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jerryking : spinups   4

Venture Capital's New Adventure - WSJ.com
December 21, 2006 | WSJ | By PUI-WING TAM.

Usual Role of Nurturing Start-Ups Takes On a Private-Equity Twist; Mr. Lanza Becomes a Deal Maker...."I suddenly became aware that we were triggering a rollup in the sector and my phone was ringing off the hook," says Mr. Lanza, 50 years old. "It was very surreal. I'm used to wandering the halls of Stanford to fund companies founded by two guys and a dog."

Like Mr. Lanza, other venture capitalists have broadened their roles beyond investing in and nurturing start-up businesses. They more often find themselves handling spinouts -- or buying units of publicly traded companies -- as well as so-called rollups and buyouts, and generally engaging in more-complex financial transactions.

In other words, they have stepped into the realm of private equity, now one of the finance world's hottest arenas. The change could make investing in venture-capital funds more risky.
venture_capital  vc  private_equity  Intel  deal-making  spin-offs  spinups  roll_ups  buyouts  Pui-Wing_Tam  carve_outs 
april 2012 by jerryking
Building a Platform for Growth
5/22/2006 | HBS Working Knowledge | by Donald L. Laurie,
Yves L. Doz, and Claude P. Sheer.
Sometimes building growth in mature industries means more than simple
product extensions or acquisitions. The answer? Develop "growth
platforms" that extend your business into new domains. An excerpt from
Harvard Business Review.
HBR  business_development  core_businesses  embryonic  growth  platforms  start_ups  spinups  product_strategy  product_extensions  growth_platforms  new_businesses  mature_industries 
february 2010 by jerryking
Speed Demons: How smart companies are creating new products -- and whole new businesses -- almost overnight
MARCH 27, 2006 | Business Week | by Steve Hamm. Speed is
emerging as the ultimate competitive weapon. Some of the world's most
successful companies are proving to be expert at spotting new
opportunities, marshaling their forces, and bringing to market new
products or services in a flash. That goes for launching whole new
ventures, too. (1) FIND NEW WAYS TO SPOT HITS; (2) KEEP YOUR LAUNCH TEAM
AGILE; (3), BREAK YOUR UNWRITTEN RULES; (4) HAND OFF TASKS TO
SPECIALISTS; (5) ONCE YOU HAVE IT RIGHT, REPEAT.
Steve_Hamm  speed  spinups  opportunities  operational_tempo  best_practices  new_products  new_categories  product_category  new_businesses  overlooked_opportunities 
october 2009 by jerryking
Divided We Stand: Smart firms expand in pieces, spinning fast-growth units into standalone entities
Mar 2005 | Inc. Vol. 27, Iss. 3; pg. 59, 2 pgs | by David H
Freedman. "Technology is working its way into an ever wider array of
products, frequently reinventing them, and the Internet has made word of
mouth nearly instantaneous. The result: an increasingly unpredictable
landscape of "instant markets" that requires new levels of speed and
agility. High-tech companies have a way of coping. The basic idea is
deceptively simple: Instead of thinking in terms of expanding the
company as a whole, focus on new, fast-growth, "spin-up" business units
with their own identities - even if it means letting other parts of the
company languish."
growth  spinups  fractals  innovation  Apple  speed  agility  windows_of_opportunity  David_Freedman  spin-offs  new_categories  pop-ups  standalone  high-growth 
october 2009 by jerryking

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