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jerryking : solo   34

Quitting to set up on your own is risky and rewarding
December 30, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Lucie Greene.

(JCK: GO AHEAD-JUMP! ☑ February 26, 1996 | FORBES ASAP | by Andy Kessler.")
21st._century  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  forecasting  founders  Los_Angeles  solo  trends  trend_spotting  women 
8 weeks ago by jerryking
Single? No Kids? Don’t Fret: How to Plan Care in Your Later Years - The New York Times
“People who are aging alone need to make plans when they are independent and functional,” she said. “They need to learn about the resources in the community and the appropriate time to start using them.” Those services could include senior-friendly housing and the growing number of home-delivered products and services aimed at the aging-solo market, such as healthy meals and doctors who make house calls,
solo  childless  aging  retirement  howto  preparation  longevity 
april 2018 by jerryking
How to stay social when you’re single - The Globe and Mail
JENNIFER PATERSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 15, 2017
relationships  friendships  solo 
march 2017 by jerryking
Will court rulings point way to an Uber-ized work force? - The Globe and Mail
IAN McGUGAN
Will court rulings point way to an Uber-ized work force?
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 02 2015
Uber  Lyft  contractors  solo 
february 2015 by jerryking
Solo camping: Sometimes the mind likes to be alone with itself - The Globe and Mail
JACOB BERKOWITZ
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 29 2014,
camping  solo  wilderness  outdoors 
august 2014 by jerryking
The awful truth about being single - The Globe and Mail
Margaret Wente

The Globe and Mail

Last updated Sunday, Jan. 20 2013
Margaret_Wente  relationships  solo 
february 2013 by jerryking
When Going Solo Is Not the Goal - NYTimes.com
By STEPHANIE ROSENBLOOM
Published: December 26, 2012
solo  travel  dating  things_to_do 
december 2012 by jerryking
O, brave new TempWorld
September 29, 2000| Fortune |Review by Larry Keller, CNN.com/career Senior Writer
The Good News About Careers: How You'll Be Working in the Next Decade'
By Barbara Moses, Ph.D.(Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer)

To cope with this uncertainty, Moses asserts that workers must learn to become "career activists."
Know what kind of work engages you and gives your life meaning.

Sell yourself. People in their 20s and early 30s are more comfortable doing this than those who are older, she says. For the latter, she offers advice on marketing oneself in a way that's effective without feeling like a phony.

OLD OR NEW?



See if you're closer to Barbara Moses' old- or new-style worker. More



Network with others. Moses stresses that this means developing mutually supportive relationships with others, not using people or indiscriminately exchanging business cards at every function you attend.

Stay current in your field and continue to develop skills and knowledge outside it.

...It's not just rank-and-file workers who must cope with a rapidly changing workplace. The challenges can be just as daunting for managers. Moses suggests they incorporate 10 strategies aimed at keeping the troops happy and productive.

Among her recommendations: Provide skill-building opportunities, sabbaticals, career planning, mentoring and flexible benefits. She also proposes that managers try to give employees a sense of ownership of the projects on which they work.

September 29, 2000
Managing_Your_Career  Barbara_Moses  books  gig_economy  book_reviews  self-reliance  freelancing  workplaces  generations  solo  contractors  millennials  rapid_change 
december 2012 by jerryking
Rachel Carson’s Lessons, 50 Years After ‘Silent Spring’ - NYTimes.com
By NANCY F. KOEHN
Published: October 27, 2012

Rachel Carson, throughout her personal and public struggles, she was an informed spokeswoman for environmental responsibility.

She was a classic introvert who exhibited few of the typical qualities associated with leadership, like charisma and aggressiveness. But as people like Susan Cain, author of “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking,” have pointed out, leadership can come in less obvious forms.... her story is a reminder that one person’s quiet leadership can make a difference.... RACHEL CARSON’S story offers many leadership lessons, including the importance of persistence in pursuing an objective. When I discuss her with business executives, many are struck by her ability to stay focused on goals in the face of obstacles including severe illness.

Another lesson involves the importance of doing thorough research and taking the long view. A sense of context based on hard facts, along with a knowledge of history, is essential to understanding what’s at stake in difficult and uncertain situations. It also confers a sense of authority on the person who has acquired this knowledge.

A third insight concerns the juggling of personal demands and professional ambitions. Carson understood the challenge — and satisfaction — of dealing with our obligations to others even as we follow our professional drive. And she saw that this can rarely be navigated smoothly. For her, and for many executives with whom I have worked, times of great productivity were followed by fallow periods when ambitions had to be put aside for personal reasons.
solo  leadership  environment  cancers  women  non-obvious  trailblazers  books  introverts  contextual  long-term  history 
october 2012 by jerryking
Single in Chicago - NYTimes.com
By STEPHANIE ROSENBLOOM
Published: July 6, 2012
Chicago  travel  things_to_do  solo 
july 2012 by jerryking
Independent Workers Are Here to Stay - NYTimes.com
April 14, 2012 | New York Times | By ALEXANDRA LEVIT.
Brand yourself as a contributor that any organization would love to hire. Create strong profiles on sites like LinkedIn and Facebook, and build an eye-catching Web site around your personal domain name. Learn about client recruitment and retention from other sales people and business owners, and incorporate their techniques.

Be prepared to join a group like the Freelancers Union, which advocates for the rights of contingent workers, and to attend meetings so you can network, swap war stories, master best practices and support fellow contractors.
freelancing  solo  self-employment  personal_branding  contracting  contractor  gig_economy 
april 2012 by jerryking
The Talent Society - NYTimes.com
By DAVID BROOKS
Published: February 20, 2012

The trend is pretty clear. Fifty years ago, America was groupy. People were more likely to be enmeshed in stable, dense and obligatory relationships. They were more defined by permanent social roles: mother, father, deacon. Today, individuals have more freedom. They move between more diverse, loosely structured and flexible networks of relationships.

People are less likely to be trapped in bad marriages and bad situations. They move from network to network, depending on their individual needs at the moment. At the same time, bonds are probably shallower and more tenuous.

We can all think of reasons for this transformation. Affluence: people have more money to live apart if they want to. Feminism: women have more power to define their own lives. The aging society: more widows and widowers live alone. The information revolution: the Internet and smartphones make it easier to construct far-flung, flexible networks. Skepticism: more people believe that marriage is not for them.

But if there is one theme that weaves through all the different causes, it is this: The maximization of talent. People want more space to develop their own individual talents. They want more flexibility to explore their own interests and develop their own identities, lifestyles and capacities. They are more impatient with situations that they find stifling.
quirky  JCK  talent  social_networking  solo  David_Brooks  self-determination  indivualized  self-actualization  individual_choice  autonomy 
february 2012 by jerryking
Science Teamwork Needed - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 5, 2011 | WSJ | Jonah Lehrer. Sunset of the Solo Scientist
teams  science_&_technology  solo  breakthroughs  genius  collaboration 
february 2011 by jerryking
Lessons From a Soloist Who Reached the Inc. 500 List
November 8, 2007 | Inc Magazine | Posted by Terri Lonier

Recognize and Seize Opportunities - Lesson: Where others see problems,
creative soloists envision business opportunities.
Cut to the Chase --- Lesson: Candor can be a refreshing alternative for
clients, and can create a competitive advantage.
Keep Cash Flowing -- Lesson: Mixing project sizes and timetables keeps
cash flowing, builds skills, and sustains interest.
Do or Delegate---Lesson: Expand your company without increasing overhead
by creating a virtual team of experts you can rely on.
Focus on Profits, Not Revenue --- Lesson: Stay focused on profits and
net income, particularly when facing the siren call of growth.
Work the Network -- Lesson: Invest in creating and sustaining long-term
professional connections that lead to mutual success.
Choose Growth Carefully ---- Lesson: When facing decisions about growth
and the lure of higher revenues, consider all aspects, personal and
professional, immediate and long-term.
solo  ksfs  opportunities  networking  lessons_learned  entrepreneur  virtual_teams  competitive_advantage  cash_flows  jck  candour  growth  delegation 
december 2010 by jerryking
The Rise of the People-Less Business
Some fascinating data out in a new Intuit/IFTF study on small
business. One factoid that caught my eye right away was on the rise of
"personal businesses", the kind of one-person shows that helped drive
the adoption of Ebay, Adsense, etc.

"Personal businesses are a surprisingly large part of the American
economy. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, at the end of 2004 almost
20 million Americans operated businesses with no employees. Businesses
without a payroll make up over 70% of the nation’s businesses, and
almost one million new businesses without payrolls were added in 2004
(the latest available data)."

[via Intuit/IFTF]
Paul_Kedrosky  solo  small_business  lifestyles  Intuit  eBay  payrolls 
december 2010 by jerryking
Solo Entrepreneurs: Big Bucks From Tiny Computing Startups
March 18, 2008 | InformationWeek | By Alice LaPlante.
One-person companies are earning upward of $1 million in revenue
annually. How do they do it? With high-speed Internet connectivity,
mobile apps, automation, and a little help from their customers.
solo  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  start_ups  lifestyles  SaaS  Paul_Kedrosky  guy_kawasaki 
december 2010 by jerryking
Legal Rebels - 5 Business Model Innovations Solos Need to Truly Compete with BigLaw
With the financial crisis of 2008-2009, every part of this old model has come under scrutiny, even in a traditionally high-end field like IP litigation. Specifically:

Leverage. Leverage, or the associate-to-partner ratio within a firm or practice, is good for reportable profits per partner. But it is not necessarily good for clients. As clients push to cut litigation costs, leverage declines. This trend favors solos and less-leveraged practices.

Within One Firm. Historically, the transaction costs associated with assembling a team of lawyers not located under the same roof made it prohibitive to build a competitive litigation team from a network of solos. But the rise of Web 2.0 is changing that. With my LinkedIn/Facebook/Outlook network of colleagues, I can identify, customize and assemble a team in less time than it used to take to walk the halls of my old BigLaw firm. But we need innovation in the areas of contractual arrangements and the laws governing lawyers to fully deliver on the promise of the ad hoc, Web 2.0, virtual law firm.

Customized. In most areas of law practice, as the field matures, more and more aspects of the discipline become standardized.

Off the shelf. The opposite of build-it-by-hand-from-scratch-every-time [JCK: *bespoke*] . Compared with some other fields of law, IP litigation has been fairly slow to progress in this manner. It has therefore remained—relatively speaking—profitable custom work. But we are starting to see some indications that aspects of IP litigation are being made more routine, even standardized. This is a good development for the solo IP litigator. As formerly labor-intensive-but-routine pieces of IP litigation evolve into off-the-shelf modules, we are freed up to apply our creativity and good judgment to the more strategic aspects of the case, with a diminished need to spend time supervising large teams as they custom-polish a third set of interrogatories or research for the nth time how to apply the Brown Bag Software case to a two-tiered stipulated protective order. Innovation in off-the-shelf litigation modules is starting to arrive, and more is needed.

Billable hours. It has been proclaimed and repeated that the billable hour is dead. Well, maybe not quite. But it is certainly open to competition from alternative fee arrangements. We have enough data and experience now that we can start to accurately predict IP litigation costs. And we can bill a la carte, charging fixed fees for different pieces of litigation. A menu might include one fixed fee for pleading-through-pretrial conference, a per-deposition fee, a per-custodian document discovery fee and so on. Models continue to evolve. Clients want their lawyers to share the risk—to have some “skin in the game”—and to have incentives for efficiency. Innovative billing models are coming.
ad_hoc  bespoke  Big_Law  billable_hours  business_models  competitive_landscape  dissolutions  Facebook  gig_economy  JCK  law_firms  leverage  LinkedIn  Michael_McDerment  networks  patent_litigation  project_management  off_the_shelf  on-demand  risk_sharing  short-lived  short-term  skin_in_the_game  solo  standardization  teams  transaction_costs  
october 2010 by jerryking
How to Succeed in the Age of Going Solo - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 8, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By RICHARD
GREENWALD. Anybody can become a consultant. But not everybody does it
well. Here's what you need to know to thrive. (1) Think Long Term.
think in terms of the long haul, preparing for a marathon, not a
sprint.; (2) Join a Network. successful consultants are in a network or
community of consultants. These networks are important sources of new
clients. ; (3) Have Your Own Space; (4) Think Like an Entrepreneur.
Don't drift from project to project. That's a mistake. Have a business
plan or mission statement.
Be known for the work that you do/ don't do. Organizing your business.
Use invoicing software to track billing, don`t mingle personal &
business finances, and keep good records for taxes or expenses. Think of
cash flows, future investments & downtime.
affirmations  howto  solo  freelancing  entrepreneurship  management_consulting  networking  jck  ksfs  long-term  cash_flows  downtime  long-haul 
september 2010 by jerryking
A Look at New Technology for the Solo Entrepreneur - WSJ.com
MAY 17, 2010 WSJ by WILLIAM M. BULKELEY A host of new gadgets is making it easier than ever to work on your own
productivity  solo  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship 
may 2010 by jerryking
Tiny Firms Go Global to Boost Sales - WSJ.com
APRIL 17, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by RIVA RICHMOND. Small
U.S. businesses are increasingly looking to other countries to boost
their businesses through the import of cheaper or better products. By
tapping international markets directly, small firms can cut the costs of
a middleman and limit their dependence on the U.S. market for supplies.
An expanded product selection also could lead to bigger sales. But
challenges like different customs, language and legal protections,
time-zone differences and even the local weather can make that new
business hard won.
size  entrepreneur  India  African-Americans  personal_care_products  solo  small_business  international_trade  hair  women  globalization  personal_grooming  start_ups  micro  producers  beyondtheU.S.  localization  internationally_minded 
may 2009 by jerryking
Free Agent Jungle
solo but not alone. community and networking events for free agents, freelancers, consultants
freelancing  networking  business  collaboration  solo 
may 2009 by jerryking
Avoid the pitfalls of going solo
Wednesday, April 14, 2004| The Globe and Mail -- Small Business
| by Barbara Moses

Park your ego; Stay connected; Get ready for the audition; Get to the
point quickly; Specialize; Be fabulous; Be generous with your expertise;
Show your personality.
Barbara_Moses  solo  management_consulting  self-employment  preparation 
march 2009 by jerryking

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