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jerryking : sportscasting   9

Disney’s Big Bet on Streaming Relies on Little-Known Tech Company
OCT. 8, 2017 | The New York Times | By BROOKS BARNES and JOHN KOBLIN.

For two days in June 2017, Disney’s board of directors wrestled with one topic: how technology was disrupting the company’s traditional movie, television and theme park businesses, and what to do about it?.....Cord cutting was accelerating much faster than expected. Live viewing for some children’s programming was in free fall......Robert A. Iger, Disney’s chief executive and chairman, proposed a legacy-defining move. It was time for Disney to double down on streaming..... bet the entertainment giant’s future on a wonky, little-known technology company housed in a former cookie factory: BamTech.....Based in Manhattan’s Chelsea Market, the 850-employee company has a strong track record — no serious glitches, even when delivering tens of millions of live streams at a time. BamTech also has impressive advertising technology (inserting ads in video based on viewer location) and a strong reputation for attracting and keeping viewers, not to mention billing them.....BamTech grew out of Major League Baseball Advanced Media, or Bam for short, which was founded in 2000 as a way to help teams create websites. By 2002, Bam was experimenting with streaming video as a way for out-of-town fans to watch games.

Soon, Bam developed technology that attracted outside clients, including the WWE, Fox Sports, PlayStation Vue and Hulu. HBO went to Bam in 2014 after failing to create a reliable stand-alone streaming service on its own. Could Bam get HBO up and running — in just a few months? Bam built HBO Now for roughly $50 million, delivering it just in time for the Season 5 premiere of “Game of Thrones,” which went off flawlessly. “They were nothing short of herculean for us,” said Richard Plepler, HBO’s chief executive.

In 2015, Bam decided to spin off its streaming division, calling it BamTech. With an eye toward its own direct-to-consumer future, particularly with ESPN, Disney paid $1 billion in 2016 for a 33 percent stake and an option to buy a controlling interest in 2020. To run the stand-alone company, M.L.B. and Disney recruited Michael Paull, 46, from Amazon, where he oversaw Prime Video and the introduction of Amazon Channels.....Disney contends that a big part of BamTech’s value has been overlooked. Down the road, as other media companies move toward streaming, BamTech intends to sign them up as clients.....Though BamTech has proved its streaming bona fides, it still lacks the algorithms and the personalization skills that have helped propel Netflix to success. To fill that gap, Mr. Paull recently hired the former chief technology officer of the F.B.I. to be the head of analytics.....The level of engineering required for that enormous volume of content is no small matter. Each bit of streamable content has to be made to fit a dizzying number of requirements. Start with web browsers, ranging from Safari to Chrome or Explorer, all of which have slightly different demands. It also has to fit every iPhone and Android phone. And then there are connected living room devices like Apple TV.
algorithms  BamTech  big_bets  boards_&_directors_governance  CEOs  cord-cutting  digital_savvy  digital_strategies  direct-to-consumer  Disney  disruption  doubling_down  entertainment  game_changers  personalization  Quickplay  sports  sportscasting  streaming  theme_parks 
october 2017 by jerryking
Stuart Scott, ESPN Anchor, Dies at 49 - WSJ
By ANDREW BEATON
Updated Jan. 5, 2015

“When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer,” Mr. Scott said in accepting the award. “You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, and in the manner in which you live.”
obituaries  tributes  cancers  sports  African-Americans  television  ESPN  sportscasting 
january 2015 by jerryking
Bob McCown hits sports broadcast milestones and is still going strong - The Globe and Mail
COURTNEY SHEA
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Sep. 28 2014,

Over the past few years, friends were always saying to me that I should be “expanding my brand.” I didn’t really think much of it at first, but then about three years ago I made a list of other sorts of projects that I might be interested in getting involved in. I picked my two favourites, which were to form my own production company and to own a winery. I did both of those things, launching Fadoo Productions and buying Stoney Ridge Winery. Both have been going even better than I could have predicted. The production company recently shot the new Rush concert video which went to No. 1 on Billboard the first week it was out. It’s funny because the whole reason for starting these projects was to see if the value of this brand I had created could translate to ventures outside of broadcasting, but what I didn’t realize was how being part of new projects would contribute to my existing work.
passions  passion_investing  personal_branding  product_launches  radio  sports  broadcasting  vineyards  sportscasting 
september 2014 by jerryking
Bill Raftery's Secret Playbook | Creating - WSJ.com
JANUARY 29, 2011 | WSJ | By MATTHEW FUTTERMAN. A Sportscaster's Secret Playbook
sports  sportscasting  playbooks 
january 2011 by jerryking
TV Sports Commentary and How to Fix It - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 26, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | By SKIP ROZIN.
Sports talk should reveal the secret world of athletes and not bore
viewers with the obvious. Since television gives us all the action,
commentators are most valuable when they provide information that fans
cannot discern for themselves. We want more than a tedious dissection of
the previous play, canned facts from press releases or trivia about an
athlete's childhood. Television commentary should open the door to the
secrets from which fans are usually barred. If it can't do more than
tell me what's on the screen, shut it down and let viewers enjoy the
pretty color pictures.
sports  television  Communicating_&_Connecting  interpretative  commentators  criticism  constructive_criticism  sportscasting  athletes_&_athletics 
september 2009 by jerryking
Chicago Reader Blogs: The Sports Page
"The Wall Street Journal doesn't just follow sports. We lead
the way. Sure you might call our sports coverage analytical, insightful
or even forward thinking, but one thing you can't call it is
conventional. When we report on sports, we focus less on what you've
already seen happen and more on what will happen next. We look behind
the scenes. At the big picture. We tell stories you don't expect from a
perspective as unusual as it is engaging. And we show you the shape of
things to come. It's a whole new take on sports. It's sports in the Wall
Street Journal. And it's 5 days a week. Sports coverage has gone pro."
next_play  WSJ  sports  unconventional_thinking  sportscasting  forward_looking  storytelling  interpretative  aftermath  the_big_picture 
june 2009 by jerryking
John Madden Made Us Smarter - WSJ.com
APRIL 20, 2009 | Wall street Journal | by LEONARD CASSUTO.
Details the impact--suggests he was a transformational figure--that
Madden has had across various sports based as a sports analyst. Mr.
Madden proceeded to reinvent the job of football broadcaster, beginning
at a crucial time when television was surpassing radio as the dominant
medium in sports broadcasting. His preparation -- attending team
practices during the week before the game, studying game film, and so on
-- were all new and quickly became standard. "You knew how prepared he
was."
sports  television  preparation  indispensable  NFL  sportscasting  smart_people  trailblazers  transformational  sports_journalism 
may 2009 by jerryking

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