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jerryking : snooping   5

Big Investors Don’t Want Wall Street Analysts Snooping on Them - WSJ
June 14, 2018 | WSJ | By Telis Demos

the research shops are finding ways to make up the lost revenue, turning to readership data. They do say that information is power, and in this case I guess the banks have the power again.
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I think the WSJ is conflating two very different issues. The privacy concerns apply on ethical (possibly criminal) grounds rather than moral ones, in the example given of hedge funds asking a broker to provide aggregated readership data. It's very hard to imagine a responsible research provider doing this. The other piece - the tracking of utilization of research product is exactly what brokers need to do to ensure they are being paid appropriately for the level of service a client is receiving. MiFID 2 has and will continue to put pressure on how much research clients consume, and to precisely account for how much they pay for it. Transparency is a two-way street. A 90-day embargo on the readership data is a simple solution, as quarterly/bi-annual reviews should suffice to true-up the bank/client ledger.

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behavioural_data  investment_research  institutional_investors  reading  research_analysts  snooping  traders  Wall_Street  buy_side  informational_advantages  privacy  transparency 
june 2018 by jerryking
Traders Seek an Edge With High-Tech Snooping - WSJ.com
Dec. 18, 2013 | WSJ | By Michael Rothfeld and Scott Patterson.

A growing industry uses surveillance and data-crunching technology to supply traders with nonpublic information.

Genscape's clients include banks such as Goldman Sachs Group Inc., J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. and Deutsche Bank AG, hedge funds including Citadel LLC and large energy-trading outfits such as Trafigura Beheer BV. Surveillance and analysis of the oil, electricity and natural-gas sectors can run Genscape clients more than $300,000 a year.
surveillance  data_driven  slight_edge  traders  hedge_funds  sleuthing  Genscape  sensors  commodities  corporate_espionage  competitive_intelligence  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  market_research  exclusivity  investment_research  research_methods  LBMA  nonpublic  primary_field_research  banks  Citadel  oil_industry  natural_gas  snooping  alternative_data  informational_advantages  imagery  satellites  infrared  electric_power 
december 2013 by jerryking
Brazil’s outrage may fade, but debate over spy network is just beginning
Oct. 09 2013 | The Globe and Mail |CAMPBELL CLARK.

There are important public-interest questions for which we don’t have real answers. Has the government of Canada directed intelligence agencies to make economic espionage in foreign countries one of their priorities? Is this kind of metadata spying, and new revelations about the extent of it, really raising angst among our friends and semi-friends such as Brazil or India or South Africa?... whether the Canadian government has mandated intelligence agencies to make supporting the economy and trade a priority. University of Ottawa intelligence expert Wesley Wark thinks the Brazil snooping was more likely a task the U.S. gave to a Five Eyes partner, but Canadians should know if there’s a mandate for economic spying – which is risky, perhaps not worth it and, if intelligence is provided to companies, littered with potential abuses.
espionage  Five_Eyes  CSE  security_&_intelligence  Brazil  Canada  Wesley_Wark  snooping  GoC 
november 2013 by jerryking
Snap Out of It: Kids Aren't Reliable Tech Predictors - WSJ.com
Nov. 17, 2013 | WSJ | By Farhad Manjoo.

First, Snapchat's main selling point is ephemerality. Users who send a photo and caption using the app can select how long the image is viewable. Second, and relatedly, Snapchat is used primarily by teens and people in college. This explains much of Silicon Valley's obsession with the company....tech execs, youngsters are the canaries in the gold mine.

That logic follows a widely shared cultural belief: We all tend to assume that young people are on the technological vanguard, that they somehow have got an inside scoop on what's next. If today's kids are Snapchatting instead of Facebooking, the thinking goes, tomorrow we'll all be Snapchatting, too, because tech habits, like hairstyles, flow only one way: young to old.

There is only one problem with elevating young people's tastes this way: Kids are often wrong....Incidentally, though 20-something tech founders like Mr. Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates get a lot of ink, they are unusual.... "The twentysomething inexperienced founder is an outlier, not the norm," ...If you think about it for a second, the fact that young people aren't especially reliable predictors of tech trends shouldn't come as a surprise. Sure, youth is associated with cultural flexibility, a willingness to try new things that isn't necessarily present in older folk. But there are other, less salutary hallmarks of youth, including capriciousness, immaturity, and a deference to peer pressure even at the cost of common sense. This is why high school is such fertile ground for fads. And it's why, in other cultural areas, we don't put much stock in teens' choices. No one who's older than 18, for instance, believes One Direction is the future of music....Is the app just a youthful fad, just another boy band, or is it something more permanent; is it the Beatles?

To figure this out, we would need to know why kids are using it. Are they reaching for Snapchat for reasons that would resonate with older people—because, like the rest of us, they've grown wary of the public-sharing culture promoted by Facebook and Twitter? Or are they using it for less universal reasons, because they want to evade parental snooping, send risqué photos, or avoid feeling left out of a fad everyone else has adopted?

At this point no one knows, probably not even the people who make Snapchat. For now,That's reason enough to be wary of Snapchat's youthful vigor.
capriciousness  customer_risk  developmental_change  ephemerality  fads  Farhad_Manjoo  generational_change  hiring-a-product-to-do-a-specific-job  immaturity  impermanence  invisibility  leading_indicators  motivations  peer_pressure  predictors  Silicon_Valley  Snapchat  snooping  transient  trends  young_people  youth 
november 2013 by jerryking
Snooping in the Age of E-book - This Life - NYTimes.com
September 23, 2011 |NYT| By BRUCE FEILER. How does one snoop
bookshelves in the age of e-book?...a bit of gumshoe in someone’s
cupboard or closet can reveal far more about them than an entire
evening’s worth of chitchat. “Places reflect long series of behavior,”
“If I have a conversation with you, I just get snippets of behavior.
Your books, your chairs, your wall hangings represent an accumulation
over many yrs. A space distills repeated acts. That’s why it’s hard to
fake.” …A perfect storm of clues is what makes bookshelf sleuthing so
appealing — and so difficult to replicate elsewhere in a home. “The
kitchen & pantry are pretty good,” …“But they don’t interest me as
much as a person’s bookshelf,” because the kitchen and pantry are
reflection of how the person eats, whereas the bookcase is reflection of
how he thinks.”… For all the benefits of snooping, the activity does
present certain ethical quandaries. Is it O.K. to look in someone’s
closet? Their medicine cabinet? Their iPad?
sleuthing  books  personal_libraries  e-books  artifacts  physical_place  primary_field_research  snooping 
september 2011 by jerryking

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