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The biggest gender divide is in mathematics
September 5, 2019 | | Financial Times| by Carola Hoyos.

Numeracy is vital for everyone. But according to Alain Dehaze, chief executive of Adecco, the world’s biggest recruiting company, the most valuable mathematical skills in a more automated future, especially for those people who can also communicate them to generalists, are the ability to spot patterns; to problem solve logically; and to work with statistics, probability and large data sets to see into the future.
biases  Communicating_&_Connecting  culture  gender_gap  generalists  girls  high_schools  massive_data_sets  mathematics  numeracy  parenting  pattern_recognition  probability  problem_solving  statistics  trend_spotting  women 
september 2019 by jerryking
The Art of Statistics by David Spiegelhalter
May 6, 2019 | Financial Times | Review by Alan Smith.

The Art of Statistics, by Sir David Spiegelhalter, former president of the UK’s Royal Statistical Society and current Winton professor of the public understanding of risk at the University of Cambridge.

The comparison with Rosling is easy to make, not least because Spiegelhalter is humorously critical of his own field which, by his reckoning, has spent too much time arguing with itself over “the mechanical application of a bag of statistical tools, many named after eccentric and argumentative statisticians”.

His latest book, its title,
books  book_reviews  charts  Communicating_&_Connecting  data  data_journalism  data_scientists  Hans_Rosling  listening  massive_data_sets  mathematics  statistics  visualization 
may 2019 by jerryking
The scoop on frozen desserts | Canadian Grocer
By Chris Powell  |  June 14, 2017

Though it’s still a beloved summer treat, ice cream is travelling a bit of a rocky road in Canada. According to Mintel, 90% of Canadians consume single-flavoured ice cream during the summer months, contributing to annual sales of $284 million. (Mintel pegs the value of the entire frozen desserts category—including frozen yogurt, gelato and sorbet—at $409 million.)

But while penetration remains high, the market research firm also says Canadians’ enthusiasm for ice cream seems to be cooling: annual consumption has fallen from 7.7 litres per person in 2008 to 6.8 litres in 2015, with an older population creating “headwinds” for the category.
frozen_foods  desserts  ice_cream  Canadian  statistics 
october 2018 by jerryking
Canada’s new census needs to capture nuances of fast-evolving economy - The Globe and Mail
MIKE MCDERMENT
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Nov. 21, 2015

Building a world that better suits their needs is good for the Canadian economy and it starts with collecting better data.

In 2016, the government will reintroduce the census used before the previous government came to power. Adherence to inflexible testing principles and a looming print deadline mean that a more comprehensive survey will not be ready in time for next year. I understand this – it’s prudent to get accurate data. But printing? It’s 2015. We can file our taxes online; surely, we can a complete the long-form census online.

Perhaps a better question is: Can we afford to go five years between censuses given the current rate of change driven by technology? Just look at Canada’s manufacturing, automotive, and oil and gas sectors – rapid change in a fast-evolving world. In today’s world, five years is too long to go between drinks of new data, not to mention that five-year intervals translate into 10-year timelines before we can establish a trend. It’s high time we pick up the pace.
Michael_McDerment  Freshbooks  cloud_computing  census  statistics  rapid_change 
november 2015 by jerryking
The Value of Bad Data - The Experts - WSJ
Apr 22, 2015 | WSJ | by Alexandra Samuel--technology researcher and the author of “Work Smarter with Social Media.”
*** Can I apply the idea of negative space towards evolving a dataset?

What do you do when you don’t have access to a large data set?...even without access to big data, you can still use some of the tools of data-driven decision-making to make all the other choices that arise in your day-to-day work.

Adopting and adapting the tools of quantitative analysis is crucial, because we often face decisions that can’t be guided by a large data set. Maybe you’re the founder of a small company, and you don’t yet have enough customers or transactions to provide a statistically significant sample size. Perhaps you’re working on a challenge for which you have no common data set, like evaluating the performance of different employees whose work has been tracked in different ways. Or maybe you’re facing a problem that feels like it can’t be quantified, like assessing the fit between your services and the needs of different potential clients.

None of these scenarios offers you the kind of big data that would make a data scientist happy. But you can still dig into your data scientist’s toolbox, and use a quasi-quantitative approach to get some of the benefits of statistical analysis… even in the absence of statistically valid data.
massive_data_sets  data  data_driven  small_business  data_scientists  books  hustle  statistics  quantitative  small_data  data_quality 
july 2015 by jerryking
Don’t reduce Ferguson to statistics - The Globe and Mail
JONATHAN ZIMMERMAN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Aug. 19 2014
Michael_Brown  statistics  race_relations  Ferguson 
august 2014 by jerryking
Greenhouse Flower and Plant Production
Reference: 2006 and 2011 Census of Agriculture, Statistics Canada


Author :   Siva Mailvaganam - Statistician/OMAFRA
Last Reviewed :   15 July 2014
census  agriculture  Statistics_Canada  statistics 
august 2014 by jerryking
If you ever wondered how math class could help you later in life, here’s your answer - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 18 2014 | The Globe and Mail | ERIN ANDERSSEN

Jordan Ellenberg’s new book, How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking.

In a world brimming with information, math is an important tool to help spot statistical glitches and everyday fallacies, but it’s being lost. “Math is the science of not being wrong about things,” he writes. “Knowing math is like wearing a pair of X-ray specs that reveal hidden structures underneath the messy and chaotic surface of the world.”....Mathematical amateurs have all kinds of reasons to use math. It helps them learn the difference between correlation and causation, to see the flaw in statistics, to spot a sneaky sell.

“Math is the science of not being wrong.” Ellenberg writes. In the real world, it doesn’t just find the right answers – it teaches us to ask the right question in the first place.
mathematics  books  messiness  correlations  anomalies  numeracy  mistakes  sleaze  questions  tools  ratios  asking_the_right_questions  causality  statistics  in_the_real_world 
june 2014 by jerryking
Food movements driving market shift
September 28, 2013 | An information feature for Canada Organic Trade Association | RandallAnthony Communications.
organic  food  genetically_modified  Canadian  Canada  statistics  beverages 
october 2013 by jerryking
10% of African-American Households Have Incomes Above $100,000 - WSJ.com
August 24, 2013 | WSJ | By DAVID WESSEL.
50 Years of a Dream
On the anniversary of the March on Washington, how has the outlook for white and black Americans changed?

Attitudes toward race have changed enormously. "It's not respectable today to be a racist. It was perfectly acceptable in 1963," says Eleanor Holmes Norton, one of the behind-the-scenes organizers of the March and now the District of Columbia's representative in Congress.

By nearly every available economic metric, African-Americans are better off today than earlier generations were.

Memories are short, but a few facts underscore just how much has changed in 50 years.

In 1966, the earliest year for which comparable data is available, 42% of African-Americans lived in poverty; in 2011, 28% did.

The income of the median black family, the one in the middle of the statistical middle, is 80% higher, adjusted for inflation, than a comparable family in 1963, the Census Bureau says.

And the ranks of blacks in the top stratum of American society has grown. The number of African-Americans in the U.S. has roughly doubled since 1963; the number with bachelor's degrees has increased 14 fold. As recently as 2000, there were more black men in prison than in college; that is no longer true.
African-Americans  anniversaries  MLK  racial_disparities  households  generational_wealth  census  statistics  income 
august 2013 by jerryking
Meet Bloomberg's data-driven Daniel Doctoroff
Aug. 09 2013 | The Globe and Mail |JOANNA SLATER.

Mr. Doctoroff’s job, as deputy mayor for economic development, would include rebuilding the site and pushing ahead with projects envisaged in the Olympic bid....Founded by Mr. Bloomberg in 1982, the firm grew into a global juggernaut that disrupted every field it touched, from market data to financial journalism....Mr. Doctoroff had a yen for precision and a belief in the power of data. To eliminate clutter on his desk, he never touches a piece of paper twice. “I either delegate something, I dump it, or I deal with it,”...Mr. Doctoroff’s mission at Bloomberg is twofold. The first is to sell more terminals – a subscription service that costs more than $20,000 (U.S.) a year per person and offers access to an expanding universe of data, analytical tools and news. Last year was a tough one for terminal sales; Wall Street firms continued to shed staff in what Mr. Doctoroff describes as “the fourth year of post-financial crisis adjustment.”

The second task is to lead the company into other areas and make those investments pay off. Bloomberg has launched what it hopes will become indispensable data products for fields like law and government and also for back-office personnel within finance. Then there’s the media business, which includes a news service, television, radio and magazines, among them Bloomberg Businessweek, which was purchased in 2009. Businessweek still isn’t profitable, but it’s losing much less money than it used to. The magazine, like the rest of the news operation, serves another objective in the Bloomberg ecosystem, Mr. Doctoroff said: heightening the firm’s profile so it can attract more market-moving scoops, which in turn helps to sell more terminals....On his career path: I believe we’re all endowed with a very small set of narrow skills that make us unique. You’ve got to find what that is. Most often what you truly understand makes you unique is something that you’re also going to build passion around. For me – and I didn’t really discover this until I was in my 40s, the line that connected the dots … [is] seeing patterns in numbers that enable me to tell a compelling story which helps to solve a problem. So whether it is helping a candidate get elected or doing a road show for a company, getting a project done in New York or hopefully setting a vision for a company, it’s that narrow skill.
New_York_City  Bloomberg  data_driven  precision  CEOs  organizational_culture  Wall_Street  private_equity  digital_media  disruption  privately_held_companies  Michael_Bloomberg  fin-tech  journalism  pattern_recognition  career_paths  gtd  mayoral  Daniel_Doctoroff  storytelling  product_launches  sense-making  leadership  insights  leaders  statistics  persuasion  ratios  analogies  back-office  connecting_the_dots  scoops  financial_journalism  financial_data  special_sauce  non-routine  skills 
august 2013 by jerryking
Lettuce Profile - Agricultural Marketing Resource Center
While head (iceberg) lettuce is still the dominant salad green, its consumption decreased slightly from 21 pounds per capita in 2005 to 17 pounds in 2009. Consumption of fresh-market romaine and leaf lettuce increased from 10.6 pounds per capita in 2005 to 11 pounds in 2009. The growing popularity of ready-to-eat packaged salad greens, introduced in the late 1980s, has contributed to the dramatic growth in the amount of romaine, leaf lettuce and spinach available for consumption in the United States. (Amber Waves 2007). Some of the increased popularity of romaine lettuce is due in part to the increased popularity of the Caesar salad. Leaf lettuce consumption has risen largely due to the popularity of salad bars, while both have benefited from the introduction of packaged salads.
salads  fresh_produce  agribusiness  statistics 
april 2013 by jerryking
Glen William Greenhouses Ltd
. The three producers each grew the same three varieties of lettuce: boston bibb accounting roughly 60% of total production, green leaf 25%, and read leaf 15%. These varieties were considered specialty lettuce.

Second, the producers sold their lettuce directly to large retail stores and restaurants in their areas of operation. The sellers were responsible for delivery of the lettuce to the individual stores. Urban centres seemed to be the areas where hydroponic lettuce of these varieties were sold. The chain stores, like IGA and Sobey's, were the retailers of choice for the growers.

Third, the producers did not now use, nor would they use, wholesalers to sell their lettuce. The principal reason for this was handling problems. The growers did not believe that the wholesalers would take proper care in handling the lettuce and, therefore, retailers would either not buy it, or would only pay a reduced price.

A second reason for not using wholesalers was the growers' concern about losing contact with the retailer, more specifically, the produce manger. The growers felt that contact had to be maintained in order to ensure that retailers carried the product and continued to handle it correctly A third reason for by- passing wholesalers was the 20 percent margin required by the wholesaler. From the grower's perspective, the wholesaler was not worth this cost.

Fourth, each of the growers packaged their lettuce in a similar manner.
agribusiness  greenhouses  market_research  salads  fresh_produce  statistics  case_studies 
april 2013 by jerryking
Research: Menu innovation should be a priority
Dec 17, 2012 | Nation's Restaurant News | Fern Glazer.

Sluggish traffic growth has been a major problem for the restaurant industry in recent years, with many concepts plagued by year-over-year dec...
menus  innovation  restaurants  foodservice  brands  statistics  food  slow_growth 
april 2013 by jerryking
RETAIL intelligence: FRESH CUT CATEGORY
Anonymous. Canadian Grocer122. 3 (Apr 2008): A1,A3-A5,A7.
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fresh_produce  salads  statistics 
april 2013 by jerryking
Salad Days
Dec 2008/Jan 2009 | Canadian Grocer| Darcy Jenish.
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According to the latest figures available from Nielsen MarketTrack, packaged salad sales, in the 52 w...
salads  fresh_produce  statistics  market_sizing 
april 2013 by jerryking
In the Bag
September 2012 | Progressive Grocer | by Jennifer Strailey.

According to Mintel's 2012 Fruit and Vegetables report, packaged salad mixes are the biggest seller in fresh vegetables, representing a 14.8 percent dollar share of a $45 billion U.S. market. Chicago-based Mintel further notes that 59 percent of consumers say they eat salads as meals for dinner or lunch at least once a week.
salads  U.S.  statistics  fresh_produce  supermarkets  grocery  market_sizing  lunchtime 
april 2013 by jerryking
Grocers, academics are spoiling for a fight
December 26, 2005|Orlando Sentinel | By Jerry W. Jackson, Sentinel Staff Writer.

Now, according to recent studies by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Economic Research Service, produce accounts for about 8.7 percent of total supermarket sales, but 20 percent of the profits.
fresh_produce  profitability  supermarkets  grocery  statistics 
april 2013 by jerryking
HOW TO SELL FRESH PRODUCE TO SUPERMARKET CHAINS
March 1999 | | Bobby G. Beamer, Adjunct Professor, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Virginia Tech.

The most common approach to penetrating the fresh produce market has been to identify market windows created by seasonal production variations in major production areas. To attract buyers, local producers have attempted to fill market windows left open by established marketing channels. This production
approach to marketing fails to consider the needs of their customers: the retail supermarkets and their buyers.
However, by adopting a marketing approach , growers can establish better long-term relationships with their customers and capture more benefits than merely competing with other producing regions on price. Marketing efforts must begin before production as growers learn about buyers` needs and
requirements, including grade, quality, packaging, and delivery, in addition to learning which individual produce items are needed. The marketing approach, then, requires that growers produce what they can sell rather than trying to sell what they have produced. With the emphasis on variety in the produce section, Virginia growers may find more production opportunities in the specialty item category than by attempting to meet the shortages created by seasonal production
variations.

the average produce department in 1994 occupied 12 percent of the total store space but generated almost 17 percent of the average profits for the store. Previous research (Runyan, et al .) identified the following problems that can hinder the development of a good relationship between buyers and producers:
∑ lack of consistent quality,
∑ uneven sizing and grading,
∑ product too mature,
∑ lack of advance notice of product availability,
∑ inadequate removal of field heat, and
∑ lack of organization among local growers.

CONCLUSIONS
This study confirms the conditions for market entry described by Ryan, et al .: consistent grading for quality, even sizing, proper product maturity; removal of field heat; anticipated arrivals; and grower organizations. Merchandisers stressed the importance of good relationships, stating that new producers would have a hard time penetrating the market because of the loyalty factor established between growers and buyers. Part of this relationship is that ì. . . even at a cheaper price, itís going to be hard to pry us away from [our usual suppliers] because they provide consistent size, color, packing, and delivery. If we call them up and say that weíre short and need another truck load, theyíll have it here for us this
afternoon.îThe existence of these relationships emphasizes the need for the producer to get to know the market.
Rather than trying to compete with existing relationships, producers need to identify commodities having inconsistent supplies or poorly established supply relationships.

During interviews, produce merchandisers consistently expressed doubts about the willingness of small-scale, local produce growers to adopt practices conducive to the establishment of relationships . Although small-scale producers lack the economies of size that enable large-scale producers to invest in equipment and facilities, new institutions, such as the shipping-point markets, may provide small firms with the support needed to establish market relationships. However, such marketing support may be coming at the wrong end of the production process. Traditionally, fruit and vegetable growers, like many people involved in agricultural production, view their role primarily as commodity producers. The primary emphasis is placed on producing a good product, while marketing is viewed as strictly a post-harvest activity. One merchandiser related the story of a new producer who grew several acres of Daikon, a large, hot Japanese radish. The producer was disappointed to discover that after harvesting the crop no one was interested in purchasing it. Such a problem could have been avoided if the grower had invested some time, prior to production, in market research. Unfortunately, many producers still follow this approach in the production and marketing of fresh fruits and vegetables
fresh_produce  supermarkets  grocery  howto  market_windows  statistics  profitability  barriers_to_entry  farming  agriculture  Virginia  decision_trees  WaudWare  OPMA 
april 2013 by jerryking
Supermarket Facts
Industry Overview 2011| Food Marketing Institute |
supermarkets  grocery  statistics 
march 2013 by jerryking
Trends in the Marketing of Fresh Produce and Fresh-cut Products
September 2008 | | by DR. ROBERTA COOK,Dept. of Ag and Resource Economics, University of California Davis
fresh_produce  trends  private_labels  foodservice  statistics  Roberta_Cook  food  supermarkets  grocery  fruits  vegetables  U.S.  barriers_to_adoption  surveys  slides 
february 2013 by jerryking
Consumer Trends for Fruit and Vegetable Products
Consumer Trends for Fruit and Vegetable Products looks at the STEEP model to analyze factors that affect the marketplace. It explores consumer trends in Canada, using the statistics on food consumption, how Canadians are spending their food dollar, demographics and growth in produce sales. Retail trends are explored, which include specialty foods, packaging, branding, organics, convenience foods and the ethnic market in their relation to fruit and vegetables. Finally, this information is applied to the Alberta situation, suggesting market research activities that producers and processors may consider....Statistics Canada in their report, Food Statistics - 2002 (2003), indicates that the average Canadian in 2002 consumed approximately 93 kilograms (205 lbs) of fruit and 110 kilograms (243 lbs) of vegetables (including potatoes)1. ... The greatest difference in spending between the $80+k group and the <$20k group, is found in the meat and fish category; the next largest gap is in the area of fruits and vegetables. Higher income people would spend more money on more expensive cuts of meat and more exotic fruits and vegetables, or purchase imported produce during the off-season, which tends to be more expensive.

There are now a wide variety of fruit and vegetables available (e.g., plum tomatoes, cocktail tomatoes, and grape tomatoes) (Green, 2003). Higher income households would tend to buy the more expensive varieties versus the lower income groups, who are looking for sales. The restaurant section of the chart, shows the greatest contrast between income groups, demonstrating that the difference in restaurant spending between the highest and lowest group is over $55/week.
fresh_produce  Alberta  trends  fruits  vegetables  statistics  imports 
february 2013 by jerryking
The Environmental Impact Of Wasted Food | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation
October 2012 |Fast Company |Ben Schiller,
Ben Schiller is a staff writer for Co.Exist, and also contributes to the FT, and Yale e360.

An infographic from U.K. food industry magazine Next Generation Food that illustrates the environmental impact of wasted food...The infographic includes some remarkable statistics taken from a peer-reviewed study about food waste in the U.S. Waste has increased by about 50% since 1974, and now accounts for nearly 40% of all food produced in the U.S. Across the supply chain, we lose 1,400 kilocalories per head per day, or 150 trillion kilocalories each year (kilocalories are the "calories" you see on the back of food packs). Food waste accounts for a quarter of the freshwater supply, and 300 million gallons of oil a year. That’s a lot of wasted resources at a time of water shortages and higher gas prices. The U.S. consumed 6.9 billion barrels of oil last year, according to the Energy Information Administration. ...It wouldn’t be so bad if we did something with the waste other than throwing it in landfills, where it produces methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. Food accounts for 25% of methane produced from landfills, which emit 20% of methane overall.
food  waste  environment  infographics  visualization  statistics 
january 2013 by jerryking
What is data science?
June 2, 2010 | - O'Reilly Radar | by Mike Loukides |.
visualization  statistics  analytics  data  data_scientists 
september 2012 by jerryking
Is the real problem here crime or systemic racism?
May 31, 2005 | G & M |Margaret Wente.

What the study did was record the age, race and gender of everybody stopped by police in the course of a year. What it found was that blacks (who make up only 1 per cent of Kingston's population) are stopped nearly three times as often, per capita, as whites. Therefore, it concluded, the police are racially biased.

But if that's true, then the police are also ageist and sexist. Only 7 per cent of the people stopped by police were 55 or older, while 35 per cent were between 15 and 24. And roughly three times more men were stopped than women. Does this mean the police are also biased against young people and men? Most crimes are committed by young men, and a disproportionate number of crimes are committed by young black men. Only 9 % of Toronto's population is black, but more than half of Toronto's 20 "most wanted" are black.
Margaret_Wente  Toronto  African_Canadians  disproportionality  statistics  Kingston  systemic_discrimination  zero-tolerance  expulsions  high_schools  criminality  Toronto_Police_Service  carding  racial_profiling  racial_disparities  young_people 
september 2012 by jerryking
ÜBERRICH PROFITS FOR SMALL FIRMS
November 19, 2007 | Financial Post | Jonathan Ratner.

“We certainly think the market is big enough,” he said, highlighting the more than 7,000 Canadians with investable assets in excess of $20-million and 444,000 with between $1-million and $20- million. “We’re seeing a lot of liquidity events on both sides of the border of privately held companies being sold.” BMO estimates that in the
family_office  wealth_management  Northwood  Tom_McCullough  statistics  liquidity_events 
august 2012 by jerryking
Canada's Über Wealthy
Winter 2007/2008 | Canadian Business | Joe Castaldo
Canada  Canadian  high_net_worth  statistics 
august 2012 by jerryking
Racial equality looks different from behind bars - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 09 2012 | The Globe and Mail | by Doug Saunders.

What if the statistics are wrong? What if, instead of solving its greatest social problem, the United States has quite literally removed the victims of inequality from public records and put them in a box?...All of the data used to measure the social well-being of the country, from the national census on downward, is collected by surveying households. It does not count anyone who is not in a household – that is, who is in military service, in medical institutions or in prison....starting with the hyperbolic sentencing policies of Ronald Reagan, the U.S. prison system expanded at an astonishing rate. Before, prison was for violent and repeat offenders. After the Sentencing Reform Act of 1984 broadened its use, the prison population expanded fivefold....Prison has now supplanted education and welfare as the main social service provided to the disenfranchised. Blacks are seven times more likely than whites to be in prison. It’s self-perpetuating, because imprisonment increases rates of criminality, poverty, educational failure and family breakup.

But Americans do not see these effects. Prisoners don’t appear on the census, the unemployment-rate, educational-attainment records or the voting rolls.

What happens if you include them? That is exactly what Dr. Pettit has done in her new book, Invisible Men: Mass Incarceration and the Myth of Black Progress...There genuinely have been great gains for black Americans with education. But instead of expanding these gains, the United States has used prisons to freeze half the black population out of them. Canada is in danger of doing the same to its native population under new tough-on-crime laws – and as the U.S. example shows, sticking a country’s social problems in a box does not make them go away.
race_relations  African-Americans  statistics  prisons  undercounting  incarceration  Doug_Saunders  books  racial_disparities  mass_incarceration  myths  self-perpetuation 
june 2012 by jerryking
The Trouble with Big Data
May 5, 2012 | | What's The Big Data?| GilPress

“With too little data, you won’t be able to make any conclusions that you trust. With loads of data you will find relationships that aren’t real… On net, having a degree in math, economics, AI, etc., isn’t enough. Tool expertise isn’t enough. You need experience in solving real world problems, because there are a lot of important limitations to the statistics that you learned in school. Big data isn’t about bits, it’s about talent.”.....The “talent” of “understanding the problem and the data applicable to it” is what makes a good scientist: The required skepticism, the development of hypotheses (models), and the un-ending quest to refute them, following the scientific method that has brought us remarkable progress over the course of the last three hundred and fifty years.
blogs  challenges  correlations  data_quality  data_scientists  expertise  haystacks  in_the_real_world  imitations  massive_data_sets  problems  problem_solving  scientific_method  skepticism  spurious  statistics  talent 
june 2012 by jerryking
"The jobs at the end of the universe."
3 May 2012 |Financial Times |by Douglas Board.

Messrs Brynjolfsson and McAfee suggest that no matter how fast and smart computers become, 6 skills: statistical insight; managing group dynamics; good writing; framing and solving open-ended problems; persuasion; and human nurturing; will always be in demand....three more common quantitative abilities to be valued at senior levels: making the meaning of numbers come alive either visually or in words; a keen sense for when numbers should be an important part of a story yet are missing; and not being bullied by impressive correlations into assuming causality.
21st._century  Andrew_McAfee  career_paths  Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  data_journalism  Erik_Brynjolfsson  indispensable  insights  jobs  Managing_Your_Career  MIT  new_graduates  numeracy  open-ended  problem_solving  persuasion  sense-making  skills  statistics  storytelling  uncharted_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
The sorceror apprentices; Britain's ancient building skills were dying. But now a new breed of craftspeople is conjuring them back to life
Author(s): Emma Jacobs
Source: The Financial Times. (Feb. 12, 2011): News: p1.

According to "Traditional Building Craft Skills", a 2008 study backed by ConstructionSkills, an industry-financed skills council, and English Heritage, the future of pre-1919 buildings in England, of which there are 5m, could be at risk as most of the workforce undertaking repair work does not possess all the skills required to do the job properly.

The report found that "over two-thirds of the work, of which 67 per cent is for private home-owners, is being carried out by those without the right skills and materials. This is detrimental to the buildings and stores up future problems and unnecessary extra cost to rectify." It discovered that of the 500,000 professionals working in the UK, only 507 are building conservation- accredited.
skilled_trades  United_Kingdom  Freshbooks  statistics  artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  bespoke 
december 2011 by jerryking
Where Have All the Welders Gone, As Manufacturing and Repair Boom? - WSJ.com
AUGUST 15, 2006 | WSJ | By ILAN BRAT
Where Have All the Welders Gone, As Manufacturing and Repair Boom?
skilled_trades  statistics  Freshbooks 
december 2011 by jerryking
SOMETIMES RACE IS SIMPLY A FACTOR
October 31, 2002 | National Post | Christie Blatchford

As the Star study also apparently revealed, black people represent almost 27% of all violence charges such as homicides, sex assaults and gun-related offences -- a percentage way out of whack in a city where, according to the most recent census figures, only 8.1% of Torontonians described themselves as black.

(Interestingly, the headline on this story, which read ''Black crime rates highest,'' was corrected the next day, lest anyone got the wrong impression: It was true, the correction said, that black Torontonians accounted for the highest amount of violent crime, but that did not mean they have the highest crime rate, ''which the Star's analysis of Toronto police data did not measure.'' Huh?)
Christie_Blatchford  statistics  Julian_Fantino  murders  Toronto  race  criminality  killings  political_correctness  silence  demographic_changes  African_Canadians  overrepresentation  Toronto_Police_Service  criminal_justice_system  violent_crime 
november 2011 by jerryking
Fatherless, yes, but no statistic
Oct 21, 2010 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.21 | Haille Bailey-Harris.

So one day, she went to the principal's office and the two of them developed a plan, a sort of intervention to ensure I didn't end up as one of those statistics. This was the plan:

Find other role models. My mom made sure I was surrounded by very positive adults, male and female. I'm lucky to have two big brothers, who've been great father figures, and one of my uncles sort of took me under his wing. And I was lucky to have teachers, two women in particular, who really believed in me.

Create a community family. Big Brothers and Big Sisters provided a great big sister for me. We waited for a big brother for a year, but there weren't enough men willing to join up, they said. And now I have a mentor through their program, too. My mom also enrolled me in programs offered by the school, community centre, church and public library that all helped me to feel accepted.

Nurture a love of reading. Instead of banning me from video games, my mom got me games that also required me to read (like Pokemon) and encouraged me to get books (even comics) that interested me. Gradually, I wanted to read books and, eventually, I wanted to read everything, all the time.

Do community service. My mom and I volunteer in our community because giving back makes you feel good about yourself. I've already finished the required volunteer hours to get my high-school diploma by helping kids read at the public library, and working at a homeless shelter and for the Raptors Foundation.

Eventually, with the help of our battle plan, I grew wiser and realized I had great potential (as do all children, no matter the circumstances). I started to try harder in school, I found better friends and became a role model myself.
ProQuest  African_Canadians  high_schools  self-help  statistics  fatherhood  letters_to_the_editor  strategies  family  dysfunction  role_models  parenting  self-reliance 
november 2011 by jerryking
The many fatherless boys in black families
Nov 26, 2005 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.26 | Editorials

...Yet as politicians at all three levels and black community leaders scramble for answers to the anarchy, no one has dared talk about the crisis of fatherlessness in the black community.

The silence is inexcusable. Growing up without a father present is now the norm for many black children in Canada, particularly those of Jamaican ancestry. Nearly half of all black children under 14 in Canada have just one parent in the home, compared to slightly under one in five of Canadian children as a whole, census figures from 2001 show. Two in three Jamaican-Canadian children in Toronto are being raised by a single parent...."without strong, self-sacrificing, frugal and industrious fathers as role models, our boys go astray, never learn how to be parents (or men), and perpetuate the dismal situation of single-parent homes run by tired and overworked black women. The black family as a survival unit fails, which leads to the ever-fragile community collapsing along with it."

Poor neighbourhoods in Toronto are crying out for involved fathers. The city's deputy police chief, Keith Forde, who is black, says that invariably when he speaks to predominantly black audiences, two or three mothers approach him to be a Big Brother to their sons. "Nothing hurtsme more in all I do in policing than hav-ing to say no to these parents."

Girls' lives, too, are deeply harmed in fatherless communities. At least a decade ago, Mr. Forde heard from 13- and 14-year-old girls in Rexdale, a dangerous suburb of Toronto, that the boys were insisting: "If you want to be my girlfriend you have to get pregnant for me."...The "survival unit," the black family, is being fatally weakened by the lack of fathers. No matter how helpful social programs, additional police or tougher gun laws may be, they are not the heart of the problem. Reuniting fathers and children should be the top priority. Where are the black fathers, and where are all those who should be calling them to their duty?
50_Cent  African_Canadians  dysfunction  family  silence  JCA  editorials  Toronto  fatherhood  killings  thug_code  family_breakdown  statistics  role_models  Jamaican  violence  say_"no"  Fifty-Cent  parenting 
november 2011 by jerryking
Advertising's Brave New World - WSJ.com
MAY 25, 2007 | WSJ | By EMILY STEEL

Advertising's Brave New World. Different Lineup of Players Emerges With Online's Rise

"The biggest innovation in the advertising industry during the last 70 years before digital was color TV," says Ajaz Ahmed, chairman and co-founder of independent digital marketing agency AKQA. "The agency of the future will be half a software company and half an entertainment company because that's the new landscape."
advertising  statistics  Google  Microsoft  Publicis  DoubleClick  online_advertising 
october 2011 by jerryking
The Really Smart Phone - WSJ.com
APRIL 23, 2011 | WSJ | By ROBERT LEE HOTZ.

The Really Smart Phone
Researchers are harvesting a wealth of intimate detail from our cellphone data, uncovering the hidden patterns of our social lives, travels, risk of disease—even our political views.

"We have turned society into a laboratory where behavior can be objectively followed."
mobile  privacy  research  statistics  technology  patterns  data  smartphones  mobile_phones  MIT  online_behaviour  behavioural_targeting 
october 2011 by jerryking
Country Brief GUYANA
Country Brief
GUYANA
July 1, 2010
Guyana  statistics 
august 2011 by jerryking
Toronto website gives deep look at neighbourhood statistics - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH CHURCH
, Jun. 29, 2011
Want to know what neighbourhood has the highest graduation rates, the
most trees or the greatest number of car accidents?

The answers are now a click away with a new hub on the city website.
Wellbeing Toronto lets users map an array of services and demographic
information and compare the results across 140 neighbourhoods. Users can
see basic information about a neighbourhood, such as average family
income, education level and age of population by sliding their cursor
over an interactive city map. They also can delve deeper to plot
services such as daycare centres, transit stops, and even convenience
stores and supermarkets in a specific area and see how they stack up
with other parts of the city.
Toronto  websites  community  statistics  neighbourhoods  demographic_information  Elizabeth_Church  municipalities  mapping  open_data  crowdsourcing 
july 2011 by jerryking
Reinventing business research | timetric.com
Great research deserves to be presented well

If you're in the business of publishing research — whether you're making
it available for free to as wide an audience as possible, selling
subscriptions, or selling reports and datasets on a one-off basis —
Timetric can help you do it faster, cheaper and more effectively.

Faster: Timetric's library of public data, gallery of visualizations
and API let you get going right away.

Cheaper: Timetric's software-as-a-service; that means low (often
zero) setup cost and very competitive ongoing pricing. We're so
confident that Timetric will make you more effective that we're happy to
work on a revenue-share basis.

More effectively: There's a reason we're one of the ten best places
to see 'sexy' data online; not only do services built on Timetric look
(and work) great, because the graphs are sharable and social they get
into the media, bringing you more (and more engaged) readers.
DaaS  visualization  infographics  statistics  data  tools  charts  analytics  web  analysis  Freshbooks  value_propositions  JCK 
july 2011 by jerryking
The Freelance Economy
11.16.09 | Forbes.com - Magazine Article | Keren Blankfeld,
Steinberg works 30 to 40 hours a week. But along with millions of other
contractors, she may not show up on the radar of the U.S. Bureau of
Labor Statistics, which compiles unemployment statistics by surveying
households and counting pay stubs. No one knows how many freelancers,
part-timers and consultants there are--the Government Accountability
Office took a stab in 2006, guesstimating that the group made up 30% of
all workers--much less how many escape the notice of the BLS. "It's
difficult to track, and is often misclassified or not accounted for by
the Department of Labor," says Sarah Horowitz, director of the
Freelancers Union in Brooklyn, N.Y. One thing is certain: The shape of
the so-called informal economy is changing.
freelancing  economy  statistics  GAO  BLS  informal_economy  Freshbooks  gig_economy 
june 2011 by jerryking
The Billion Prices Project and the Value of Data
May 30, 2011. | : The New Yorker | by James Surowiecki. A new
venture called the Billion Prices Project may help change that. The
B.P.P., which was designed by the M.I.T. economists Alberto Cavallo and
Roberto Rigobon, gathers price data not via survey but, rather, by
continuously scouring the Web for prices of online goods around the
world. (In the U.S., it collects more than half a million prices
daily—five times the number that the government looks at.) Using this
information, Cavallo and Rigobon have succeeded in building what amounts
to the first real-time inflation index. The B.P.P. tells us what’s
happening now, not what was happening a month ago.

Read more
http://www.newyorker.com/talk/financial/2011/05/30/110530ta_talk_surowiecki#ixzz1NAObusGP
James_Surowiecki  data  economy  economics  inflation  CPI  statistics  MIT  pricing  digital_economy  massive_data_sets 
may 2011 by jerryking
In a Data-Heavy Society, Being Defined by the Numbers - NYTimes.com
By ALINA TUGEND
Published: April 22, 2011
“Numbers make intangibles tangible,” said Jonah Lehrer, a journalist and
author of “How We Decide,” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009). “They
give the illusion of control.”[stories, anecdotes, and ratios make numbers memorable. See also Pinboard article, "To Persuade People, Tell Them a Story"]

Too many people shopping for cars, for example, get fixated on how much
horsepower the engine has, even though in most cases it really doesn’t
matter, Mr. Lehrer said.

“We want to quantify everything,” he went on, “to ground a decision in
fact, instead of asking whether that variable matters.” [jck: that is, which variables are incisive, worth paying attention to, act as signal in a sea of noise?]
obsessions  rankings  data_driven  metrics  statistics  analysis  incisiveness  quantitative  Jonah_Lehrer  dangers  intangibles  meaning  sense-making  data  illusions  false_confidence  anecdotal  books  sense_of_control  storytelling  decision_making  overquantification 
april 2011 by jerryking
The Hidden Job Crisis for American Men -
April 7, 2011 BusinessWeek By Peter Coy. Men are
disappearing from the workplace in ways that don't always register on
the official unemployment rate
unemployment  labour  race  Freshbooks  workforce_planning  statistics  crisis  hidden  joblessness 
april 2011 by jerryking
Slipstream: When the Data Struts Its Stuff | Forex Mentor
April 2, 2011

They are computer scientists, statisticians, graphic designers,
producers and cartographers who map entire oceans of data and turn them
into innovative visual displays, like rich graphs and charts, that help
both companies and consumers cut through the clutter. These gurus of
visual analytics are making interactive data synonymous with attractive
data.

“Statistics,” says Dr. Hans Rosling, “is now the sexiest subject
around.” ...the goal of information visualization is not simply to
represent millions of bits of data as illustrations. It is to prompt
visceral comprehension, moments of insight that make viewers want to
learn more....“The purpose of visualization,” says Ben Shneiderman,
founding director of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory at the
University of Maryland, “is insight, not pictures.”
Hans_Rosling  visualization  infographics  data  information_overload  statistics  Freshbooks  data_scientists  insights 
april 2011 by jerryking
What makes Canadians spend more time online? - The Globe and Mail
LES PERREAUX
MONTREAL— From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Dec. 28, 2010
Hard copy provides amazing charts.
Canadian  internet  statistics  digital_economy 
march 2011 by jerryking
A Bayesian Take on Julian Assange - NYTimes.com
December 15, 2010, 12:55 am
A Bayesian Take on Julian Assange
By NATE SILVER
Psychologists and behavioral economists have conducted a lot of
experiments along these lines, testing our ability to think through
problems that involve what statisticians call Bayesian inference: those
that require to us to infer the likelihood of various possibilities
based on a combination of prior, underlying conditions (we are in Japan:
most people we encounter here will be of Japanese ancestry) and new
information (but based on this woman’s appearance, it is hard to tell
whether she is Caucasian or Japanese!) They’ve found that, in general,
we do pretty badly with them: we tend to get lost in the most immediate
details and we forget the underlying context.
Julian_Assange  WikiLeaks  statistics  psychologists  economists  behavioural_economics  probabilities 
december 2010 by jerryking
Pity the high cost of being a Canadian millionaire
February 11, 2005 | Globe & Mail Pg. B13 | ANDREW WILLIS.
Here's the good news: The ranks of Canadian millionaires are swelling.
Unfortunately, the rising cost of being rich is taking a lot of the fun
out of it. Survey this country from coast to coast, as consulting firm
Capgemini just did, and you'll find Canada is home to 450,000 folks with
more than a million bucks of invested assets. The $5-million club has
just over 54,000 members and the seriously wealthy, with more than
$20-million, number about 7,000. Most of these millionaires are
grey-haired -- 72 % are over the age of 50....Aging boomers are an
enormous opportunity for wealth management companies...In 10 years time,
Capgemini estimates the number of millionaires in Canada will soar
20-fold, to more than eight million people. This will take place in step
with an unprecedented intergenerational transfer of wealth, as 32 % of
our millionaires are over age 70..
Andrew_Willis  high_net_worth  statistics  surveys  Canadian  income_distribution  generational_wealth  high-cost  wealth_management  wealth_transfers 
october 2010 by jerryking
Google to map inflation using web data
October 11 2010 | Financial Times | By Robin Harding in
Denver. Google is using its vast database of web shopping data to
construct the ‘Google Price Index’ – a daily measure of inflation that
could one day provide an alternative to official statistics
The work by Google’s chief economist, Hal Varian, highlights how
economic data can be gathered far more rapidly using online sources. The
official Consumer Price Index data are collected by hand from shops,
and only published monthly with a time lag of several weeks.
Hal_Varian  Google  inflation  statistics  mapping  massive_data_sets  economic_data  CPI 
october 2010 by jerryking
For Today’s Graduate, Just One Word - Statistics - NYTimes.com
Aug. 5, 2009 | NYT | By STEVE LOHR. “We’re entering a world
where everything can be monitored and measured,” said Erik Brynjolfsson,
an economist and director of MIT’s Center for Digital Business. “But
the big problem is the ability of man to use, analyze and make sense of
the data.”" The rich lode of Web data has its perils. Its sheer vol. can
easily overwhelm statistical models. Statisticians caution that strong
correlations of data do not necessarily prove a cause-and-effect link.
E.g., in the late 1940s, before there was a polio vaccine, public health
experts noted that polio cases increased in step with the consumption
of ice cream and soft drinks, says David A. Grier, a historian and
statistician at GWU. Eliminating such treats was recommended as part of
an anti-polio diet. It turned out that polio outbreaks were most common
in the hot mths of summer, when people ate more ice cream, showing only
an association. The data explosion magnifies longstanding issues in
statistics.
Steve_Lohr  Hal_Varian  statistics  career_paths  haystacks  analytics  Google  data  Freshbooks  information_overload  data_scientists  Erik_Brynjolfsson  measurements  sense-making  massive_data_sets  correlations  causality 
june 2010 by jerryking
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