cities  London  Singapore  sensors  mit  SENSEable  exhaust_data  optimization  real-time 
january 2013 by jerryking
Facebook taps Canada to test talk app - The Globe and Mail
STEVE LADURANTAYE, RITA TRICHUR

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jan. 03 2013

has chosen Canada to be the testing ground for an enhanced mobile app that allows users to make free calls from their smartphones.

As part of its testing, Facebook will allow Canadians to make phone calls to other Messenger users by using an enhanced version of that app on their iPhones. Since the calling feature will use voice over Internet protocol (VOIP) technology, it will affect subscribers’ wireless data plans rather than eat away at traditional voice minutes.

A second upgrade to the app will enable users to send short voice messages to other users on either Apple’s iOS operating system or on smartphones that use the Android platform.

Providing voice services to users is a burgeoning field for the world’s biggest tech companies, which are desperate to find ways to keep people using their services amid a host of competitors vying for attention. Google Inc. offers its users a service called Google Voice that allows anyone who uses the company’s e-mail service to make free calls in Canada and the United States from within a Gmail browser window. Microsoft Corp. spent $8.5-billion last year to buy the online phone service Skype, which allows users to call one another via their computers without incurring any charges.
Facebook  Skype  mobile_applications  smartphones  Google_Voice  VoIP  Steve_Ladurantaye 
january 2013 by jerryking
Apple-Google Team Up for $500 Million-Plus Kodak Patents Bid - Bloomberg
By Serena Saitto, Beth Jinks & Brian Womack - Dec 8, 2012

Apple Inc. (AAPL) and Google Inc. have joined forces to offer more than $500 million to buy Eastman Kodak Co. (EKDKQ)’s patents out of bankruptcy.

The two companies, competing for dominance of the smartphone market, have partnered after leading two separate groups this summer to buy some of Kodak’s 1,100 imaging patents.
Unlikely partnerships are typical in patent sales because they allow competitors to neutralize potential infringement litigation. A group including Apple, Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) and Research in Motion Ltd. bought Nortel Networks Corp.’s more than 6,000 patents for $4.5 billion out of bankruptcy last year. Google lost the auction for those patents after making an initial offer of $900 million.
Apple  auctions  bankruptcies  coalitions  collaboration  Google  Kodak  Nortel  patents  patent_infringement  partnerships  smartphones 
december 2012 by jerryking
With Smartphone Deals, Patents Become a New Asset Class - NYTimes.com
September 24, 2012, 1:21 pm4 Comments
With Smartphone Deals, Patents Become a New Asset Class
By STEVE LOHR

patents have become a new asset class.

Traditionally, patents sat on corporate shelves and were occasionally used as bargaining chips in cross-licensing deals with competitors. But that began to change in the 1990s, when technology companies like Texas Instruments and I.B.M. started to regard their patent portfolios as sources of revenue, licensing their intellectual property for fees.

Today, companies routinely buy and sell patents, mostly in deals that draw little attention, for millions of dollars instead of billions. The question, experts say, is how big the market will become.

“Patents are a tricky asset to trade,” said Josh Lerner, an economist at the Harvard Business School. “But there is clearly a huge amount of value in intellectual property. And I think what we’re seeing is the beginning of a lot more monetization and trading of intellectual property rights.”

A sizable specialist industry has developed to build the marketplace for trading ideas. The players include patent aggregators like Intellectual Ventures and RPX, patent brokers like Ocean Tomo and ICAP, hedge funds, investment banks and law firms.
property_rights  smartphones  patents  intellectual_property  law_firms  Steve_Lohr  valuations  Ocean_Tomo  markets  monetization  portfolio_management  cross-licensing  asset_classes 
september 2012 by jerryking
For Twitter Founder Jack Dorsey, It's Hip to Be Square Inc. - WSJ.com
September 19, 2012 | WSJ | By EMILY MALTBY.
For Twitter Founder Jack Dorsey, These Days It's Hip to Be Square Inc.

Jack Dorsey is hoping his latest start-up, Square Inc., can shake up the credit-card industry the same way another company he co-founded, Twitter Inc., has shaken up social media.

Square lets merchants process credit or debit cards using their smartphones or tablets. The service is used by about two million merchants, the company says, most of them small businesses such as boutique retail shops. It is also being rolled out at U.S. Starbucks Corp. stores.
Jack_Dorsey  Square  small_business  credit_cards  smartphones 
september 2012 by jerryking
How to Avoid a Smartphone's Bite - NYTimes.com
September 18, 2012, 4:38 pm1 Comment
How to Avoid a Smartphone’s Bite
By SETH KUGEL
roaming  mobile_phones  travel  smartphones 
september 2012 by jerryking
Mobile phones: Difference Engine: Copying the copier
Aug 6th 2012 | The Economist| by N.V.

The 73-year-old Judge Posner, who also teaches at Chicago Law School, is one of the founders of the legal school that interprets patent law in economic terms. His argument last June for refusing to ban Motorola’s products from the shelves, as Apple sought, was that “an injunction that imposes greater costs on the defendant than it confers benefits on the plaintiff reduces net social welfare”. That is the economic interpretation of patent law at work.

If, as it seems, Apple has had to resort to the courts to stifle competition and limit consumer choice, then it is a sad day for American innovation. That the company can do so with such impunity is an even sadder reflection of how dysfunctional the patent system in the United States has become.

The only reason why governments grant patents (and the monopoly rights they entail) is to promote innovation—in the hope of generating jobs and additional sources of revenue. Patents seek to do this by requiring the inventor to make prompt and full disclosure of the idea, so others may seek a licence to use it, or find ways to work around it. In exchange, the inventor is granted the right to exclude competitors for 20 years or so.

The cost to society of allowing a monopoly to flourish has long been assumed to be outweighed by the benefits that accrue from encouraging individuals to spend their own resources inventing useful things that did not exist before. In short, patents have been seen as a necessary evil for fostering innovation.

That assumption is now being challenged. Indeed, a debate has been raging in the United States over whether patents—especially those granted for protecting software ideas and business processes—help or hinder innovation.
patents  patent_law  Apple  Samsung  mobile_phones  smartphones  litigation  Richard_A._Posner  innovation  uChicago 
august 2012 by jerryking
Code for America, a Peace Corps for Civic-Minded Geeks | Marvels - WSJ.com
August 24, 2012 | WSJ| By HOLLY FINN.

A Peace Corps for Civic-Minded Geeks
How young techies are saving cities time, money—even lives



CfA fellows have designed more than 35 apps, for everything from urban blight to school buses. In New Orleans, they coded a system to more accurately sort the backlog of properties for demolition. In Santa Cruz, Calif., they're streamlining the application process to open a business. The group runs an Accelerator for civic start-ups. Its work presses governments to make information more visible (530 data sets liberated) and helps communities to mobilize (write-a-thons with 2,500 people). Textizen, a citizen feedback app built this year, has already been repurposed in three cities.

Government spending on information technology in 2012 is set at $79.5 billion federally and $55.4 billion for state and local. Meanwhile, to complete one government project—estimated at two years and $2 million—it took a couple of CfA fellows just 2½ months.
CfA  government_2.0  gov_2.0  cities  geeks  coding  mobile_applications  smartphones  software_developers 
august 2012 by jerryking
Apple Gets Decisive Win in Patent Case - WSJ.com
August 24, 2012 | WSJ | By JESSICA E. VASCELLARO.

Apple, which cited more than 28 Samsung products, sued Samsung last year and accused the South Korean company of infringing seven patents. Samsung fired back, alleging that some iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch models infringed up to five patents....Apple has won big...being awarded $1.05 billion in damages and providing ammunition for more legal attacks on mobile-device rivals.

Jurors Friday found that Samsung infringed all but one of the seven patents at issue in the case—a patent covering the physical design of the iPad. They found all seven of Apple's patents valid—despite Samsung's attempts to have them thrown out. They also decided Apple didn't violate any of the five patents Samsung asserted against it.

The damage award is shy of Apple's request for more than $2.5 billion, but much larger than Samsung's estimates and still ranking among the largest intellectual-property awards on record.
litigation  Apple  Samsung  patent_law  patents  smartphones  intellectual_property 
august 2012 by jerryking
Taking One for the Country - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: June 30, 2012

"I found myself applauding for Chief Justice Roberts the same way I did for Al Gore when he gracefully bowed to the will of the Supreme Court in the 2000 election and the same way I do for those wounded warriors — and for the same reason: They each, in their own way, took one for the country.

To put it another way, Roberts undertook an act of statesmanship for the national good by being willing to anger his own “constituency” on a very big question. But he also did what judges should do: leave the big political questions to the politicians. The equivalent act of statesmanship on the part of our politicians now would be doing what Roberts deferred to them as their responsibility: decide the big, hard questions, with compromises, for the national good. Otherwise, we’re doomed to a tug of war on the deck of the Titanic, no matter what health care plan we have. "...Our newfound natural gas bounty can give us long-term access to cheap, cleaner energy and, combined with advances in robotics and software, is already bringing blue-collar manufacturing back to America. Web-enabled cellphones and tablets are creating vast new possibilities to bring high-quality, low-cost education to every community college and public school so people can afford to acquire the skills to learn 21st-century jobs. Cloud computing is giving anyone with a creative spark cheap, powerful tools to start a company with very little money. And dramatically low interest rates mean we can borrow to build new infrastructure — and make money.
Tom_Friedman  John_Roberts  U.S._Supreme_Court  judges  statesmanship  hydraulic_fracturing  natural_gas  cloud_computing  smartphones  robotics  software  interest_rates  infrastructure  automation  constituencies  low-interest  compromise  blue-collar  manufacturers  politicians  hard_questions  high-quality 
july 2012 by jerryking
Retailers Reach Out With Smartphone Apps - WSJ.com
April 21, 2010 | WSJ | By GEOFFREY A. FOWLER.
Retailers Reach Out on Cellphones
Software Apps Provide Shoppers With Rewards to Help Lure Them Into Stores
smartphones  mobile_applications  retailers  FourSquare  Loopt  Shopkick  Kraft  P&G 
june 2012 by jerryking
Consumer banking: Counter revolution
May 19th 2012 | | The Economist | Anonymous

the growth of internet usage on smartphones, the rise of “big data” computer processing and the increasing willingness of customers to do complicated things online. These developments have long promised to transform the way banks do business and organise themselves....If this was just a more convenient way of paying, the banks would probably shrug. But it also promises to overturn your existing financial relationships. Instead of reaching for the first card that happens to be in your wallet to pay for a $2 cup of coffee (and risk being charged a $35 penalty by your bank for exceeding your overdraft limit), your phone will choose the best method of payment.
banking  disruption  massive_data_sets  Google  judgment  Paypal  Square  smartphones  data_mining  immigrants  migrants  remittances  mobile_phones 
may 2012 by jerryking
SMART PHONES: The farmer's new best friend
SMART PHONES: The farmer's new best friend
February 2011 | Better Farming | by BERNARD TOBIN.

Estimates are that upwards of a quarter of Ontario’s farmers are using these devices – and finding that they are making information sharing and decision-making a great deal more efficient
smartphones  farming  agriculture 
march 2012 by jerryking
The Coming Revolution in Mobile Job Hunting - Finance and Accounting Jobs News and Advice
Mar 07 2012
The Coming Revolution in Mobile Job Hunting
By Joseph Walker

Recent graduates and college and graduate students surveyed are either using their smartphones for career-related purposes or could imagine themselves doing so....Yet just a quarter of the 117 American companies surveyed had either a mobile application or mobile-enabled website....AT&T, in 2009 optimized portions of its careers site for mobile users. It uses "sniffer" technology to detect what device someone is using and then directs them to a page designed for that particular smartphone. In the coming months, it will release a new version of its mobile site that will make even more content from its desktop site available to mobile users, said Jennifer Terry, director of staffing strategic initiatives.
job_search  mobile_phones  smartphones  Colleges_&_Universities  new_graduates  Managing_Your_Career  mobile_applications 
march 2012 by jerryking
Five tips for moving to mobile - The Globe and Mail
ivor tossell
Special to Globe and Mail Update
Published Monday, Feb. 13, 2012
m-commerce  howto  mobile  mobile_phones  smartphones 
february 2012 by jerryking
Mark Mills and Julio Ottino: The Coming Tech-led Boom - WSJ.com
JANUARY 30, 2012

The Coming Tech-led Boom
Three breakthroughs are poised to transform this century as much as telephony and electricity did the last....

By MARK P. MILLS AND JULIO M. OTTINO

In January 2012, we sit again on the cusp of three grand technological transformations with the potential to rival that of the past century. All find their epicenters in America: big data, smart manufacturing and the wireless revolution.
massive_data_sets  manufacturers  3-D  wireless  breakthroughs  epicenters  smartphones  mobile_applications  demographic_changes  Colleges_&_Universities 
february 2012 by jerryking
Shuttered: Digital cameras killed Kodak, but smartphones will kill digital cameras | Features | FP Tech Desk | Financial Post
Jan 19, 2012 – Jan 20, 2012 2:25 PM ET

Eastman Kodak, which invented the hand-held camera and helped bring the world the first pictures from the moon, has filed for bankruptcy protection, capping a prolonged plunge for one of the United States' best-known companies.

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By Matt Hartley and Jameson Berkow
creative_destruction  Apple  iPhone  Blockbuster  cameras  Canon  Kodak  HTC  Netflix  Nikon  Nokia  photography  smartphones  digital_cameras 
january 2012 by jerryking
Design Sets Tone at Square, a Mobile Payments Start-Up - NYTimes.com
By NICK BILTON
| January 15, 2012,

“We believe strongly that the company is going to be reflected in the product and vice-versa,” Mr. Dorsey said. “The internal matches the external and the external matches the internal, and if we can’t provide a clean, simple, well-designed experience in here, it’s not going to be reflected in our identity. It’s in our DNA.” (Mr. Dorsey also is the chairman and co-founder of Twitter, where his obsession with openness is not as extreme.)

Square also borrows metaphors from traditional institutions, including the old United States Mint building, which sits across the street from the company’s office. “It looks like something that is built to last; it looks like it will stay up forever,” he said. “So how do you build that into pixels instead of stone?”

For centuries banks were built with thick stone walls, marble slab floors and heavy metal doors, all of which gave customers the feeling that bankers were dependable and trustworthy.

Square transactions primarily occur on a small plastic plug, inserted into a smartphone’s headphone jack, through which people swipe credit cards.

A hefty chunk of marble it is not. Square’s front door to customers is a smartphone application. Square has to provide the simplest experience possible, Mr. Dorsey believes, because, along with good design, it will evoke trust and confidence in a new financial institution that lives in a smartphone.
Square  Jack_Dorsey  start_ups  mobile_payments  metaphors  design  smartphones  mobile_applications  UX  customer_experience  trustworthiness  confidence 
january 2012 by jerryking
The Really Smart Phone - WSJ.com
APRIL 23, 2011 | WSJ | By ROBERT LEE HOTZ.

The Really Smart Phone
Researchers are harvesting a wealth of intimate detail from our cellphone data, uncovering the hidden patterns of our social lives, travels, risk of disease—even our political views.

"We have turned society into a laboratory where behavior can be objectively followed."
mobile  privacy  research  statistics  technology  patterns  data  smartphones  mobile_phones  MIT  online_behaviour  behavioural_targeting 
october 2011 by jerryking
iPhone 4S unleashes more creative destruction | Considered View | Breakingviews
04 October 2011 | By Robert Cyran.

Apple has an astonishing ability to casually unleash creative destruction. Its latest iPhone, the 4S, offers faster data-processing and downloads, as well as voice-powered software. This may not have lived up to the most feverish expectations of investors: Apple shares fell while the market rallied. But it will do more than enough to create headaches for companies ranging from Research In Motion to American Greetings.

Smartphones started by devouring the personal digital assistant, as any former Palm Pilot aficionado can testify. They terrorized the market for fixed-line phones, which are now in sharp decline. Apple’s newest gadget shows just how hungry smartphone makers, and Apple in particular, are to eat rivals’ lunches.

The new iPhone’s camera offers sharply better video. That will further hurt sales of digital still and video cameras. Its software allows easy and free texting to other Apple devices. That’s bad news for telephone operators, who make fat margins on such services. Instant messaging has also been the killer app for BlackBerry users.
Apple  iPhone  creative_destruction  smartphones  wireline  margins  staying_hungry  RIM  BlackBerry  blindsided  voice_assistants  voice_interfaces  text_messages  free  investors'_expectations  bad_news 
october 2011 by jerryking
Silicon Valley Reborn as Smartphone Valley - CNBC
4 Oct 2011 | Financial Times| By: Chris Nuttall.

Apple’s unveiling of the iPhone 5 on Tuesday at its Cupertino HQis just the latest sign that Silicon Valley is taking on a fresh mantle of Smartphone Valley, with its growing reputation making it a magnet for mobile operators around the world.

AT&T, Verizon and Vodafone have all just opened research, testing and incubation centres in San Francisco and the Valley only weeks apart. weeks apart....The app culture that both have engendered means there is a race on among operators to feature the newest trends and advances in software first, amid fierce competition for the attention of Silicon Valley developers.

Vodafone’s lab allows developers to incubate their ideas and test how apps and services would perform on the worldwide networks it replicates at its facility.

“We want to bring to market these ideas and accelerate the process – the hope is that six to nine months after we prove something here, it can be in the hands of a user in one of our operating countries,”
Chris_Nuttall  Silicon_Valley  smartphones  Apple  Android  mobile_applications  iPhone  software_developers  wireless_networks  Verizon  Vodafone  incubators  accelerators 
october 2011 by jerryking
The phone that works like a bank - The Globe and Mail
PREET BANERJEE | Columnist profile | E-mail
Globe and Mail Update
Published Tuesday, Sep. 27, 2011 10:26AM EDT
Last updated Wednesday, Sep. 28, 2011
mobile_applications  smartphones  mobile_phones  banking 
september 2011 by jerryking
Make Your Smartphone Smarter - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 24, 2011 | WSJ | By SEAN CAPTAIN. Make Your
Smartphone Smarter
The tools you use the most on your iPhone, iPad or Android don't have to
be one-size-fits-all. With the right apps, you can customize your
device to fit like a handmade glove
mobile_applications  smartphones  one-size-fits-all 
september 2011 by jerryking
How GE gets information into staffers’ smartphones | Articles
When GE wanted to inform people about its business in health
care management, it could have trotted out a new Web page and e-mailed
announcements to staff, inviting itchy-fingered employees to hit the
delete button. Instead, it created a game for smartphones, targeting
both employees and the general public.
GE  smartphones  games 
september 2011 by jerryking
Technology Devices Either Sell Big or Die Fast - NYTimes.com
August 23, 2011 | NYT | By JENNA WORTHAM & VERNE G.
KOPYTOFF. In recent years, technology companies have been cutting their
losses with increasing speed...These days, big technology companies —
particularly those in the hypercompetitive smartphone and tablet
industries — are starting to resemble Hollywood film studios. Every
release needs to be a blockbuster, and the only measure of success is
the opening-weekend gross. There is little to no room for the sleeper
indie hit that builds good word of mouth to become a solid performer
over time. ...this accelerated lifecycle of high-end hardware is being
described as “Darwinian.” ...Companies kill new products more quickly
now because of the higher cost of staying competitive, ..The crush of
tech bloggers and Twitter-using early adopters .. raises the stakes
around how well new products perform in the marketplace...One needs
everything in place: the content, the applications and the
experience--to have a reasonable chance at success. [JCK: "everything in place" = ecosystems]
accelerated_lifecycles  attrition_rates  blockbusters  content  culling  Darwinian  ecosystems  hits  Jenna_Wortham  kill_rates  mobile_applications  new_products  product_development  product_launches  social_media  smartphones  speed  tablets  UX  winner-take-all 
august 2011 by jerryking
5 smart phones for students on the go - The Globe and Mail
CHAD SAPIEHA
Globe and Mail Update
Published Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011
smartphones  students 
august 2011 by jerryking
How Smartphones and Handheld Computers Are Bringing on an Educational Revolution
April 1, 2010 | Fast Company | By: Anya Kamenetz

The U.S. Department of Education has earmarked $5 billion in competitive
school-reform grants to scale up pilot programs and evaluate best
practices of all kinds. Major foundations are specifically zeroing in on
handhelds for preschool and the primary grades. "Young kids and
multisensor-touch computing are a huge area of innovation," says Phoenix
Wang, the head of a startup philanthropic venture fund called Startl --
funded by the Gates, MacArthur, and Hewlett foundations -- that's
entirely focused on educational investing. For Pat Condon
education  mobile_phones  mobile_applications  pilot_programs  smartphones  revolution  teaching  learning  Anya_Kamenetz 
july 2011 by jerryking
Mobile telecoms in Africa: Digital revolution | The Economist
Apr 7th 2011 | DAR ES SALAAM

Whether on mobile phones or tablets, being online is rapidly becoming
the norm in Africa. That will boost the continent’s information and
entertainment business and allow African media houses such as the Nation
Media Group (in the east) and Media24 (in the south) to expand their
businesses around digital content tailored to local languages and
markets. Western content-makers will no doubt worry about the increased
risk of piracy, but if they get their offerings right Africa will be a
huge new market for their wares too.
mobile_phones  smartphones  tablets  Africa  Nokia  Huawei  mobile  digital_revolution 
july 2011 by jerryking
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