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jerryking : spin-offs   10

A Milk Giant Goes Broke as Americans Reject Old Staples
Nov. 13, 2019 | The New York Times | By David Yaffe-Bellany.

Saddled with debt and struggling to adjust to changing consumer habits, Dean Foods filed for bankruptcy protection on Tuesday, signaling another grim chapter in the recent struggles of the dairy industry. The company, whose portfolio of brands includes TruMoo and Lehigh Valley, said it was in talks to sell itself to Dairy Farmers of America, a marketing cooperative that sells milk from thousands of farms.

Across the food and beverage industry, the challenges facing Dean Foods are becoming increasingly familiar. In recent years, consumers have moved away from brands, and even entire categories of food, once seen as household staples. The decline of the milk industry has emerged as a particularly stark example of how these changing tastes are challenging major companies whose products once crowded store shelves.
bankruptcies  Big_Food  CPG  dairy  Danone  Dean_Foods  grocery  Kraft_Heinz  plant-based  private_labels  shifting_tastes  spin-offs  supermarkets  Target  Wal-Mart  yogurt 
november 2019 by jerryking
If I was...setting out to be an entrepreneur - FT.com
January 15, 2014 | FT | By Daniel Isenberg.

“Worthless Impossible and Stupid: How Contrarian Entrepreneurs Create and Capture Extraordinary Value”.

...If I were setting out as an entrepreneur today, I would buy an existing company to scale up rather than build a start-up from scratch. I would make incremental tweaks of improvement rather than innovate, exercise cool judgment rather than hot passion and build my departure plan from day one...a lot of great businesses, such as PayPal [the online payments system] and Kaspersky [the internet security company] are carved out of, or combined from, existing assets, or are family businesses taken sky-high by the second or third generation...Rather than start a new company, I would buy a rusty old business to fix up and grow as fast as I could. I want a discarded company that is undervalued but can be dusted off, refurbished with vision and talent, and scaled up. I would be talking to venture capitalists....I know that proprietary technology is not a market maker by itself. Great marketing and management almost always trump big innovation.

Minnovation – small tweaks on existing products – is what moves the ball of economic growth forward. Neither Facebook nor Google, for example, were technology pioneers.

Big innovations are few and far between and are often the stuff of large companies with long patience and deep pockets....Next, I would drain my venture of passion and replace it with commitment, hard work and realistic and relentless self-assessment....start with a stark test of harsh neon lights, exposing every flaw and crack long before the market does so that I can fix them before the customers vote with their feet....plan one's passionless departure from the start, creating a platform to allow the talented people and partners I hire to outperform me very soon.
entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  rules_of_the_game  unglamorous  books  Daniel_Isenberg  advice  howto  passions  exits  lessons_learned  turnarounds  contrarians  scaling  minnovation  undervalued  under-performing  carveouts  family_business  proprietary  incrementalism  self-assessment  customer_risk  breakthroughs  large_companies  vision  refurbished  spin-offs  hard_work  dispassion  marketing  management  commitments  marginal_improvements  unsentimental  outperformance 
january 2014 by jerryking
Montreal’s amazing circus trick
Dec. 11 2012| The Globe and Mail | J. Kelly Nestruck

Celebrating its 10th anniversary, Les 7 doigts, a collective of jugglers, trapeze artists and acrobats from Canada, California and France, has been at the forefront of this new wave of smaller, artistically driven, not-for-profit circuses aiming to deliver thrills in more intimate surroundings and on what the troupe calls a “human scale,” the polar opposite of Cirque du Soleil’s giant spectacles. Along with these new circuses, infrastructure for the art form – theatres, a festival, maybe soon a museum – has mushroomed in Montreal over the past 10 years.

Les 7 doigts was the product of a two-day brainstorming session in 2002 by seven young Cirque du Soleil artists who wanted to branch out on their own to build sustainable careers as creators.

http://montreal.about.com/od/montrealevents/a/montreal_circus_arts_festival_international_des_arts_du_cirque.htm
Montreal  Cirque_du_Soleil  spin-offs  human_scale 
may 2013 by jerryking
Fred Wilson Turns Lost Ideas Into Ventures
January 30, 1996 | WSJ | by Udayan Gupta.
Profiles Fred Wilson of Euclid Partners, a New York venture-capital fund. His business of luring executives from big corporations and giving them new lives as entrepreneurs; Focus on forming new companies from projects which are struggling to get attention inside large corporations; Success of companies he has helped to finance.

...To find new projects, Mr. Wilson chats up contacts and scours newspaper and magazine pages for corporate projects that might have an entrepreneurial flavour. He...
New_York_City  venture_capital  vc  Fred_Wilson  spin-offs  profile  large_companies  brands  internal_projects 
july 2012 by jerryking
Eco-friendly the lure for Reisman's new stores
September 19, 2008 | Globe & Mail | By MARINA STRAUSS.

Ms. Reisman also took inspiration from Mickey Drexler, a Wall Street darling and former head of clothier Gap Inc., who is now CEO of J. Crew Group, on whose board of directors Ms. Reisman sits. "What I learned from Mickey is: You have to have a point of difference and you have to have a real passion for what you're trying to do. Second, you're not going to get it all right, which I knew from experience."
eco-friendly  spin-offs  Marina_Strauss  green  retailers  Indigo  Whole_Foods  Heather_Reisman  Mickey_Drexler 
june 2012 by jerryking
Venture Capital's New Adventure - WSJ.com
December 21, 2006 | WSJ | By PUI-WING TAM.

Usual Role of Nurturing Start-Ups Takes On a Private-Equity Twist; Mr. Lanza Becomes a Deal Maker...."I suddenly became aware that we were triggering a rollup in the sector and my phone was ringing off the hook," says Mr. Lanza, 50 years old. "It was very surreal. I'm used to wandering the halls of Stanford to fund companies founded by two guys and a dog."

Like Mr. Lanza, other venture capitalists have broadened their roles beyond investing in and nurturing start-up businesses. They more often find themselves handling spinouts -- or buying units of publicly traded companies -- as well as so-called rollups and buyouts, and generally engaging in more-complex financial transactions.

In other words, they have stepped into the realm of private equity, now one of the finance world's hottest arenas. The change could make investing in venture-capital funds more risky.
venture_capital  vc  private_equity  Intel  deal-making  spin-offs  spinups  roll_ups  buyouts  Pui-Wing_Tam  carve_outs 
april 2012 by jerryking
"The bruises of the bandwagon: ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Reality television is revealing how desperately some people want to break into business. But many fail to analyse their ideas,
Apr. 25, 2005 | Financial Times pg 16.| by Paul Tyrrell

Everyone wants to run their own business. But many fail to prepare thoroughly before scrambling on to the bandwagon. Among the television hopefuls, the most widespread and humiliating trait is a failure to appreciate that an entrepreneur's personal qualities are just as important as their ideas.

It is a salutary warning. Venture capitalists and business angels have always been more inclined to back a great team with a mediocre idea than a mediocre team with a great idea. They attach a lot of importance to what they term "scar tissue" - evidence that the person has learned from experience.

"People who are enamoured of their own idea can be great, but only if they listen really hard,"... "Nothing goes to plan, so you're looking for people you can trust off-plan." ...Entrepreneurs are more likely to succeed if they can come up with an idea that exploits their experience. This is particularly clear in product development situations - for example, where an engineer takes the knowledge he gains at a large company and uses it to set up a rival.

Research suggests that "spin-outs have a survival edge in the market over other entrants as the result of a combination of entrepreneurial flexibility and inherited knowledge"....what distinguishes successful entrepreneurs is their ability to spot commercially exploitable patterns where others cannot. Herbert Simon, winner of the 1978 Nobel Prize in economic sciences, suggests this process is intuitive: a good business idea stems from the creative linking, or cross-association of two or more in-depth "chunks" of experience - know-how and contacts.
Infotrac_Newsstand  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  pattern_recognition  personality_types/traits  television  spin-offs  entertainment  venture_capital  angels  cross-pollination  tacit_data  knowledge_intensive  scar_tissue  teams  team_risk  off-plan  Plan_B  tacit_knowledge  nimbleness  combinations 
november 2011 by jerryking
Garnett & Helfrich Capital
Formed in March 2004, Garnett & Helfrich Capital, The
Venture Buyout Firm™ is a $350 million fund for mid-sized technology
spinouts. Garnett & Helfrich Capital specializes in spinning out
businesses from large global technology companies and growing them as
focused, standalone businesses.
Big_Tech  spin-offs  vc  venture_capital  silicon_valley  technology  standalone 
september 2011 by jerryking
Less May Be More - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 25, 2004 | Wall Street Journal | by SHAWN YOUNG.
Lucent has decided it must shrink to grow. After slashing itself to the
bone just to survive, the nation's biggest maker of telecom equipment
hopes to get back on the expansion track as a more focused, efficient
company.
Lucent  spin-offs  exits  growth 
february 2010 by jerryking
Divided We Stand: Smart firms expand in pieces, spinning fast-growth units into standalone entities
Mar 2005 | Inc. Vol. 27, Iss. 3; pg. 59, 2 pgs | by David H
Freedman. "Technology is working its way into an ever wider array of
products, frequently reinventing them, and the Internet has made word of
mouth nearly instantaneous. The result: an increasingly unpredictable
landscape of "instant markets" that requires new levels of speed and
agility. High-tech companies have a way of coping. The basic idea is
deceptively simple: Instead of thinking in terms of expanding the
company as a whole, focus on new, fast-growth, "spin-up" business units
with their own identities - even if it means letting other parts of the
company languish."
growth  spinups  fractals  innovation  Apple  speed  agility  windows_of_opportunity  David_Freedman  spin-offs  new_categories  pop-ups  standalone  high-growth 
october 2009 by jerryking

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