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Opinion: Canadian companies must prepare for disruptors to come knocking
July 26, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by JOHN RUFFOLO.

In August, 2011, technology legend Marc Andreessen wrote his seminal article titled Why Software Is Eating the World, which became the central investment thesis behind his venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. Andreessen’s prognostication has since followed Amara’s Law on the effect of technology, which aptly states: “We tend to overestimate the effect of a technology in the short run and underestimate the effect in the long run.” The feast has really just begun.

We are in the midst of the Fourth Industrial Revolution – or as some call it, the Information Revolution.....the Information Revolution really began to take shape in 2008, catalyzed by three incredibly powerful and converging forces – mobility-first, cloud computing and social media. All three forces collided together with full impact in 2008, spawning a wave of new technology companies.......The next phase of the Fourth Industrial Revolution will see the rise of a new species of company – the “disruptors.” While technology companies will continue to grow, we are witnessing the enablement of those technologies across all economic sectors as the leading weapon used by new entrants to disrupt the traditional incumbents in their respective industries. The massive influx of venture capital to support the building and growth of technology companies over the past 10 years has produced these tools, such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, and the internet of things, which are now being leveraged across all industries......Those companies that can harness these new technologies to operate better and faster, and to gain unmatched insights into their customers, will prosper. Although these disruptors are not technology companies in the conventional sense, their tight focus on value creation through innovation further blurs the lines between a technology company and a traditional company.

The incumbents, however, are not asleep at the wheel. To ward off the disruptors, they know they must embrace technology. It is this battleground that I believe will generate the greatest wealth creation and transfer opportunities over the next decade. The disruptors, naturally, are particularly active in those industries where they perceive the incumbents to be burdened by outdated technological infrastructure or business models, and hard-pressed to counterattack.

Yesterday, the disruptors focused primarily on consumer sectors such as the music industry, travel booking, newspapers, magazines and book publishing. Today, it’s groceries, entertainment and personal transportation, thanks to Amazon, Netflix and Uber, respectively.

But consumer-focused sectors were just the start for the disruptors. Before long, I believe we will see them try to disrupt varied industries such as banking, insurance, health care, real estate and even agriculture and mining; no industry will be immune. These sectors all represent emblematic Canadian brands, and yes, each will in turn will go through the same jarring disruption as so many others.
************************************************
See [Why It’s Not Enough Just to Be Disruptive - The New York Times
By JEREMY G. PHILIPS AUG. 10, 2016] Creating enormous value over the long term requires turning a tactical edge into some form of durable advantage....Superior tactical execution can still create real value, particularly where it provides ammunition for a bigger war (like Walmart’s battle with Amazon). And in the long term, value is created not by disruption, but by weaving together advantages (as both Amazon and Walmart have done in different ways) that together create a barrier that is hard to storm.
Amara's_Law  artificial_intelligence  cloud_computing  digital_savvy  disruption  incumbents  investment_thesis  John_Ruffolo  legacy_tech  Marc_Andreessen  mobility_first  overestimation  social_media  software_is_eating_the_world  start_ups  technology  underestimation  venture_capital 
7 weeks ago by jerryking
The Ad Industry Has High Hopes for Direct-to-Consumer Businesses
June 17, 2019 | WSJ | By Nat Ives.

Advertising has turned its attention to what it hopes will be the next new engine of growth for the industry: direct-to-consumer marketers.

Direct-to-consumer businesses, which offer everything from mattresses to toothbrushes to home workouts, start by cutting out middlemen such as physical retail distributors. And they relentlessly focus on measures such as the cost to acquire a new customer—while relying on advertising, usually on social media, as the main way to grow.......ad executives hope that the booming DTC business can become a major new revenue source for the industry.....DTC brands play in an apparently unlimited range of products and could have rapid expansion ahead.

A varied field
Measures of DTC activity vary, but all indicate rapid growth. For a picture of U.S. ad spending by DTC companies, Magna tracks a basket of 13 companies that it considers disrupters, including footwear seller Allbirds Inc. and bedding marketer Casper Sleep Inc. Their spending increased 35% last year to $378 million, and is likely to grow another 30% this year and 25% next year.

And they’re spreading out from their usual advertising havens such as social media. The 13 brands’ national TV spending soared 42% in 2018 to $137 million, for instance, and is expected to rise 34% this year and 25% in 2020, Magna says........For some DTC brands, diversification is partly about protection.....Bombas LLC decided to move a big chunk of its marketing budget away from Facebook .....fearing its strategy could be hurt if the social network unexpectedly changed an algorithm or shifted a policy......Diversification is also a matter of taking growth to another level. DTC brands are “reaching the scale where they want to talk to the mass market, to consumers everywhere in the country, not just the trendsetters,” ......After a certain point for a DTC brand, increasing spending in the same place begins to produce diminishing returns, says Heidi Zak, co-founder and co-chief executive at DTC bra company ThirdLove Inc. The company says it has sold more than four million bras since it started taking orders in 2014, and has had annualized revenue growth of 180% over the past four years. It declines to disclose its sales figures or ad budget.

“Today, when people ask me where we are, I say pretty much everywhere,” Ms. Zak says, rattling off advertising channels including Facebook, Pinterest , search, podcasts, radio, direct mail, print and TV. The company ran its first national branding campaign last fall to advance a theme of “To Each, Her Own”—with a longer-term goal rather than immediate sales.
advertising  advertising_agencies  booming  brands  customer_acqusition  direct-to-consumer  diversification  out-of-home  self-protection  social_media  store_openings 
june 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | The Man Who Changed the World, Twice - The New York Times
May 8, 2018 | NYT | by David Brooks.
This column is about a man, Stewart Brand, who changed the world, at least twice. I want to focus less on the impact of his work, which is all around us, and more on how he did it, because he’s a model of how you do social change.....In 1965, Brand created a multimedia presentation called “America Needs Indians,” which he performed at the LSD-laced, proto-hippie gatherings he helped organize in California.

Brand then had two epiphanies. First, there were no public photos of the entire earth. Second, if people like him were going to return to the land and lead natural lives, they would need tools......launched the the “Whole Earth Catalog.”....the Catalog....was also a bible for what would come to be known as the counterculture, full of reading lists and rich with the ideas of Buckminster Fuller and others........When a culture changes, it’s often because a small group of people on society’s margins find a better way to live, parts of which the mainstream adopts. Brand found a magic circle in the Bay Area counterculture. He celebrated it, publicized it, gave it a coherence it otherwise lacked and encouraged millions to join.....The communes fizzled. But on the other side of the Bay Area, Brand sensed another cultural wave building-- computers!! Brand and others imagined computers launching a consciousness revolution — personal tools to build neural communities that would blow the minds of mainstream America. [See Fred Turner says in “From Counterculture to Cyberculture,” ].......Brand played cultural craftsman once again, as a celebrity journalist. In 1972 he wrote a piece for Rolling Stone announcing the emergence of a new outlaw hacker culture..... Brand is a talented community architect. In the 1970s, he was meshing Menlo Park computer geeks with cool hippie types. The tech people were entranced by “Whole Earth,” including Steve Jobs....In 1985, Brand and Larry Brilliant helped create the Well, an early online platform (like Usenet) where techies could meet and share. .......Brand’s gift, Frank Foer writes in “World Without Mind,” is “to channel the spiritual longings of his generation and then to explain how they could be fulfilled through technology.” Innovations don’t just proceed by science alone; as Foer continues, “the culture prods them into existence.”....... Brooks argues that the computer has failed as a source of true community. Social media seems to immiserate people as much as it bonds them. And so there’s a need for future Brands, young cultural craftsmen who identify those who are building the future, synthesizing their work into a common ethos and bringing them together in a way that satisfies the eternal desire for community and wholeness.

===========================================
Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
David_Brooks  Stewart_Brand  community_builders  product_launches  counterculture  community_organizing  Silicon_Valley  '70s  trailblazers  social_change  role_models  via:marshallk  hackers  social_media  Steve_Jobs  books 
may 2018 by jerryking
The 60-second interview: Adi Ignatius, editor in chief, Harvard Business Review- POLITICO Media
By CAPITAL STAFF 04/28/2015

H.B.R. represented an amazing challenge. Here was a 90-year-old publication that had always done well but that needed reinvention. And so we reimagined everything—the magazine, the website, the book division. Our goal was to find ways to connect with new fans, while maintaining the same high standards. By any yardstick, it worked! Our circulation, at 300,000, is the highest it’s ever been, and our newsstand sales soared. Our readers are deeply engaged, and I interact with them all the time......CAPITAL: Harvard Business Review stories do particularly well in terms of social shares on LinkedIn. What do you make of LinkedIn's ambitions to become a media company, with in-house editors looking over user-generated articles? How those ambitions impact your publication?

IGNATIUS: Yes, H.B.R. content does well across the major social channels, including LinkedIn. We respect LinkedIn and have watched it evolve more and more into a content player. But we’re excited about what we’re doing at H.B.R. and fully expect to remain a valued destination for people in business who love ideas. We’re in the process of reinvention again, redefining what it means to be a subscriber, to be part of the H.B.R. experience. It’s exciting, and we look forward to unveiling it before too long.
HBR  social_media  reinvention  reimagining  magazines  newsstand_circulation  LinkedIn 
april 2018 by jerryking
Why Crate and Barrel’s CEO Isn’t Worried About Amazon WSJ
March 20, 2018 | WSJ | By Khadeeja Safdar.

Furniture has been late to shift online, but it is now one of the fastest-growing segments of e-commerce. Competition from online players such as Wayfair Inc. and big-box stores like Walmart Inc. and Target Corp. has put pressure on furniture chains. Amazon.com Inc. has been making a major push into the home-furnishings business, too.
retailers  furniture  Amazon  social_media  decluttering 
march 2018 by jerryking
Algos know more about us than we do about ourselves
NOVEMBER 24, 2017 | Financial Time | John Dizard.

When intelligence collectors and analysts take an interest in you, they usually start not by monitoring the content of your calls or messages, but by looking at the patterns of your communications. Who are you calling, how often and in what sequence? What topics do you comment on in social media?

This is called traffic analysis, and it can give a pretty good notion of what you and the people you know are thinking and what you are preparing to do. Traffic analysis started as a military intelligence methodology, and became systematic around the first world war. Without even knowing the content of encrypted messages, traffic analysts could map out an enemy “order of battle” or disposition of forces, and make inferences about commanders’ intentions.

Traffic analysis techniques can also cut through the petabytes of redundant babble and chatter in the financial and political worlds. Even with state secrecy and the forests of non-disclosure agreements around “proprietary” investment or trading algorithms, crowds can be remarkably revealing in their open-source posts on social media.

Predata, a three-year-old New York and Washington-based predictive data analytics provider, has a Princeton-intensive crew of engineers and international affairs graduates working on early “signals” of market and political events. Predata trawls the open metadata for users of Twitter, Wikipedia, YouTube, Reddit and other social media, and analyses it to find indicators of future price moves or official actions.

I have been following their signals for a while and find them to be useful indicators. Predata started by creating political risk indicators, such as Iran-Saudi antagonism, Italian or Chilean labour unrest, or the relative enthusiasm for French political parties. Since the beginning of this year, they have been developing signals for financial and commodities markets.

The 1-9-90 rule
1 per cent of internet users initiate discussions or content, 9 per cent transmit content or participate occasionally and 90 per cent are consumers or ‘lurkers’

Using the example of the company’s BoJ signal. For this, Predata collects the metadata from 300 sources, such as Twitter users, contested Wikipedia edits or YouTube items created by Japanese monetary policy geeks. Of those, at any time perhaps 100 are important, and 8 to 10 turn out to be predictive....This is where you need some domain knowledge [domain expertise = industry expertise]. It turns out that Twitter is pretty important for monetary policy, along with the Japanese-language Wiki page for the Bank of Japan, or, say, a YouTube video of [BoJ governor] Haruhiko Kuroda’s cross-examination before a Diet parliamentary committee.

“Then you build a network of candidate discussions [JK: training beds] and look for the pattern those took before historical moves. The machine-learning algorithm goes back and picks the leads and lags between traffic and monetary policy events.” [Jk: Large data sets with known correct answers serve as a training bed and then new data serves as a test bed]

Typically, Predata’s algos seem to be able to signal changes in policy or big price moves [jk: inflection points] somewhere between 2 days and 2 weeks in advance. Unlike some academic Twitter scholars, Predata does not do systematic sentiment analysis of tweets or Wikipedia edits. “We only look for how many people there are in the conversation and comments, and how many people disagreed with each other. We call the latter the coefficient of contestation,” Mr Shinn says.

The lead time for Twitter, Wiki or other social media signals varies from one market to another. Foreign exchange markets typically move within days, bond yields within a few days to a week, and commodities prices within a week to two weeks. “If nothing happens within 30 days,” says Mr Lee, “then we say we are wrong.”
algorithms  alternative_data  Bank_of_Japan  commodities  economics  economic_data  financial_markets  industry_expertise  inflection_points  intelligence_analysts  lead_time  machine_learning  massive_data_sets  metadata  non-traditional  Predata  predictive_analytics  political_risk  signals  social_media  spycraft  traffic_analysis  training_beds  Twitter  unconventional 
november 2017 by jerryking
J.Crew’s Mickey Drexler Confesses: I Underestimated How Tech Would Upend Retail
By Khadeeja Safdar
Updated May 24, 2017

For decades, fashion was essentially a hit or miss business. Merchants like Mr. Drexler would make bets on what people would be wearing a year in advance, since that’s how long it took to design and produce items. Hits guaranteed handsome returns until the next season.

Now, competitors with high-tech, data-driven supply chains can copy styles faster and move them into stores in a matter of weeks. Online marketplaces drive down prices, and design details such as nicer buttons and richer colors are less apparent on the internet. Social media adds fuel to the style churn—consumers want a new outfit for every Instagram post. “The rules of the game have changed,” said Janet Kloppenburg, president of JJK Research, a retail-focused research firm. “It’s not just about product anymore. It’s also about speed and pricing.”

Mr. Drexler’s plan is to emphasize lower prices, pivot toward more digital marketing and adopt a more accessible image........Mr. Drexler didn’t appreciate how the quality of garments could easily get lost in a sea of options online, where prices drive decisions, or how social media would give rise to disposable fashion. Online, price has more impact than the sensory qualities of clothing. “You go into a store—I love this, I love this, I love this,” he said. “You go online and you just don’t get the same sense and feel of the goods because you’re looking at a picture.”.....Amazon.com and other algorithm-based websites can change prices by the hour based on demand, and the variety of options makes it easy to mix and match brands.

“The days of people wearing head-to-toe J.Crew are over,”......Today, with nearly two billion people using Facebook every month, he feels differently: “You cannot be successful without being obsessed with the product, obsessed with social media, and obsessed with digital,” he said. “Retail is now about all that.”

Mr. Drexler said he hasn’t given up on quality. Instead, he is now lowering prices on about 300 items and creating an analytics team dedicated to optimizing prices for each garment......TPG co-founder David Bonderman recently acknowledged J.Crew and its peers are struggling with declining mall traffic and the shift to online shopping. “The internet has proven much more resilient and much more important than most of us thought a decade ago,” he said at a conference earlier this month.
retailers  e-commerce  Mickey_Drexler  J.Crew  fashion  apparel  LBOs  private_equity  hits  copycats  social_media  Instagram  data_driven  supply_chains  Clayton_Christensen  disruption  brands  Old_Navy  Banana_Republic  Madewell  digital_influencers  TPG  fast-fashion  disposability 
may 2017 by jerryking
How Sephora Is Thriving Amid a Retail Crisis - The New York Times
By LAURA M. HOLSONMAY 11, 2017

Much has been written about the crisis in retail, with shoppers deserting department stores for e-tailers and fast fashion, if they shop at all. The beauty business, though, has not had the same fate. Prestige beauty sales in the United States rose 6 percent in the 12 months ending in February, tallying $15.9 billion, according to the market research company NPD Group. Makeup alone is up 11 percent, totaling $7.3 billion. But that industry, too, is in the midst of its own upheaval, driven in part by the success of stores such as Sephora, the No. 1 specialty beauty retailer in the world....Bloggers and YouTube stars, Instagram videos and virtual assistants are replacing department store sales clerks, whose customers now know as much as they do (or more) about mermaid eyes and ombré lips. Brand loyalty is out, replaced by Sephora’s try-more-buy-more ethos. Friends hold as much sway these days as trained experts....two out of five women between ages 18 and 54 wear five or more makeup products every day. “It defines the selfie-obsessed, image-driven culture of our time,” .... There are more voices. And we are trying to cut through the confusion,” in part by allowing customers to try before they buy.....“It is easy to kill time, play around with things and then spend more money than I should,” ...“I am experimenting a lot, trying to figure out what I like.” She doesn’t shop at department stores. “I don’t associate [Sephora] with makeup,”....In 2015, Sephora opened its Innovation Lab in a converted warehouse in San Francisco to experiment with ways to combine mobile apps and in-store shopping into a cohesive experience. As a result of their efforts, customers can have as little or as much personal contact they want in stores ...Now department stores are scrambling to follow suit.
Sephora  beauty  retailers  crisis  LVMH  Instagram  brands  millennials  social_media  digital_influencers  experimentation  time_sink  play  Macy’s  Bloomingdale’s  cosmetics  makeup  customer_experience  experiential_marketing  image-driven  self-absorbed  fast_fashion  in-store 
may 2017 by jerryking
Brandy Melville and the rise of the Instabrand
March 17, 2017 | FT via | Evernote Web | by Jo Ellison.

its place in the broader fashion landscape has remained deliberately low-profile. It has never placed an advertisement. It keeps its store numbers low — although it has a busy online business. And, unlike the showy founders of comparable youth-centric fashion brands, such as the now-defunct American Apparel, its executives rarely do press.
Instead, Brandy Melville is an entirely millennial phenomenon, propagated and fed by its mostly pubescent patrons, for whom it holds a cult-like appeal. Most discover it on Instagram, where its 3.9m followers can admire a seemingly never-ending feed (pictured below) of honey-blonde, tawny-limbed beauties skipping around piers, beachfronts, cafés and libraries in teeny-tiny shorts and cute slogan cropped tops.....The social media site launched in 2011 and has been tagging, sharing and enrolling followers ever since: many of its stars are professional models; others are just fangirls who have been picked up as brand ambassadors, picking up hundreds of thousands of their own acolytes in the process.....What’s interesting is how efficiently the brand has communicated its message. While labels have traditionally depended on print campaigns, bricks-and-mortar visibility and custom-built marketing, Brandy Melville’s success has been built on shares and likes alone.
And parents, like me, have been complicit in its success.....quite thrilling to have discovered a brand about which I knew nothing at all, and which never wanted my attention, either. Although it will happily use me as a conduit for cash. Instabrands like this are now popping up all over the retail landscape, and there’ll be more to come as the culture becomes ever more evolved. As a lesson in millennial shopping habits
fashion  brands  girls  retailers  California  millennials  Instagram  social_media  teenagers  bricks-and-mortar  shopping_habits 
march 2017 by jerryking
Little Brother
Sep 11th 2014 | The Economist | Alexandra Suich.

In 1963 David Ogilvy, the father of Madison Avenue and author of a classic business book, “Confessions of an Advertising Man”, wrote: “An advertisement is like a radar sweep, constantly hunting new prospects as they come into the market. Get a good radar, and keep it sweeping.”.....Behavioural profiling has gone viral across the internet, enabling firms to reach users with specific messages based on their location, interests, browsing history and demographic group......Extreme personalisation in advertising has been slow to come... online advertising space is unlimited and prices are low, so making money is not as easy as it was in the offline world,.....Digital advertising is being buoyed by three important trends. The first is the rise of mobile devices, such as smartphones....The second, related trend is the rise of social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, which have become an important navigation system for people looking for content across the web. ......The third big development has been the rise of real-time bidding, or “programmatic buying”, a new system for targeting consumers precisely and swiftly with online adverts. Publishers, advertisers and intermediaries can now bid for digital ads electronically and direct them to specific consumers at lightning speed.....The lines between established media businesses are becoming blurred. Richard Edelman, the boss of Edelman, a public-relations firm, describes the media and advertising business as a “mosh pit”. .... clients’ biggest question is whether people will even notice their ads. ...This special report will show that technology is profoundly changing the dynamics of advertising. Building on the vast amount of data produced by consumers’ digital lives, it is giving more power to media companies that have a direct relationship with their customers and can track them across different devices. ....Consumers may gain from advertising tailored to their particular needs, and so far most of them seem content to accept the ensuing loss of privacy. But companies are sensitive to the potential costs of overstepping the mark. As the head of one British advertising firm puts it: “Once people realise what’s happening, I can’t imagine there won’t be pushback.”
Facebook  Twitter  Pinterest  Ogilvy_&_Mather  David_Ogilvy  behavioural_targeting  pushback  books  effectiveness  haystacks  privacy  native_advertising  ad-tech  Conversant  Kraft  personalization  trends  mobile_phones  smartphones  social_media  real-time  auctions  programmatic  advertising  online_advertising  Omnicom 
february 2017 by jerryking
Tyler Brûlé on his aversion to social media and success with Monocle - The Globe and Mail
SIMON HOUPT
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Nov. 02, 2016

Monocle magazine – “a briefing on global affairs, business, culture & design” – is the London-based centrepiece of a growing brand, which now includes radio programming, travel guides, a string of retail boutiques, and cafés in London and Tokyo; he also owns Winkreative, a creative marketing agency that does work for clients such as Porter Airlines....Monocle is said to be profitable. What can other media learn from its success?[Answer] I think it pays to be conservative, from a business perspective. We’ve been fortunate that we don’t have the deepest pockets in the world, and so we’ve had to be very careful. But I think that’s kind of good for us, and we’re very happy that we haven’t done a tablet edition and we haven’t chucked tons of money where there is no revenue. And that’s the key thing: We haven’t felt the pressure to be on social media and to do all the things that everyone else does.
Simon_Houpt  Tyler_Brûlé  Monocle  magazines  design  journalism  niches  elitism  social_media 
december 2016 by jerryking
Monocle editor-in-chief Tyler Brûlé is a rare believer in print - The Globe and Mail
ERIC REGULY - EUROPEAN BUREAU CHIEF
LONDON — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 23, 2016

Wallpaper was Mr. Brule’s first media success story, even if it was, for him, a financial dud. ...Wallpaper, focused on fashion, design, travel and art and, as does Monocle today, highlighted top-quality products and services as opposed to merely “luxury” offerings in all their potential vulgarity. The magazine was launched in 1996 – “It ran out of money right away” – and Mr. Brûlé sold it to Time Warner (now Time Inc.) a year later. In 1998, Wallpaper started Winkreative, a brand design and strategy agency that, lately, designed the brand image of Toronto’s Union Pearson Express.....Across the street are two trim shops – Trunk Labs and Trunk Clothiers – that sell horrendously expensive travel and clothing items such as the Begg Arran scarf, apparently made from the wool of caviar-fed sheep; yours for €345 (almost $500 Canadian).

On the same street is the little, ship-shape Monocle Café...The Monocle Shop is around the corner. In nearby Paddington, Monocle is experimenting with Kioskafé, a news and coffee shop that sells 300 magazine titles and thousands of print-on-demand titles, including The Globe and Mail.

Mr. Brûlé says the collective revenue for the publishing, agency and retail spreads are about $50-million. “We’re disappointingly small,” he says.
Eric_Reguly  Tyler_Brûlé  Monocle  digital_media  cosmopolitan  stylish  print_journalism  magazines  journalism  entrepreneur  branding  niches  elitism  social_media 
december 2016 by jerryking
Twitter’s Troubles and Snap’s Appeal: It’s All About the Mojo
OCT. 11, 2016 | - The New York Times| By STEVEN DAVIDOFF SOLOMON.

User growth is the secret sauce of internet valuations. Revenue and earnings are forgiven if you can show growth in users. Whether that makes sense, of course, is another matter.....Sharp leadership — whether that is from its chief executive, Jack Dorsey, or new blood — could certainly help Twitter exploit its huge user base.

But the problem is that in the eyes of the Valley, Twitter has lost its mojo.

Even as Twitter was deflating, another social media darling, Snapchat, now renamed Snap, was riding high as reports emerged that the start-up, known for its disappearing messages, was preparing for a public offering that could value it for as much as $25 billion.
Twitter  Snapchat  momentum  valuations  Silicon_Valley  social_media  youth  mojo  special_sauce  customer_growth  user_growth  user_bases 
october 2016 by jerryking
HOW TO: Land a Business Development Job
So you want to be a business development professional? The job title has certainly become a coveted one of late, especially in the tech sector where the business guys and gals are the ones forging newsworthy partnerships.
The question is, do you know what the job entails? Even then, do you know how and where to start on this newfound career path? Or better yet, do you have the qualities that make for success in these always-on positions?
Mashable interviewed six experts in the field at various stages in their careers to get their tips on what it takes to become a business development professional at technology companies and startups.
Biz Dev ProsHere is some background information on these six seasoned business development professionals.
Charles Hudson: Newly turned entrepreneur Charles Hudson was the vice president of business development at Serious Business, a top social game developer acquired by Zynga in February. Previous engagements include senior business development positions at Gaia Online and Google. Hudson also produces two conferences focused on gaming: Virtual Goods Summit and Social Gaming Summit. Hudson is now co-founder of Bionic Panda Games.
Jesse Hertzberg: Hertzberg is the former vice president of operations and business development at Etsy, the immensely popular social commerce site for handmade and vintage items now valued at close to $300 million. Hertzberg currently advises a number of startups, including Squarespace, and is the founder of BigSoccer.
Matt Van Horn: Van Horn is the vice president of business development at the super stealth startup Path. His past jobs include more than three years working in business development for Digg, as well as a four-year stint with Apple while attending college.
Tristan Walker: Walker is the up-and-coming investment-banker-turned-tech-star heading Foursquare’s business development efforts. Walker is directly responsible for coordinating a majority of the trendy startup’s biggest strategic partnerships. This role has also brought considerable visibility to Walker, who’s been featured in Vibe Magazine, as well as named in The Hollywood Reporter’s Digital Power 50 list, Black Enterprise’s 40 Next list and Mediaweek’s 50:20 to Watch list.
Jason Oberfest: Oberfest is the vice president of social applications at game developer Ngmoco, which was recently acquired by DeNA for $300 million with a potential $100 million more in post-acquisition bonuses. Prior to joining to Ngmoco, Oberfest was the senior vice president of business development at MySpace, and before that the managing director of business development at Los Angeles Times Interactive.
Cortlandt Johnson: Johnson is the chief evangelist at SCVNGR and actively works to recruit businesses to participate in the startup’s rewards program. Johnson also co-founded DartBoston, an event-centric community designed to connect entrepreneurs and professionals in the Boston area.
Education and Internships

What undergraduate school should I attend? Do I need to go to grad school? What about internships? These are all questions you’re likely to face as you explore a future in business development. The esteemed professionals we interviewed all have backgrounds of varying degrees, so we asked for their input on these subject matters.
Walker’s own personal story is perhaps the most unique example of how to come by a business development position. While certainly making his mark in business development now, Walker initially pursued a career on Wall Street before packing it up and heading to Stanford Graduate School of Business, a shift that pushed him in the tech direction.
All things considered, does Walker recommend internships? “Certainly depends,” he says. However, based on his own internship experiences, “if you want to work in tech long term, interning at an investment bank may not make the most sense,” he jokes.
Hertzberg is a big proponent of internships. “Interning is the best job interview you can ever get, and is critical to beginning to build your professional network. Some of my favorite professional relationships are with folks who once interned for me,” he says.
Johnson suggests going after internships that push you outside your comfort zone. “The goal of my internships was to learn how to interact with all kinds of people. I always went after positions that forced me into different types of situations, whether they be social or otherwise,” says Johnson.
Grad school is something Walker has a bit more conviction about. In his words, “B-school” is “very important … not only for the skills (i.e. accounting, finance, operations, etc.) that could be beneficial for all managers to comprehend long term, but also for the softer skills of ‘people management.’”
Oberfest found an immediate opening in the biz dev field right as he was starting out. “I was fortunate to get my career started at the beginning of the first Internet boom, so for me it was trial by fire,” he explains.
If you’re on the fence about grad school, consider the following statement from Oberfest. “Grad school can help, but [it] is not a requirement. Good knowledge of the mechanics of deals — how to structure and negotiate deals — is an important component of the job and an MBA or JD can certainly help there, but I think the single most important attribute of an exceptional business development person is good product intuition.”[jk: being product-orientated}
Van Horn is also proof that graduate degrees aren’t absolute requirements. “I’ve never attended graduate school, but if you’re able to attend a top tier school, I hear you build an incredible network for life,” he says.
Instead, Van Horn spent his undergraduate college years working for Apple. “It’s very powerful to have a big brand behind your resume,” Van Horn shares. “I worked for Apple for four years doing campus marketing while in college and it helped a lot.”
For Hertzberg, his MBA, “was worth half of what I paid for it, as I already had a business background.” But, he says, “The network is why you go and, yes, that has been worth its weight in gold.”
Required Reading

All of the professionals we talked to strongly advocate that those aspiring to work in the field read up on mentors past.
Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time, by Keith Ferrazzi is Van Horn’s personal favorite read.Johnson, who also recommends Never Eat Alone, finds Tim Sanders’s Love is the Killer App: How to Win Business and Influence to be an important read as well.Walker suggests that business development professionals-in-training pick up a copy of Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert Cialdini.Unfortunately, it takes more than a few good books to read your way to success. Hertzberg recommends an aggressive approach to ongoing education that entails consuming as much information as possible.
“Read industry rags voraciously and know who is starting up, who is funded, who is growing, who is cutting what deals, etc.” he says. “Have a deep and holistic understanding of the industry and marketplace beyond just your company’s focus.”
Hudson strongly advises that, “all BD people, especially start-up BD people, should read Steve Blank’s work on customer discovery. That’s a big part of your job.” You might also want to start by reading Hudson’s own in-depth article on what being the “business guy” at a startup entails.
Must-Have Qualities

If you want to work in business development, and do so successfully, these experts agree that there’s one thing you absolutely need — a tangible passion for product.
In actionable terms, Walker describes this as a “tireless hustle.” Van Horn agrees. “I think you need to be passionate and have hustle,” he says.
Van Horn also recommends being an “early adopter of interesting products. If you’re looking for a technology job, make sure you use every awesome sounding new product you read on Mashable.”
Those best suited for business development roles are the make-it-work types, says Johnson. “The most successful people I’ve met are those who know how to quickly adapt and hustle to find ways to overcome any obstacles put in their way,” he advises.
Oberfest believes these three qualities are key: the ability to “quickly read people,” innate negotiation sensibilities and an appreciation for long-term relationships.
Hertzberg reminds that “you have to like people,” if you want to do well in a biz dev role.
Hudson agrees and points to human-to-human interaction as a huge part of the job. “If you want to go into business development, I think you have to be good at dealing with and understanding people. If you’re not comfortable with interpersonal communications and relationship management, it probably isn’t the right job for you,” he says.
On the flip side, Walker says that those possessing a “lack of humility” are least suited for biz dev positions. In a similar vein, Hertzberg says, “Be humble. Always represent your company’s brand faithfully. Constantly work to enhance and preserve that brand. Remember that your personal brand will never be bigger than your company’s.”
Getting Your First Biz Dev Job

For those just looking to get their foot in the door somewhere, knowing the answer to the question, “How does one get a biz dev job?” is of the utmost importance. We posed this particular question to our professionals, who all have slightly different, but uniquely encouraging takes on how and where to get started.
“For me it started with just recognizing the pretty significant business opportunity at a startup that I was already passionate about,” says Walker. “It always starts with product, then recognizing the opportunity on top of that.”
If you’re still an entry-level professional, Oberfest recommends not taking a job in business development at first, but rather in product management.
“I would first go work as a product manager in the industry you are passionate … [more]
business_development  job_search  social_media  social_networking  marketing  product-orientated  tristan_walker  via:sfarrar  thinking_holistically  top-tier  the_single_most_important 
august 2016 by jerryking
How I learnt to love the economic blogosphere
July 27, 2016 | FT.com | Giles Wilkes.

Marginal Revolution
Econlog
Cafe Hayek
Stumbling and Mumbling
Brad Delong
Nick Rowe - Worthwhile Canadian Initiative
Steve Randy Waldman - Interfluidity
Slack Wire - JW Mason

"Sympathetic opinions coalesce in clusters of mutual congratulation (“must read: fellow blogger agreeing with my point of view!”). Dispute is often foully bad-tempered. Opposing positions are usually subject to a three-phased assault of selective quotation, exaggeration and abuse.'..."Lacking an editor to roll their eyes and ask what’s new, many writers soon become stale... Editors exist not only to find interesting pieces to publish but also to hold at bay the unstructured abundance of bilge that we do not need to read."....."...nothing as reliably good as the (eonomics) blogosphere. Some of its advantages are simply practical: free data, synopses of academic papers that the casual dilettante is unlikely to ever come across, a constant sense of what clever people are thinking about. But what is better is how its ungated to-and-fro lets a reader eavesdrop on schools of academic thought in furious argument, rather than just be subject to whatever lecture a professor wishes to deliver. No one learns merely by reading conclusions. It is in the space between rival positions that insight sprouts up, from the synthesis of clashing thoughts. Traditional newspaper columns are delivered as if to an audience of a million, none of whom might reply. The best blogs are the opening salvo in a seminar rather than the last word on the matter. They dumb down less "....."Ancient thinkers such as Adam Smith, John Maynard Keynes and Iriving Fisher were deployed not as some sort of academic comfort blanket but because their insights are still fresh, and beautifully written."..."Reading the economic blogosphere in 2008 felt to me like the modern equivalent of watching Friedrich Hayek, Keynes and Friedman quarrelling in front of a graduate class about how FDR should react to the depression. "...."Interfluidity is where to find such brilliancies as “the moral case for NGDP [Nominal Gross Domestic Product] targeting”, a political look at a seemingly technical subject, and “Greece”, a furious examination of how the term “moral hazard” is being traduced in the euro crisis. "..."Waldman’s thoughts go far beyond such a crude duality. After a long discussion of measurement problems, the institutional constraints on innovation and much more, he zeroes in on how governments build institutions to handle the disruption wrought by technological change. In a few hundred words he flips around Cowen’s stance and, instead of looking at the growth of government as the problem, makes a case for its opposite. Technological change creates concentrations of power, which “demands countervailing state action if any semblance of broad-based affluence and democratic government is to be sustained”. We have always needed institutions to divert spending power to those left behind, otherwise social disaster beckons. "....When reading, look for sources with something new to say!
economics  economists  blogosphere  Tyler_Cowen  Paul_Krugman  Adam_Smith  information_overload  social_media  Brad_Delong  blogs  Friedrich_Hayek  Milton_Friedman  political  economy  editors  tough-mindedness  FDR  Great_Depression  insights  John_Maynard_Keynes  sophisticated  disagreements  argumentation  technological_change  innovation_policies  moral_hazards 
july 2016 by jerryking
Algorithms Need Managers, Too
January/February 2016 | HBR | by michael Luca, Jon Kleinberg and Sendhil Mullainathan.
algorithms  HBR  tools  social_media 
may 2016 by jerryking
How to right the Conservative ship - The Globe and Mail
TONY CLEMENT
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Dec. 23, 2015

Over time, Conservatives must not shy away from a broader suite of policy solutions as an alternative to what the Liberals and NDP have on offer. For example, can Conservatives have a distinctively conservative policy on poverty elimination? What is the Conservative vision regarding the relationship with indigenous peoples? How about an environmental policy that is consistent with Canadian values? Or Internet rights and responsibilities? Answers to these questions will require a good amount of consultation and discussion, and will require time and energy. But there is no reason why Conservatives cannot offer compelling alternatives to Liberal and NDP policies.

There are also critical issues facing the Conservative Party as an electoral machine. We must also do a better job of organizing and training in our Conservative ranks, and adapt far better to the new online world. Better social media presence is just the start of the effort. Community is now defined not only as what exists in our cities and towns but the virtual communities of the online world. Our volunteers must be motivated and welcomed. Feedback loops from the field must be taken seriously.

We must also not write off 100 or more electoral districts without a fight. I would like to see an organizational unit within our party, specifically charged with how to make hard-to-win ridings easier to win.
renewal  Conservative_Party  post-mortems  Liberals  NDP  politics  think_tanks  online_communities  aboriginals  environment  social_media 
december 2015 by jerryking
All hail the hashtag: How retailers are drawing you in, one Facebook post at a time - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 29, 2015

Welcome to Retail 3.0, in which retailers use social media in a bid to draw young shoppers such as Campos back to bricks-and-mortar outlets.

Just a few years ago trendy shops lured consumers with an in-store coffee bar or barber shop. But today a hot brew or hair trim isn’t enough: Retailers increasingly feel the pressure to attract cyber-savvy shoppers to their physical outlets with eye-catching social media experiences that can be shared multiple times.

The social-media initiatives range from fitting rooms in Kate Spade stores that provide a backdrop for selfies with “like?” in a speech bubble to luxury parka purveyor Nobis installing photo booths at its store launch parties; and department store Nordstrom, whose roots are in shoes, encouraging shoppers to “shoefie” (take a selfie of their footwear) next to the store’s name. The images, uploaded on social media, put a spotlight on the brands.....social-media posts can pump up sales during an event as much as 20 per cent. About 60 per cent of Canadian consumers say they’ve come into contact with different products and brands through social media and, of those, 46 per cent say the interactions resulted in them making more purchases, up from 32 per cent in 2014, according to a survey this year by consultancy PwC.
digital_influencers  event-driven  social_media  Retail_3.0  imagery  Marina_Strauss  product_launches  selfies  retailers  millennials  Instagram  Facebook  e-commerce  bricks-and-mortar  in-store  footwear 
october 2015 by jerryking
What a Year of Job Rejections Taught Me About Pitching Myself
SEPTEMBER 09, 2015 | HBR | Nina Mufleh.
[send to Nick Patel]
After sending out hundreds of copies of my résumé to dozens of companies over the last year, I realized that I was getting nowhere because my approach was wrong....How could a career that ranged from working with royalty to Fortune 500 brands and startups not pique the curiosity of any hiring managers?

As a marketer, I decided to re-frame the challenge. Instead of thinking as a job applicant, I had to think of myself as a product and identify ways to create demand around hiring me. I applied everything I knew about marketing and storytelling to build a campaign that would show Silicon Valley companies the kind of value I would bring to their teams.

The experiment was a report that I created for Airbnb that highlighted the promise and potential of expanding to the Middle East, a market that I am extremely familiar with and until recently they had not focused on. I spent a couple of days gathering data about the tourism industry and the company’s current footprint in the market, and identified strategic opportunities for them there.

I released the report on Twitter and copied Airbnb’s founders and leadership team. Behind the scenes, I also shared it by email with many personal and professional contacts and encouraged them to share it if they thought it was interesting — most did, as did some of the top VCs, entrepreneurs and many peers around the world....What I realize in hindsight is probably one of the most important lessons of my career so far. The project highlighted the qualities I wanted to show to recruiters; more importantly, it also addressed one of the main weaknesses they saw in me....What the report helped me do was show, not tell, my value beyond their doubts. It refocused my perceived weakness into a strength: an international perspective with the promise of understanding and entering new markets. And though none of the roles that I interviewed for in the last two months focused on expansion, by addressing and challenging the weakness, I was able to re-frame the conversation around my strengths....asking yourself a different version of that question is going to make you better prepared for any conversation with a recruiter, a potential client, or even a potential investor....not “What is my weakness?” but rather “What do they perceive as a weakness in my background?”
Airbnb  campaigns  career_paths  creating_demand  Fortune_500  founders  HBR  hindsight  inbound_marketing  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  Middle_East  networking  personal_branding  pitches  problem_framing  reframing  rejections  self-promotion  social_media  strengths  value_propositions  via:enochko  weaknesses 
september 2015 by jerryking
Sree Sreenivasan
| Fast Company | Business + Innovation

What is something about your job that you think would surprise people?
Most people are surprised to know that the digital media team at the Met has 70 people in it. Our world-class team works on topics I love: web, digital, social, mobile, video, data, email, gallery interactives, media lab, and so much more. We like to run our team like a 70-person startup inside a 145-year-old company.

People always ask me how I justify the museum spending so many resources of digital media. I would always talk about the importance of connecting the physical and the digital, the in-person and the online (here's a TEDx talk I gave on this topic). But I recently got concrete proof that I've been sharing with anyone who will listen.

The photographer Carleton Watkins shot photos in 1861 of Yosemite that he showed to President Lincoln and inspired him to sign legislation that protected Yosemite forever and started the conservation movement. He did this without ever seeing Yosemite, just the facsimiles. We had an exhibition of these beautiful photos and they make the case better than I can for the value of something artificial (or digital) to inspire support, interest, and more, for something real.
innovation  digital_media  social_media  museums  cyberphysical  New_York_City  executive_management  partnerships  analog  meat_space  Sree_Sreenivasan  digital_strategies  physical_assets  physical_world  Abraham_Lincoln  photography  Yosemite  conservation 
may 2015 by jerryking
Snapchat and Periscope: A Grown-Up’s Guide - WSJ
By KEVIN SINTUMUANG
Updated May 15, 2015

Remember that by default, everything you post disappears. Periscope and Meerkat broadcasts are intended to be live events; each element of a Snapchat Story expires after 24 hours. Although you can set the apps to save your videos (and, on Periscope, have them viewable for 24 hours), that’s not the point...there’s someone giving you a tour of the Louvre or a celebrity engaging with fans in an authentic way. For every incomprehensible Dadaist Snapchat Story that only a teenager could interpret, there is another that makes an ordinary day seem significant. And using Snapchat as a communication tool turns ordinarily mundane messages into something more charming, direct and personal.
social_media  Snapchat  Periscope  ephemerality  howto  mobile_applications  Meerkat  livestreaming  web_video 
may 2015 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria: ‘We are meant to be engaged with the big questions’ - The Globe and Mail
RUDYARD GRIFFITHS
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 17 2015

Q: How is your defence of a liberal-arts education more than nostalgia for a bygone era of higher learning, now out of sync with today’s hyper-competitive, skills-based economies?

...what’s happening in advanced manufacturing. In almost every industry, basic production is getting commoditized. It’s becoming routine and simple, and most everything we consume, to put it bluntly, can be made by a machine or a factory worker. You can manufacture a $30 sneaker anywhere in the world but, to sell it for $300, there has to be a story around it, there has to be beautiful design, there has to be interesting marketing; you have to understand social media....because product[s]stand out only if you understand how human beings use technology....Mark Zuckerberg says that Facebook is more about psychology and sociology, two liberal arts, than technology...a liberal education provides you with a rounded education in every sense of the word. It teaches you how to write, which I think is the most important aspect, because you learn how to think. It teaches you how to learn. These are soft skills but they’re not lesser skills.
liberal_arts  humanities  Fareed_Zakaria  Rudyard_Griffiths  social_media  Mark_Zuckerberg  education  civics  psychology  sociology  soft_skills  thinking  design  product_design  Daniel_Pink  UX 
april 2015 by jerryking
The promise and peril of digital diplomacy - The Globe and Mail
TAYLOR OWEN
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 09 2015

the same governments that are seeking to enable free speech in countries like Iran are at the same time rapidly expanding the surveillance state. Thanks to the revelations of Edward Snowden we now know how the state has chosen to respond to this new space of digital empowerment. Like a traditional battlefield, they are seeking to control it. To, as they themselves claim, “know it all.”

And herein lies the central tension in the digital diplomacy initiative. By seeking to control, monitor and undermine the actions of perceived negative actors, the state risks breaking the very system that positively empowers so many. And this will ultimately harm those living under autocratic and democratic regimes alike.

The answer, unfortunately, is not as simple as many critics of digital diplomacy assert. Simply returning to traditional in-person diplomacy ignores the global shift to decentralized digital power. Digital diplomacy is a well-intentioned attempt to participate in this new space. However, it is one that is both ill-suited to the capabilities of the state, and is negated by other digital foreign policy programs.

We are at the start of a reconfiguration of power. Navigating this terrain is one of the principal foreign policy challenges of the 21st century.
diplomacy  risks  Communicating_&_Connecting  social_media  foreign_policy  digital_diplomacy  uToronto  public_diplomacy  Outsourcing  Edward_Snowden  challenges  21st._century  rogue_actors 
february 2015 by jerryking
Want a strong digital brand? Then look at your offline one - The Globe and Mail
HILARY CARTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 09 2015,
branding  social_media 
february 2015 by jerryking
Risky Business: BLG Sees Cyber Risks Underlining Challenges To Canadian Businesses
December 16, 2014

Borden Ladner Gervais Outlines 2015’s Top 10 Business Risks--Borden Ladner Gervais LLP’s predictions for 2015 are decidedly more worrying, as the firm issued a top ten list of business risks. At the top of the list, the firm says, is cybersecurity and the risks businesses face from hackers, data leaks, and social media. Others include risks related to First Nations land claims, anti-corruption enforcement and consumer class actions sparked by an increasing number of product recalls.
cyber_security  data_breaches  risks  cyberrisks  predictions  law_firms  Bay_Street  social_media  resilience  land_claim_settlements  product_recalls  anti-corruption  BLG  class_action_lawsuits 
january 2015 by jerryking
Twitter Canada's push to sway the skeptics
June 5, 2014
A year after the social media company set up its Toronto office, Kirstine Stewart is pressing traditional media to take up tweeting
JAMES BRADSHAW

Among the success stories so far is the fact that all of Canada's major broadcasters signed on to Twitter Amplify, a program that lets them embed videos and other content into tweets targeted at users with particular interests. Thanks to the power of algorithms, the corporate account for Hockey Night in Canada can now blast out clips of goals scored in the NHL playoffs within moments, reaching targeted hockey aficionados who are not yet among its 248,000 followers.

The key is Twitter's ability to mine data on hundreds of millions of users - some of whom have come to view the network as an indispensable tool - that is more specific than the broad age and gender categories that have shaped decision-making in conventional television. ....marketers often carve up their budgets between conventional and digital media, which can hamstring investments in Twitter. The solution, Ms. Stewart says, is education. She has brought on board new managers to work closely with particular industries, such as head of sports Christopher Doyle, who joined recently from CBC Sports. Their message is that businesses "have to think more in real time" about reaching users, and that Twitter can be the connector.
metrics  Twitter  digital_media  social_media  Communicating_&_Connecting 
july 2014 by jerryking
Twitter Acquires Gnip, Bringing a Valuable Data Service In-House - NYTimes.com - NYTimes.com
April 15, 2014 | NYT | By ASHWIN SESHAGIRI.

In 2010, Gnip was the first company to work with Twitter to gain access to the social network’s so-called fire hose, which contains all publicly available tweets since 2006. Brands, advertisers and, recently, academics could use that stream of data to analyze and parse activity on the social network....Last year, Apple acquired Topsy Labs, a similar provider of data of Twitter activity. The terms of that deal were also not disclosed, though The Wall Street Journal, citing people familiar with the matter, estimated the deal to be worth more than $200 million.

“We believe Gnip has only begun to scratch the surface,” Jana Messerschmidt, Twitter’s vice president of global business development and platform, wrote in a blog post announcing the deal. “Together we plan to offer more sophisticated data sets and better data enrichments, so that even more developers and businesses big and small around the world can drive innovation using the unique content that is shared on Twitter.”
Twitter  Gnip  massive_data_sets  mergers_&_acquisitions  data  data_mining  sentiment_analysis  social_media  social_data 
april 2014 by jerryking
Kabbage s Fresh Idea for Small Business Finance - American Banker Magazine Article
Glen Fest
JUN 1, 2013

For the past three years, Atlanta-based Kabbage has used social media analytics in part to quantify a borrower's propensity to repay. The underlying logic, says chairman and co-founder Marc Gorlin, is that a small business actively promoting itself or receiving customer attention through these channels is a better risk candidate than a less socially savvy merchant even with a similar credit score and product line....Whereas a bank would require extensive and audited financial data, says Scott Thompson, the former PayPal president and Yahoo! ex-CEO who was recently appointed to Kabbage's board, Kabbage "offers up this very simple signup flow," where the application and approval process can take less than seven minutes.

"What they've done is they've assembled a richer set of data, they have better technology, better science, better attributes, and are looking at better signals to try to attempt to get a current understanding of what your small business is," Thompson says.
massive_data_sets  data  data_driven  Kabbage  unstructured_data  social_media  social_data  online_banking  small_business  Facebook  Twitter 
february 2014 by jerryking
Promoting Health With Enticing Photos of Fruits and Vegetables
FEB. 19, 2014 |NYT| By STEPHANIE STROM.

Bolthouse Farms, which produces juices, smoothies and other items, has developed an exceptionally playful website, FoodPornIndex.com, that calls attention to such food inequities. The company, owned by Campbell’s, wants to generate more clicks highlighting the plight of those unpopular beets and other less trendy but nutritious fruits and vegetables.

It has devised an algorithm to track hashtags on Twitter and elsewhere on the Internet and other mentions of 24 keywords for different vegetables, fruits and all those fatty, sugary favorites. Then, using alluring photographs, humor and music, the website lets visitors click on the Pomegranate Piñata, the Pizzabot or the Guac-a-Mole to get a sense of the numbers behind the item’s popularity on the web in real time....The Bolthouse algorithm checks for references to the keywords every 15 minutes. Of the 171 million posts picked up by the algorithm shortly before the site went live on Wednesday evening, 72 percent featured less healthy foods, while roughly 28 percent were accompanied by photos and posts of fruits or vegetables.

For example, the algorithm had spotted almost 13 million hashtags linked to posts with photos of pies by the time the website went live, compared to just 318,000 attached to posts featuring beets.... as more and more consumers make the connection between what they eat and how they feel and seek information about the ingredients n the foods they consume, food companies are increasingly trying to promote the healthiness and purity of the foods they sell.
fruits  vegetables  fresh_produce  diets  healthy_lifestyles  visualization  Bolthouse_Farms  social_media  algorithms  Twitter 
february 2014 by jerryking
Case Study: Edgy Ad Campaign, With Hefty Digital, Traditional PR Support, Helps the Pistachio Come Out of Its Shell
Timeframe: March - Dec. 2009

In early 2009, life wasn't all it was cracked up to be for the pistachio. In March of that year, the FDA issued a precautionary, voluntary recall for the green nut for...
product_recalls  public_relations  commodities  branding  brands  transparency  crisis_management  FDA  marketing  Lynda_Resnick  social_media  funnies  contests  virality 
december 2013 by jerryking
Networking to grow your business
1. Build your ideal network
Identify who can provide introductions to the people you want to meet, whether it’s potential clients, investors or employees. Meeting people in professional settings, such as conferences or trade shows, or even getting to know the suppliers, clients or competitors of your target clients will help you build your ideal network. Don’t be afraid to ask for introductions.

2. Create a networking strategy
Develop an action plan to connect with each person on your list. Leverage existing networks, acquaintances and events. Social media tools, such es LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, are also powerful marketing tools that all; ggoeliont way to tap into broad social circles and establish a strong network.

3. Nurture and deepen your relationships
Prioritize the relationships that are most important for your business goals and manage your relationships to get the most benefit. Follow up and solidify your relationships by - 1 W * “J staying in touch on a regular basis over an extended period of time. A smaller network of high value contacts may serve you better than a larger network. Ensure that you are getting value by tracking your activities and the results they produce.

For more information, visit cibc.com/smallbusinessgrowth.
networking  howto  social_media  relationships  LinkedIn  conferences  action_plans  following_up 
december 2013 by jerryking
Google Fosters South Korean Startups - WSJ.com
By
Jonathan Cheng
connect
Updated Nov. 17, 2013

Google has done work with entrepreneurs in other countries, but says that its effort in South Korea is the product of a realization that Google executives made about two years ago: Many of the most popular games on its global mobile-app store were ones that had been developed by Korean companies.

As the company sought out innovative startups in South Korea, however, it found that many of the most promising companies were, like Classting, built around the country's rigorous educational system.

Mr. Cho, the 28-year-old former teacher, first cooked up the idea for Classting—a social-media network for the classroom that allows teachers to interact with students and their parents—after trying to first engage his students through Facebook and Twitter.

Mr. Cho found that students weren't willing to open up their social-media profiles to their teachers and parents, or that schools wanted to ban smartphones outright in the classroom.

So Mr. Cho and his co-founder, a high-school friend and programmer, developed an app they thought could fill that need. They spent two years working on the app, which they named Classting—a portmanteau of "class" and "meeting"—while working their day jobs.

Thanks to its success in startup contests funded mainly by the South Korean government, Mr. Cho and his staff have been able to give up their day jobs. And in June, Classting brought in SoftBank Ventures—its first outside investor—as the app gained traction in its home market. Classting is now being used at about 6,000 of the country's 11,000 schools, Mr. Cho said.

Classting has expanded to 13 employees and moved into a three-story, penthouse-style office in an alley off Seoul's fashionable Garosu-gil shopping district, where several South Korean startups are clustered. Classting is now putting the finishing touches on a Japanese version of the app, which it plans to roll out next year.
Google  South_Korea  South_Korean  Classting  education  SoftBank  social_media  start_ups  Silicon_Valley  venture_capital  vc 
november 2013 by jerryking
Whole Foods' Battle for the Organic Shopper - WSJ.com
Aug. 21, 2013 | WSJ | By Julie Jargon.

"The recession was a wake-up call for us," said co-Chief Executive Walter Robb in an interview.

One of the chain's latest initiatives: nationwide "flash" sales on specific items promoted on Twitter and Facebook FB -0.02% that run for just a few hours, like a five-hour buy-one-get-one-free deal on ice cream last month. The chain also is increasing one-day sales on items like salmon, blueberries and organic chicken to 17 this fiscal year, from 14 last year.

Whole Foods long avoided such supermarket tactics, thriving instead on a pricey mix of products that appealed to clientele in upscale neighborhoods of large cities where most of its approximately 350 stores are located. High prices on everything from meat to vegetables led critics to quip that shopping at Whole Foods would eat up a middle class earner's whole paycheck....Mr. Robb last month told investors the chain is going to engage in "more aggressive price matching against select competitors," and said price reductions and promotions could start "nipping gross margins a little bit."

The strategy carries other risks. Jim Hertel, managing partner at Willard Bishop, a food retail consulting firm, said grocers who rely on short-term gains from discounts can feel compelled to "up the dosage of deals" to keep sales growing. "When you do that you suddenly start to promote so much that you take sales out of the store because everything is on discount," he said. "Customers get trained not to buy on full price."

Deals also can attract new customers who don't buy more than the item on sale and don't necessarily return, defeating the purpose—a phenomenon Mr. Hertel calls "rent a customer."
Whole_Foods  organic  grocery  supermarkets  discounting  social_media  flash_sales  merchandising 
october 2013 by jerryking
Twitter's Lucrative Data Mining Business - WSJ.com
October 6, 2013 | WSJ | By ELIZABETH DWOSKIN.

Twitter's Data Business Proves Lucrative
Twitter Disclosed It Earned $47.5 Million From Selling Off Information It Gathers

Twitter's data business has rippled across the economy. The site's constant stream of experiences, opinions and sentiments has spawned a vast commercial ecosystem, serving up putative insights to product developers, Hollywood studios, major retailers and—potentially most profitably—hedge funds and other investors....Social-data firms spot trends that it would take a long time for humans to see on their own. The United Nations is using algorithms derived from Twitter to pinpoint hot spots of social unrest. DirecTV DTV +0.99% uses Twitter data as an early-warning system to spot power outages based on customer complaints. Human-resources departments analyze the data to evaluate job candidates....While estimates of the market value of the social-data industry are hard to come by, one research firm, IDC, estimates that the entire "big data" market has grown seven times as quickly as the information technology sector as a whole. It may be valued at $16.9 billion in two years....Each social-data firm boasts proprietary dating-mining tools that go beyond basic keyword searches. Some can zoom in on a subset of people—say, women in a certain ZIP Code—and monitor phrases that show emotion. Then they can create a heat map or a sentiment score that measures how that subset feels about a topic. They have trained natural language processing algorithms to look at slang and broken grammar and to highlight tweets that indicate urgency because of words like "BREAKING."

"We don't just count the volume of these trends. That's naïve," says Nova Spivak, CEO of the Los Angeles-based firm Bottlenose. Rather, his firm looks at the momentum of trends....Many smaller analytics startups are now turning to four companies that Twitter has dubbed "certified data resellers." These brokers, Gnip, Data Sift, Topsy and the Japanese firm NTT Data, 9613.TO -2.04% account for the bulk of Twitter's data revenue. Last year, they paid Twitter monthly fees of about $35.6 million.

Twitter's exponential growth has meant its influence extends well beyond marketing and crisis PR. Nonprofits, human-resource managers and politicians have found Twitter data useful, too.
data  data_mining  Twitter  massive_data_sets  sentiment_analysis  product_development  social_media  social_data  Gnip  Data_Sift  Topsy  NTT_Data  Bottlenose  NLP  hotspots  UN  human_resources  insights  Hollywood  hedge_funds  momentum 
october 2013 by jerryking
globeadvisor.com: Indie bookstore writes its next chapter
June 7, 2013
Old-school Toronto shop exploits power of YouTube and social media to build a loyal community of customers

DAVID ISRAELSON
retailers  social_media  bookstores  web_video 
june 2013 by jerryking
Rob Ford, Charbonneau and the dark side of social media - The Globe and Mail
LYSIANE GAGNON


Special to The Globe and Mail

Published
Wednesday, May. 22 2013
Rob_Ford  social_media  scandals  dark_side 
may 2013 by jerryking
How Big Data Is Changing the Whole Equation for Business - WSJ.com
March 8, 2013 | WSJ | By STEVEN ROSENBUSH AND MICHAEL TOTTY.

Big data often gets linked to companies that already deal in information, like Google, GOOG -0.13% Facebook FB -2.16% and Amazon. But businesses in a slew of industries are putting it front and center in more and more parts of their operations. They're gathering huge amounts of information, often meshing traditional measures like sales with things like comments on social-media sites and location information from mobile devices. And they're scrutinizing it to figure out how to improve their products, cut costs and keep customers coming back.
massive_data_sets  social_data  social_media  social_physics 
march 2013 by jerryking
Car Companies Tap Data Trove - WSJ.com
March 7, 2013 | WSJ| By IAN SHERR And MIKE RAMSEY.
Drive Into the Future
Your car knows a lot about you. And it's talking....Automakers are exploring ways to use information form cars on the road to improve the driving experience, car design, fuel efficiency and financing, among other things...Improving safety, however, isn't the only way car companies can use that data. Mr. Koslowski estimates that by 2016, up to a third of all interactions between car companies and their customers will happen in the vehicle. Car companies, for example, could collect and analyze data about how customers use leased vehicles, and based on that information suggest other cars a driver might like around the time his or her lease is expiring, he says.

"They can notice all the vehicle seat belts are occupied and they can say, hey, maybe you want a family vehicle," Mr. Koslowski says....In the coming years, auto makers like Ford, Audi AG NSU.XE +0.34% and others see even more potential in big data. They envision taking information from customers' typical driving patterns, schedules and movements on the road to recommend routes the drivers might feel more comfortable with, either because they prefer city streets to freeways or don't respond well to bumper-to-bumper traffic.
massive_data_sets  automotive_industry  data  pattern_recognition  traffic_congestion  data_driven  product_recalls  social_media  telematics  customer_experience  UX 
march 2013 by jerryking
Building Buzz for Ellis Island -- and Shirts - WSJ.com
August 20, 2007 | WSJ | By STEPHANIE KANG and SUZANNE VRANICA.

Building Buzz for Ellis Island -- and Shirts
PVH's Arrow Launches Social-Networking Site Full of Immigrant Tales
apparel  social_media  social_networking  Facebook  mens'_clothing  advertising  advertising_agencies 
january 2013 by jerryking
Finding Your Niche
Nov 21 2012 | Sponsored content in The Atlantic | by
Chris Metinko.

Many companies are expanding their social reach beyond Facebook and Twitter..."Expect to see a proliferation of niche social networks over the next 12 months offering deeper functionality and greater engagement," he said.

That growth could be good for businesses, as aspiring sites such as NextDoor--which connects neighbors--or Dribble--a community of designers--can offer more opportunities for businesses trying to target more specialized segments of people with a particular interest.
-
social_media  niches 
november 2012 by jerryking
Your Employee Is an Online Celebrity. Now What Do You Do? - WSJ.com
October 29, 2012 | WSJ| By ALEXANDRA SAMUEL

The Journal Report: Leadership in Human Resources
Your Employee Is an Online Celebrity. Now What Do You Do?
Mixing social media and on-the-job duties can be a win-win. Or not.
social_media  celebrities 
october 2012 by jerryking
Social Media Upending Privacy in Real World - NYTimes.com
October 14, 2012, 12:00 pm36 Comments
Disruptions: Seeking Privacy in a Networked Age
By NICK BILTON
privacy  social_media  in_the_real_world 
october 2012 by jerryking
From Twitter to TV, McDonald’s offers answers - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Last updated Tuesday, Oct. 02 2012,
McDonald's  Susan_Krashinsky  Twitter  social_media 
october 2012 by jerryking
Journalism’s problem is a failure of originality - The Globe and Mail
KELLY McBRIDE

The Globe and Mail

Published Friday, Sep. 28 2012

Professional journalism isn’t facing a plagiarism problem. It’s facing an originality failure....We have no way of knowing whether, proportionally, there’s more plagiarism in journalism today than there was 20 years ago. But we do know that commentators now work in very different circumstances. It used to be that local columnists used the phone and their feet. They spent time out of the office, just like their reporter colleagues. They went to the bar, the barbershop, the local college, the courtroom.

Why? Because, that’s where ideas took shape. Talking and thinking, thinking and talking, then trying it out on the keyboard. That’s how writers write. Sometimes, the work was good; more often, it was mediocre. Sometimes, editors sent it back. Whatever the quality, the ideas belonged to the columnist, informed by her reporting and research but grown in the writer’s head....In our panic to keep up with a changing world, we’ve failed to identify new methods for originality. We need to look to the writer-editor relationship, to the community of writers and thinkers and to the very process that writers use to go from nothing to something.

We’re mystified by the prospect of building a culture that breeds original thinking and writing in today’s digital world. Yet, we can look to writers who are successfully hitting the mark of originality and imitate their methods.

Today’s most original successful writers often combine the new and the old to foster their thinking. Writers such as Anne Lamott or columnist Connie Schultz test out their ideas in social media settings such as Twitter or Facebook. And they stay grounded in the real world, allowing for the influence of other people and experiences.
in_the_real_world  journalism  originality  scuttlebutt  thinking  plagiarism  editors  writers  writing  social_media  testing  original_thinking  ideas 
october 2012 by jerryking
Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare as Corporate Focus Groups - NYTimes.com
By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
Published: July 30, 2012

Companies like Wal-Mart and Samuel Adams are turning social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare into extensions of market research departments. And companies are just beginning to figure out how to use the enormous amount of information available.... “There’s mountains and mountains of data being created in social media,” said Ravi Raj, vice president for products for @WalmartLabs, adding that the company used the data to decide what merchandise to carry where.

In one of its first analyses, performed last summer, @WalmartLabs found that cake pops — small bites of cake on lollipop sticks — were becoming popular. “Starbucks had just started getting them in their cafes, and people were talking a lot about it,” Mr. Raj said.

His team alerted merchants at Wal-Mart headquarters. The merchants had also heard about the product, and decided to carry cake-pop makers in Walmart stores. They were popular enough that the company plans to bring them back this holiday season.
Frito_Lay  Wal-Mart  market_research  social_media  focus_groups  data  merchandising  business_development  data_driven  Starbucks 
august 2012 by jerryking
Defending the brand in a social media universe - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER

The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jun. 07 2012
branding  social_media 
june 2012 by jerryking
In two killings, a tale of the new information order -
Jun. 06 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Simon Houpt.

The news about two murders - the shooting last Saturday evening at Toronto’s Eaton Centre and the case of the so-called Canadian cannibal - offers a penetrating snapshot of how we now consume information. Both stories emerged first in social media and were then picked up by establishment outlets, which were forced to keep pace with the adrenalin rush of Twitter and other online channels while also pushing the stories forward.

And the news accounts that emerged of the two killings carry lessons about the challenges of doing the heavy lifting of actual reporting while simultaneously trying to conduct a conversation.
Simon_Houpt  social_media  killings  Toronto 
june 2012 by jerryking
McKinsey's data whiz mines the social media motherlode
May. 25, 2012 | ROB Magazine - The Globe and Mail | Simon Houpt.

What is "Big Data"?...Let me give it a try. It’s the use of massive sets of data—typically transaction data, motivation data, environmental data, social data—to make better business decisions.
McKinsey  massive_data_sets  Simon_Houpt  Amazon  privacy  social_data  social_media 
may 2012 by jerryking
How to stay on top of your social media - The Globe and Mail
MIA PEARSON | Columnist profile
Special to Globe and Mail Update
Published Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011

for Paget Warner
social_media  small_business 
march 2012 by jerryking
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