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jerryking : sponsorships   19

Michael Moritz, the tech investor backing books
March 1, 2019 | Financial Times | by Richard Waters.

Michael Moritz, the biggest individual investor in funds managed by Sequoia Capital, the blue-chip venture capital firm where he has worked since 1986. Forbes estimates his wealth at $3.4bn, but Moritz himself puts it “a bit higher”.

Some of that wealth was put to work this week when Crankstart, the charity he set up with his wife, Harriet Heyman, agreed to provide financial backing for the Booker Prize, one of the top awards for English language fiction, for the next five years......Moritz continues to court controversy, writing approvingly in the Financial Times of the relentless pace of Chinese tech start-ups, where workers put in so many hours they barely see their children. He contrasted them with “soul-sapping” debates about work/life balance in the US, calling them “concerns of a society that is coming unhinged”.

It is tempting to ascribe his success as an investor to tireless networking, luck and timing....entrepreneur Randy Adams tipped him off to Yahoo, which was creating one of the first web indices. That led him to Google. He took over leadership of Sequoia from Don Valentine — one of Silicon Valley’s first start-up investors — in the mid-1990s.

The firm then moved well beyond its venture capital roots, setting up arms to manage family endowments and handle public market investments. While he was at the helm, it became the most successful foreign start-up investor in China. “We understood that the world had changed and that Silicon Valley was not going to be the centre of the universe for the next 50 years,”....he still works full time making investments and sits on 10 corporate boards.

Through Crankstart, Sir Michael and his wife have made substantial gifts to education, including £75m in 2012 to fund scholarships for the poorest students at Oxford university, where he was an undergraduate. He said that the financial support his father had been given after fleeing Nazi Germany as a teenager was his motivation.....After funding some of the world’s most disruptive companies, it might seem perverse that Sir Michael is now backing something as traditional as a literary prize. But he says: “Like music and video, I think the future is brighter than the past.” Printed book sales are rising again, and audio books allow readers to consume them in new forms. “The novel is the underpinning of many forms of entertainment,” he says. “I don’t think anyone’s lost their appetite for good storytelling.”
books  charities  contrarians  Don_Valentine  fiction  Google  investors  Man_Booker  Michael_Moritz  Oxford  novels  philanthropy  prizes  Richard_Waters  Sequoia  sponsorships  venture_capital  vc  Yahoo 
march 2019 by jerryking
Unintended Consequences of Sexual Harassment Scandals
OCT. 9, 2017 | The New York Times | Claire Cain Miller @clairecm.

In Silicon Valley, some male investors have declined one-on-one meetings with women, or rescheduled them from restaurants to conference rooms. On Wall Street, certain senior men have tried to avoid closed-door meetings with junior women. And in TV news, some male executives have scrupulously minded their words in conversations with female talent.

An unintended consequence of a season of sex scandals, men describe a heightened caution because of recent sexual harassment cases, and they worry that one accusation, or misunderstood comment, could end their careers. But their actions affect women’s careers, too — potentially depriving them of the kind of relationships that lead to promotions or investments. This is because building genuine relationships with senior people is perhaps the most important contributor to career advancement. In some offices it’s known as having a rabbi; researchers call it sponsorship. Unlike mentors, who give advice and are often formally assigned, sponsors know and respect people enough that they are willing to find opportunities for them, and advocate and fight for them.....sponsors “have to spend some capital and take a risk on the up-and-coming person, and you simply don’t do that unless you know them and trust them.” But these relationships are crucial, she said, for “getting from the middle to the top.”
sponsorships  Claire_Cain_Miller  entertainment_industry  women  venture_capital  Silicon_Valley  Fox_News  mentoring  sexual_harassment  reputational_risk  workplaces  unintended_consequences  political_capital  gender_gap  personal_risk  relationships  deprivations 
october 2017 by jerryking
Toronto's Air Canada Centre to be renamed Scotiabank Arena in $800-million deal
August 29, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY ROBERTSON , JAMES BRADSHAW AND JEFF GRAY.

Toronto's Air Canada Centre (ACC) is being renamed Scotiabank Arena in an $800-million deal over 20 years that marks one of the biggest investments in naming rights in North America.

The agreement announced on Tuesday by Bank of Nova Scotia and Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment Ltd. (MLSE) is 10 times the annual $4-million Air Canada paid to attach its name to the home of the Toronto Maple Leafs, the Toronto Raptors and a number of A-list concerts and other events. Other recent naming deals for coveted sports venues in the United States have gone for significantly less. Last year, the NBA's Golden State Warriors agreed to name its new arena the Chase Centre, in a deal with JPMorgan Chase estimated at more than $300-million (U.S.) for 20 years, the largest at the time.

The play is Scotiabank's latest move to market itself as "Canada's hockey bank." Scotiabank sponsors community hockey clubs across the country, all seven Canadian NHL teams, and is the official bank of the NHL. To allow another company or even another bank to take top billing at one of Canada's premier venues would be to risk giving up Scotiabank's dominant position as a sponsor of hockey in Canada......The deal is also a representation of a boom in sponsorship spending in general, as marketers struggle to find new ways to reach consumers in an increasingly cluttered media environment.

Companies spent $1.98-billion on sponsorship fees in Canada last year, according to the most recent Canadian Sponsorship Landscape Study, conducted by Ohio University professor Norm O'Reilly in association with sports marketing firm T1. And "activations" that make people aware of those sponsorships, such as advertising, promotions and events, accounted for roughly another $1-billion. Those numbers have doubled in the past 10 years, according to the research.

Such deals are particularly important for what's known as "earned media" exposure – as opposed to "paid media" such as ads – because they mean that the sponsor's brand is baked in to coverage of everything happening at the venue. Media include the name in their coverage of teams and big-ticket matches; the brand appears in TV images of major events through permanent ads in and around the venues; on digital properties associated with bookings there; and the buildings themselves act as giant billboards. Contrast that with a media environment in which consumers are bombarded with digital, outdoor, print and broadcast ads, seemingly at every turn......MLSE will also benefit from Scotiabank's efforts to use digital and mobile technologies to communicate with the bank's customers – using its insights to connect to fans both at the rink and watching at home, Mr. Hopkinson said. The bank can also give MLSE access to its analytics team to assist in crunching large sets of data to better understand hockey fans, Mr. Doig said, and the deal will give MLSE a window into Scotiabank's Scene loyalty program, which has more than eight million members. Many of those are young people that the NHL has an interest in courting as future fans.
10x  Susan_Krashinsky  Jeff_Gray  MLSE  sports  naming  Scotiabank  Bay_Street  sponsorships  arenas  earned_media  paid_media 
august 2017 by jerryking
Oak View Group – We are here to be a positive disruption to business as usual in the sports and live entertainment industry.
Messrs. Irving Azoff and Tim Leiweke could use conferences to help Oak View Group, their venue-management company, which collects annual fees from about two dozen arenas in exchange for sponsorships, event booking and other services.
disruption  back-office  sports  live_performances  sponsorships  events  arenas  Tim_Leiweke  entertainment_industry 
april 2017 by jerryking
McDonald’s is going to play SXSW this year — Quartz
Svati Kirsten Narula
March 03, 2015

McDonald’s will host three “pitch sessions” at SXSW on March 13, offering an audience for tech startups with ideas for innovation in three categories:
Reinventing the Restaurant Experience: “This is not about tweeting, ordering online or Wi-Fi connectivity…. We are talking about multiple screens, proximity technology, personalization and even smart packaging.”
Content Creation: “Brands have to co-create content with communities, curate daily content to stay relevant, and create content with social in mind. How can brands tap into new content partners and models that can tackle these objectives?”
Transportation and Delivery: “Our existing idea of door-to-door delivery and drive-thru will soon be obsolete. Imagine a world where drones could deliver you food while you’re driving down the highway.”
The best pitch will earn the presenter a trip to McDonald’s corporate headquarters, where he or she will be invited to pitch directly to the company’s C-suite. McDonald’s says pitches will be evaluated based on “current traction and milestones,” “market potential,” “customer value proposition and service offering,” and “overall brand fit.”
brands  CAMEX  co-creation  McDonald's  SXSW  digital_strategies  sponsorships  millennials  Fortune_500  creating_valuable_content  content_creators  metrics  proximity  personalization  home-delivery  drones  Michael_McDerment  pitches  C-suite 
march 2017 by jerryking
Corporate sponsors of the arts missing creative opportunities - The Globe and Mail
Jan. 16 2015 | The Globe and Mail | TODD HIRSCH.
...the necessary bridge between creativity and innovation is collaboration – the act of allowing someone else’s experience to change the way you see the world....
It’s time to entirely rethink corporate sponsorship of the arts. Forget the silly logo on the back of the program or the complimentary tickets to the play. What artists can offer is much more valuable: a chance to peer into the mind of a choreographer, a singer, a set designer, a writer. How do they solve complex problems? And what insights can this bring to corporate leaders who are trying to solve problems of their own?

In the end it comes down to something neurologists know very well. If you want to become a creative person, you have to force your brain to see new patterns, unfamiliar terrain and uncomfortable situations. Sitting in a boardroom full of people with the same university degree and the same clothes (think dull blue suits and boring shoes) will do nothing to foster creative, innovative visionaries.

Why don’t artists offer those corporate suits something really valuable? The pitch should be: “Give us $100,000 and we’ll show you how we solve problems and design solutions. You’ll think we’re crazy – and quite possibly we are – but if you allow yourselves the chance, you’ll start to change the way your brain operates. Creativity can’t be taught, but it can be developed.”

Companies can transform the way their leaders think.
Todd_Hirsch  arts  philanthropy  branding  creativity  artists  critical_thinking  skepticism  problem_solving  sponsorships  art  creative_renewal  ideality  collaboration  rethinking  missed_opportunities  heterogeneity  crazy_ideas  radical_ideas  creative_types  neurologists  complex_problems 
january 2015 by jerryking
Marketing sponsorships relying on blind faith - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 11 2014

“One out of about every five marketing and communications dollars are going to sponsorship,” said Norm O’Reilly, a professor at Ohio University who specializes in sports marketing and a senior adviser with TrojanOne. “On one end there are those doing unbelievably sophisticated [return on investment measurement]. The Cokes and Pepsis of the world ... and there are a lot that just don’t.”
marketing  sponsorships  metrics  Susan_Krashinsky  ROI 
july 2014 by jerryking
How an endangered Walrus was saved - The Globe and Mail
Sep. 07 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SIMON HOUPT.

The Walrus is no longer just a magazine published 10 times a year; it is a multiplatform brand that finds expression in a tablet edition, a blog, podcasts, e-books, a series of short non-fiction films, speaking events and sometimes even a cruise through the Northwest Passage.

Each feeds the other, sometimes in spirit and promotional force (a podcast may offer a reporter’s reminiscences of grappling with a particular interview subject), and sometimes even financially: The events business, which will present about 30 live events this year, is now one of the primary sources of revenue.

(While other publications, such as The New Yorker, produce live events, those are usually brand-building exercises rather than major sources of revenue.)

The Walrus Foundation, the education-oriented charitable non-profit that publishes the magazine, procures corporate sponsorship, such as the one from RBC for an evening dedicated to conversation about philanthropy.
brands  conferences  content  conversations  endangered  events  Ideacity  magazines  multiplatforms  nonprofit  Simon_Houpt  sponsorships  TED  Walrus 
september 2013 by jerryking
Who's The Best Person To Fast-Track Your Career?
August 30, 2013 | Fast Company | Drake Baer
Mentors act as a sounding board or a shoulder to cry on, offering advice as needed and support and guidance as requested; they expect very little in return. Sponsors, in contrast, are much more vested in their protégés, offering guidance and critical feedback because they believe in them.

Sponsors advocate on their protégés’ behalf, connecting them to important players and assignments. In doing so, they make themselves look good. And precisely because sponsors go out on a limb, they expect stellar performance and loyalty.
Managing_Your_Career  mentoring  sponsorships  movingonup  protégés 
september 2013 by jerryking
Maybe corporate guys should mind their business
November 17, 2001 | G&M |Russell Smith

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/maybe-corporate-guys-should-mind-their-business/article1034666/

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FOmbxn4lK9kAF2nPKH151NSwTik0aFKNGvxX8OSIY6k/edit

Business people should be way more humble and not act as know-it-alls when dealing with artists and academics.....A blind faith in the efficiency of commerce goes hand in hand with a faith in technology.
Russell_Smith  public_speaking  businessman_fallacy  platitudes  critical_thinking  hubris  skepticism  contrarians  speeches  artists  academics  sponsorships  humility 
march 2013 by jerryking
How Red Sox owners got it right
Jul. 20 2012 | The Globe and Mail | STEVE LADURANTAYE.

Over the past 10 years, the Boston Red Sox have been transformed a small baseball ownership group into one of the largest sports companies on the planet – consistently high payrolls, solid scouting and clutch plays have all helped the team post the second highest winning percentage in baseball over the past decade.
sports  Steve_Ladurantaye  Boston  globalization  branding  sponsorships  advertising 
july 2012 by jerryking
Being LeBron's Partner
Jul 1, 2010 | Inc. Magazine | By Jason Del Rey
branding  athletes_&_athletics  sports  sponsorships 
august 2010 by jerryking
Food Fight at Yale Over Pepsi Money - WSJ.com
APRIL 2, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | by ERIC FELTEN. Boola
Moolah! Food Fight At Yale. On the front lines at the corporate
naming-rights game.
Eric_Felten  Yale  pepsi  sponsorships  naming-rights 
april 2010 by jerryking
Events find their feminine side
Jul 5, 2007 | Financial Times pg. 14 | by Brooke Masters and
Emiko Terazono. Companies are increasingly hosting private fashion
shows and boutique evenings to attract women executives.
ProQuest  women  business_development  networking  mentoring  gender_gap  event_marketing  sponsorships 
february 2010 by jerryking
Building Brand Runways
Jul 8, 2009 | Fast Company | by Joel Rubinson. Runways are
relationships your company can create with trading partners and
consumers that make your brands accessible, and give YOU access to
markets and marketing options you otherwise would not have. Ducati
motorcycles' sponsorship and hospitality presence (and winning record)
at the Superbike World Championship events is a runway into enthusiast
sports biking communities around the world.
sponsorships  branding  Ducati  motorcycles  Italian  marketing  events  event_marketing  relationships  Communicating_&_Connecting 
december 2009 by jerryking
Firms Funding Arts Seek a Return - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 9, 2007 WSJ article by ROBERT J. HUGHES. Businesses
are trying to connect their philanthropy much more directly with their
business goals
(1) many arts fund-raisers are now negotiating with a company's
marketing department, not just its philanthropic arm.
(2) Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University.
cultural_institutions  philanthropy  fundraising  nonprofit  strategic  sponsorships 
march 2009 by jerryking

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