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"The jobs at the end of the universe."
3 May 2012 |Financial Times |by Douglas Board.

Messrs Brynjolfsson and McAfee suggest that no matter how fast and smart computers become, 6 skills: statistical insight; managing group dynamics; good writing; framing and solving open-ended problems; persuasion; and human nurturing; will always be in demand....three more common quantitative abilities to be valued at senior levels: making the meaning of numbers come alive either visually or in words; a keen sense for when numbers should be an important part of a story yet are missing; and not being bullied by impressive correlations into assuming causality.
21st._century  Andrew_McAfee  career_paths  Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  data_journalism  Erik_Brynjolfsson  indispensable  insights  jobs  Managing_Your_Career  MIT  new_graduates  numeracy  open-ended  problem_solving  persuasion  sense-making  skills  statistics  storytelling  uncharted_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
A First Draft of History? - WSJ.com
March 12, 2005 | WSJ | By BRET STEPHENS

The cliché is that journalism is the first draft of history. Yet a historian searching for clues about the origins of many of the great stories of recent decades--the collapse of the Soviet empire; the rise of Osama bin Laden; the declining American crime rate; the economic eclipse of Japan and Germany--would find most contemporary journalism useless. Perhaps a story here or there might, in retrospect, seem illuminating. But chances are it would have been nearly invisible at the time of publication: eight column inches, page A12.

The problem is not that journalists can't get their facts straight: They can and usually do. Nor is it that the facts are obscure: Often, the most essential facts are also the most obvious ones. The problem is that journalists have a difficult time distinguishing significant facts--facts with consequences--from insignificant ones. That, in turn, comes from not thinking very hard about just which stories are most worth telling....As for the media, it shouldn't be too difficult to do better. Look for the countervailing data. Broaden your list of sources. Beware of exoticizing your subject:
Bret_Stephens  journalism  journalists  critical_thinking  history  signals  noise  frictions  pain_points  worthiness  countervailing  storytelling  seminal_moments  wide-framing  discernment  origin_story  historians  consequential  clichés  worthwhile_problems 
may 2012 by jerryking
What's Your Story?
January 2005 | HBR | by Herminia Ibarra and Kent Lineback.

Ibarra and Lineback say that few people use storytelling to help them pursue their professional goals, and those who do, do so ineffectively. Tales of transition can easily have the elements of a good drama—a protagonist the listeners cares about, a catalyst inducing action, trials and tribulations, a turning point, and a resolution—but they also bring special challenges. One problem comes from minimizing the discontinuities involved, thereby making the person appear safe, dull, and unremarkable. This is a response to fearing that listeners, hearing about our change of direction, will doubt our commitment to the new professional goal.
HBR  storytelling  Herminia_Ibarra  Communicating_&_Connecting  protagonists  persuasion  discontinuities  narratives  transitions  turning_points 
april 2012 by jerryking
In Africa, the Art of Listening - NYTimes.com
By HENNING MANKELL
Published: December 10, 2011

It struck me as I listened to those two men that a truer nomination for our species than Homo sapiens might be Homo narrans, the storytelling person. What differentiates us from animals is the fact that we can listen to other people’s dreams, fears, joys, sorrows, desires and defeats — and they in turn can listen to ours.

Many people make the mistake of confusing information with knowledge. They are not the same thing. Knowledge involves the interpretation of information. Knowledge involves listening.

So if I am right that we are storytelling creatures, and as long as we permit ourselves to be quiet for a while now and then, the eternal narrative will continue.
storytelling  listening  Africa  interpretation  Communicating_&_Connecting 
december 2011 by jerryking
Market Research: Safety Not Always in Numbers | Qualtrics
Author: Qualtrics|July 28, 2010

Albert Einstein once said, “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.”

Although many market research experts would say that quantitative research is the safest bet when one has limited resources, it can be dangerous to assume that it is always the best option.

we put together a few guidelines for when one research method might be more useful than the other.

Quantitative:
* For trending purposes, i.e. trends in customer feedback
* Need for quick feedback
* Particularly useful when a company wants to determine how to increase market share
* Product feedback for consumer products

Qualitative:
* Help identify non-obvious ways to delight current customers
* Looking for information to grow an existing market or create a new one
* Market research follow-up questions when numeric scales can be misleading
* Messaging validation for products that are new to the market
* Market validation
* Understanding objections and barriers
* Product feedback for enterprise products

In the article, “Market Research: Quantitative or Qualitative,” the writer Diane Hagglund said, “sometimes numbers provide false confidence and obscure real opportunity.” [Definition of overquantification]

She later added in a follow-up article that her market research firm recommends web surveys as good vehicles for quantifying concepts that the researcher is familiar with and wants accurate percentages for each option.

“This is a valuable thing to do, especially for market sizing, external marketing and PR purpose,” Hagglund said. “But for finding out the answers that you don’t really know, start with qualitative research – and by all means do a web survey next to put those percentages in place once you know the statements to put the percentages with.”

In other words, it’s important to quantify your qualitative research and qualify your quantitative research
market_research  market_sizing  overquantification  storytelling  qualitative  quantitative  Scott_Anthony  dangers  research_methods  non-obvious  enterprise_clients  false_confidence  Albert_Einstein  easy-to-measure  delighting_customers  follow-up_questions 
december 2011 by jerryking
The Real Job Creators: Why America should glorify entrepreneurs less and managers more. - Slate Magazine
By Esther Dyson|Posted Friday, Nov. 18, 2011,

a man who arrives in a village with what he claims is a magic stone. Put the stone into a pot of water over a fire, he says, add a just few ingredients—some vegetables, some old ham bones, a few spices—and soon you will have a delicious, life-giving soup with magical healing properties.

In this folk tale, the man is a trickster: The point of the story is that his magic stone is just a plain old rock. To modern eyes, however, this man is an entrepreneur. His “magic stone” is perhaps the germ of an idea, a product concept, or a marketing innovation. The entrepreneur takes the stone and adds ingredients (commodities or software), attracts people, gets them to work together, and perhaps tosses in a pinch of branding. The result is value where before there were only unexploited resources.

But that is only the beginning of the story. In the long run, the entrepreneur’s job is not to make soup, but to create a restaurant—or, better yet, a chain of restaurants—so that the magic soup can be made reliably, day after day, by a team that can work on its own without the impresario’s direction. Over time, the company will continue to evolve, improving the soup, adding other items to the menu and opening up restaurants in new markets....We can argue about the value of education, but large companies are good at offering practical business skills—turning college graduates into project managers, marketers, human-resources specialists, and the like. These jobs may not generate revenues directly, but they are part of the structure that enables people to run companies effectively and benefit from economies of scale.
college-educated  economies_of_scale  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  e-Myth  Esther_Dyson  impresarios  job_creation  large_companies  management  storytelling  unexploited_resources  value_creation 
november 2011 by jerryking
Teaching Young Women to Brag
May 9,2007| WALL STREET Journal|Victoria E. Knight

Reference [Victoria E. Knight, Teaching Young Woman to Brag, WALL ST.J., May 9,2007, at B3 ]

In turn, women of Wall Street are joining groups like High Water Women out of a desire to go beyond checkbook philanthropy....Ms. Klaus explains the importance of framing accomplishments in an engaging way. This means telling a story that highlights accomplishments, passions and interests without descending into a boring laundry list of achievements blighted by overuse of the word Ì`.
advice  mentoring  disadvantages  leadership  women  networking  self-promotion  New_York_City  public_speaking  leadership_development  finance  Wall_Street  philanthropy  storytelling  coaching  praise  daughters  girls 
november 2011 by jerryking
How to Ensure Your Startup Is a Success — No Matter What Happens
August 29, 2011 | | BNET | By Penelope Trunk |
Always frame what you do as good for you. For the most part, what
happens to your company is probably what is best for your company at
that point — the market is not stupid, and sometimes it’s hard to see
the value of what you’re doing when you’re doing it.

The skill here is to get good at framing your own experience. This is
not lying. This is admitting that there are 10 versions of every story,
and you need to tell the version of your own story that will help you
get what you want next.
start_ups  storytelling  Communicating_&_Connecting 
august 2011 by jerryking
Men like dogs: Technology is allowing us to act more like our canine friends
May 6, 2011 | The Economist |by Schumpeter.

David Crow presentation from a few years ago on smart glasses--augmented reality.

Dogs, they say,
think in maps informed with their smell. They sniff &re-sniff a
location to find out what has been there & they sniff the air to
tell the future: to discover what will be here or where they'll go next.
Thus, dogs have a different sense of 'now'. Unlike our eyes, which take
in what is visible & apparent at this moment, their noses can sense
the past — who & what was here & what’s decaying underneath —
& the future of a place — what’s coming, just upwind. Dogs are
microprocessors & their noses feed their data bases. It strikes me
that the web— particularly the mobile web— is building a dog’s map of
the world. Via Foursquare, Facebook, Google, Twitter, Maps, Layar,
Goggles, etc.,we can look at a place & see who & what was here
before, what happened here, what people think of this place.Every place
will tell a story it could not before, without a nose to find the data
about it and a data base to store it and a mind to process it.
dogs  technology  Foursquare  Twitter  location  overlay_networks  location_based_services  smell  mapping  augmented_reality  metaphysical  sense-making  storytelling  wayfinding 
may 2011 by jerryking
In a Data-Heavy Society, Being Defined by the Numbers - NYTimes.com
By ALINA TUGEND
Published: April 22, 2011
“Numbers make intangibles tangible,” said Jonah Lehrer, a journalist and
author of “How We Decide,” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009). “They
give the illusion of control.”[stories, anecdotes, and ratios make numbers memorable. See also Pinboard article, "To Persuade People, Tell Them a Story"]

Too many people shopping for cars, for example, get fixated on how much
horsepower the engine has, even though in most cases it really doesn’t
matter, Mr. Lehrer said.

“We want to quantify everything,” he went on, “to ground a decision in
fact, instead of asking whether that variable matters.” [jck: that is, which variables are incisive, worth paying attention to, act as signal in a sea of noise?]
obsessions  rankings  data_driven  metrics  statistics  analysis  incisiveness  quantitative  Jonah_Lehrer  dangers  intangibles  meaning  sense-making  data  illusions  false_confidence  anecdotal  books  sense_of_control  storytelling  decision_making  overquantification 
april 2011 by jerryking
The 18-minute presentation - The Globe and Mail
JIM GRAY
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 11, 2011
storytelling  presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting 
march 2011 by jerryking
Method not as important as the message
February 28, 2011 | globeadvisor.com | VIRGINIA GALT
Tweets and status updates offer a real connect with customers, as long
as you know your audience. "When you talk about what you need to grab
media attention, you need to have a really great story, you need to have
a story that engages people on an emotional level," said Geoff Rowan,
partner and managing director of Ketchum Public Relations Canada. The
communications method - whether it's old media or new media - doesn't
matter nearly as much as the message.
small_business  marketing  social_media  coffee  public_relations  Virginia_Galt  storytelling  know_your_audience 
march 2011 by jerryking
Stanford's Entrepreneurship Corner: Jack Dorsey, Square - The Power of Curiosity and Inspiration
Lecture by Jack Dorsey, creator of twitter and square, as part
of Stanford U.'s Entrepreneurship corner.
"Instrument" your company from Day 1. The 1st thing he did in square
(and not in twitter) is write an admin control panel for their servers.
Be a story teller. Inspire your team & your customers with a
story, your idea.
In the company, act as the editor, composing the stories.
The team you build is not permanent, different players will need to
enter & exit according to their profiles, the current story &
the "required edition".
Internal comms.: Everyone in the company will have the same
priorities.
External comms: You communicate with the product, your product is
"your story for your customers".
$ in the bank: The company needs it, firstly from investors and
secondly, and more critical, from revenue.
Limit the # of details. Those that stay need to be perfect.
Finally,"expect the unexpected and, whenever possible, be the
unexpected".
Stanford  entrepreneurship  Jack_Dorsey  start_ups  turning_your_team  Twitter  lessons_learned  entrepreneur  Square  control_systems  storytelling  dashboards  unexpected  instrumentation_monitoring  curiosity  inquisitiveness 
february 2011 by jerryking
Monday morning manager
Apr 3, 2006 | G&M.pg. B.2 | Harvey Schachter. Most
presentations & product demos start with a corporate overview of the
company doing the selling. Instead, save the corporate overview for the
end and start with a powerful slide that captures the needs of the
buyer. ... Financing: How to raise capital from angel investors.
Raising money from angels requires a shrewd understanding of their
wallets, inner needs, and spouse, according to venture capitalist Guy
Kawasaki.On his blog, he advises you to:Make sure they are rich enough
to never get a penny back, and also sophisticated investors, who can
give you advice.Understand their motivations, whether it's purely
monetary or includes paying back society by helping other entrepreneurs.
Enable them to live vicariously through your efforts, reliving the
thrills of entrepreneurship while avoiding the firing line. Seek their
advice, routinely.Make your story comprehensible to their spouse, who
will have a say if not a veto in the investment.
Beatles  teams  presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting  storytelling  howto  angels  funding  Harvey_Schachter  guy_kawasaki  ProQuest 
december 2010 by jerryking
Better communication crucial -- but tough
Nov 5, 2004 |The Globe & Mail pg. C.3 | Rick Spence.
Peter Drucker, the ageless management guru, once declared that 60 % of
all management problems result from faulty communication...Mr. Drucker's
message is clear: Effective communication is crucial to business -- and
it's harder than it looks. Spence has developed some rules of thumb to
help people become better communicators. (1) Identify your target
audience; (2) Introduce yourself, and your message, properly; (3) Be
yourself (4) Use the word 'you'; (5) Tell stories; (6) Be creative;
(7) Encourage feedback.
ProQuest  Rick_Spence  Communicating_&_Connecting  feedback  Peter_Drucker  rules_of_the_game  storytelling  authenticity 
october 2010 by jerryking
What is Scarce in Advocacy and Campaigns?
August 28, 2007 | NetCentric Advocacy | Ways for Campaigns
to be unique and offer something scarce... (things you have that others
don't in a mass marketing world)...

1. Real stories.
2. Genuine passion.
3. A base of real people that care about the issue.
4. Staff that have insights on the science, politics, policies and
dynamics at play that keep an issue form being solved.
5. The ability to convene people that care.
6. Clarity and purpose in a world of shallow consumerism
7. No need to make money while solving a problem ( can do things that
solve problems and loose money by design)
8. you have fun working on an issue most people would burn out on.
9. maybe truth and science to support your claims.
10. faith and confidence in your work.
advocacy  authenticity  campaigns  cause_marketing  passions  public_relations  scarcity  storytelling 
october 2010 by jerryking
The Digital Future: You Know It When You See It
August 5, 2010,| BusinessWeek |By Paul M. Barrett. The future
of media is still about storytelling—just not the kind you think. I
Live in the Future & Here's How It Works:
Why Your World, Work, and Brain Are Being Creatively Disrupted
By Nick Bilton
Crown Business, 304 pp, $25
storytelling  digital_media  book_reviews  pornography 
august 2010 by jerryking
Investors want you to tell a better story
Jun 1, 2010 | Financial Times pg. 14 | Stefan Stern. Companies
find this basic task [ of communicating to their investors ] hard to do.
Drowning in technical measurements - total shareholder returns, EPS,
EVA, EBITDA - they fail to answer the much more important and basic
questions: why do you exist? What are you trying to do? Would you buy
shares in a company that couldn't answer these questions simply, in
plain English? No wonder some investors lose faith in corporate
leadership teams. This is why some observers are arguing that company
chairmen need to take their leadership role more seriously, to
(re)discover the art of storytelling, and make sure their voice is heard
in explaining what their company is in business to do. The task is to
"communicate the character of your company". Stop hiding behind massaged
figures and intricate PowerPoint slides. Tell us a story about your
business that people can believe in.
investors  investor_relations  storytelling  Stefan_Stern  ProQuest  boards_&_directors_&_governance 
june 2010 by jerryking
Evangelist in sheep's clothing
Jun 2, 2010 | FT | by Anna Fifield.

Ideas for JCK

Do
* Hold onto your brand's core msg. "Having a strong identity from the
beginning helps shape the org. as it evolves."
* Use retail to create a deeper customer connection "There's nothing
like being able to tell your full story in 3 dimensions."
* Hire a specialist team of retail advisers when opening in new mkts
"We've been successful over the yrs. because when we do something new,
we find people who can teach us."
* Connect with the local community to create local advocates "It's all
about repeat business & people talking to people."

Don't
* See wholesale and retail as substitutes - they should be complementary
"If we take the eye off our wholesale business then our cash cow dries
up & we can no longer fund our retail expansion."
* Be afraid to be anti-fashion "We're about longevity, not [about being]
disposable."
* Forget that great brands grow through word of mouth "Our most
important question is: 'Would U recommend Icebreaker to others?'"
brand_identity  ProQuest  New_Zealand  entrepreneur  clothing  international_marketing  lifestyles  branding  outdoors  apparel  storytelling  Communicating_&_Connecting  WoM  longevity  3-D  customer_intimacy  think_threes  retailers  wholesalers  cash_cows  disposability  brands 
june 2010 by jerryking
George Lucas Wants More “Greek Philosophers and Cobblers” — World Business Forum — Presented by Shell
George Lucas divides the forms of learning into two parts that
are equally important in shaping how people think and act. The first
part is “the philosophical-intellectual side,” in the
Aristotle/Plato/Socratic mold. The second part is apprenticeship
mold....“Once we got into the Industrial Revolution, those two forms of
learning got swept aside and education became an exercise in pumping as
much information as possible into kids,”... like an assembly line, and
at the end of the assembly line, the students spit back the information
and get a diploma. That doesn’t work.” Through the George Lucas
Educational Foundation, he’s applying his storytelling and technical
prowess to engage students and turn out sharper thinkers who can thrive
in an age of information overload.
storytelling  George_Lucas  Greek  apprenticeships  students  Industrial_Revolution  Socratic  critical_thinking  foundations  philanthropy  philosophers  Plato 
may 2010 by jerryking
Opening Sentences That Close the Sale
October 25, 2006 | High Ranksings | by Karon Thackston, Marketing Words, Inc.
storytelling  Communicating_&_Connecting  writing 
april 2010 by jerryking
How America's Top Military Officer Uses Business to Boost National Security
May 1, 2010 | Fast Company | Jeff Chu. "He wanted to know what
kind of environment can be created in which business can thrive and
what role govts. have to play," "What is it that makes businesses
successful?" What does this have to do with his job or the military's?
"Our financial health is directly related to our national security,"
"The biggest driver globally is the economy ... I need to understand the
global trends that work those engines. Where are these guys putting
their $? If they're betting on certain outcomes -- good or bad -- why?"
Mullen's principles on the use of US military force: don't go it alone;
don't be overweight in foreign policy; closer coordination between
military and civilian agencies. "If his advice were only how to fight
hi-tech wars, and if his solution were just to apply more force, he
would be less relevant," Brent Scowcroft, "He recognizes that the new
face of war is a very complex...part combat, part nation building, and
part hearts and minds."
leadership  U.S._military  JCS  Michael_Mullen  nation_building  ethnography  geopolitics  21st._century  indispensable  storytelling  messaging  generalship  security_&_intelligence  Brent_Scowcroft  strategic_thinking  questions  war  warfare  complexity  curiosity  APNSA 
april 2010 by jerryking
How to tell your story
Nov 2004 | Profit. Vol. 23, Iss. 5; pg. 6, 1 pgs | by Ian Portsmouth.
ProQuest  storytelling  howto  Rick_Spence  entrepreneur  media_coverage  magazines  public_relations 
march 2010 by jerryking
Show me;
Feb 27, 2010 | The Economist. Vol. 394, Iss. 8671; pg. 14 |
Anonymous. Displaying information can make a difference by enabling
people to understand complex matters and find creative solutions. In
recent years there have been big advances in displaying massive amounts
of data to make them easily accessible. This is emerging as a vibrant
and creative field melding the skills of computer science, statistics,
artistic design and storytelling. Today's infographics experts are
pioneering a new medium that presents meaty information in a compelling
narrative: "Something in-between the textbook and the novel", writes
Nathan Yau of UCLA in a recent book, "Beautiful Data". It's only natural
ProQuest  visualization  infographics  storytelling  Communicating_&_Connecting 
march 2010 by jerryking
Whatever the pitch, aim for the emotions
Apr. 09, 2009 | Globe and Mail Blog Post | by Harvey
Schachter. There are nine types of stories that arouse people's
interest, according to author and consultant Lois Kelly. On the How To
Change The World blog, she advises when pitching to others - be it in
customer advertising, proposals to investors, ideas to the media, or
appeals to employees or partners - you should tap into the strong
storylines that we are predisposed to enjoy:
pitches  presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting  emotional_connections  storytelling  proposals  advertising  Harvey_Schachter 
february 2010 by jerryking
FT.com / Management - The corporate memory-makers
January 11 2010 | Financial Times | By Alicia Clegg. From a
communications perspective, say enthusiasts, the combination of
technology and storytelling creates all kinds of possibilities for
businesses to bring their brands imaginatively to life as well as to
pass knowledge and skills from one generation of employees to the next.
Through the retelling of veterans’ memories, companies hope to build
stronger, more successful, cultures.
archives  business_archives  business_history  commemoration  corporate  heritage  historians  history  organizational_culture  storytelling 
january 2010 by jerryking
Crovitz: Technology Is Stranger Than Fiction - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 23, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by L. GORDON
CROVITZ who comments on "Makers," the latest by best-selling writer Cory
Doctorow. This novel is set in a not-too distant future, when the
creative destruction of technological change has created an economy so
efficient, with profit margins so thin, that traditional companies can
hardly stay in business. "The system makes it hard to sell anything
above the marginal cost of goods, unless you have a really innovative
idea, which can't stay innovative for long, so you need continuous
invention and reinvention, too." This theme captures current anxieties.
Technology lets low-cost providers take market share away from
established companies, as Detroit auto makers and Paris fashion house
designers have seen.
storytelling  book_reviews  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  Cory_Doctorow  creative_destruction  technological_change 
november 2009 by jerryking
All Writing Tells a Story :: YouPublish
Taken from the January 2005 HBR article titled, "What's Your Story?" by Herminia Ibarra and Kent Lineback. Key Elements of a Classic Story: # A protagonist the listener cares about. # A catalyst compelling the protagonist to take action.
# Trials and tribulations. # A turning point. # A resolution.///If you’re a professional in transition, learn to tell stories about your professional self, advise Herminia Ibarra and Kent Lineback. Explaining to others what’s going on when you’re in the midst of a major career change is risky and typically is done poorly. An effective narrative can boost others’ belief (as well as your own) in your character and ability to move onto something new; it gives meaning to the dry facts of your career history; and it will preserve the value of the past even as you embrace the future.
Communicating_&_Connecting  Herminia_Ibarra  job_search  Managing_Your_Career  narratives  protagonists  storytelling  turning_points 
november 2009 by jerryking
A whole new mind: why right-brainers ... - Google Books
Excerpt from 'A whole new mind: why right-brainers will rule
the future' By Daniel H. Pink. "Indeed, one of design's most potent
economic effects is this very capacity to create new markets... The
forces of Abundance, Asia, and Automation turn goods and services into
commodities so quickly that the only way to survive is by constantly
developing new innovations, inventing new categories, and (in Paola
Antonelli's lovely phrase) giving the world something it didn't know it
was missing.
============================================

See also Tom Friedman's piece ("We Need a Second Party" - NYTimes.com ) below:

The first is responding to the challenges and opportunities of an era in which globalization and the information technology revolution have dramatically intensified, creating a hyperconnected world. This is a world in which education, innovation and talent will be rewarded more than ever. This is a world in which there will be no more “developed” and “developing countries,” but only HIEs (high-imagination-enabling countries) and LIEs (low-imagination-enabling countries). Adding "imagination"
design  Daniel_Pink  innovation  storytelling  symphony  empathy  play  meaning  sense-making  new_businesses  new_categories  automation  abundance  Asia  developing_countries  imagination  Tom_Friedman  high-touch  special_sauce  skills  developed_countries 
october 2009 by jerryking
The Gripping Statistic : How to Make Your Data Matter
Mon Aug 10, 2009 | Fast Company | By Dan Heath & Chip
Heath. A good statistic is one that aids a decision or shapes an opinion. For a stat to do either of those, it must be dragged within the everyday (e.g. using ratios or useful analogies). That's your job -- to do the dragging. In our world of billions and trillions, that can be a lot of manual labor. But it's worth it: A number people can grasp is a number that can make a difference.
analogies  base_rates  Cisco  Communicating_&_Connecting  contextual  data  data_journalism  high-impact  mathematics  narratives  numeracy  persuasion  probabilities  ratios  statistics  storytelling  sense-making  value_creation 
september 2009 by jerryking
How to sell innovation services?
23 August 2005 | CPH127 | by Magnus Christensson.It is through
looking at the patterns in customers’ stories that we can
provide our clients with a startlingly different and enormously useful
picture of the market and its direction — the most valuable input into
an innovation strategy that anyone can offer. If this (customer
research, future scenario) is our point of entry (and we deliver) we
might be able to overcome the first three issues and get the trust
needed to engage in further collaboration.
innovation  selling  marketing  howto  pattern_recognition  JCK  insights  customer_insights  storytelling 
june 2009 by jerryking
Chicago Reader Blogs: The Sports Page
"The Wall Street Journal doesn't just follow sports. We lead
the way. Sure you might call our sports coverage analytical, insightful
or even forward thinking, but one thing you can't call it is
conventional. When we report on sports, we focus less on what you've
already seen happen and more on what will happen next. We look behind
the scenes. At the big picture. We tell stories you don't expect from a
perspective as unusual as it is engaging. And we show you the shape of
things to come. It's a whole new take on sports. It's sports in the Wall
Street Journal. And it's 5 days a week. Sports coverage has gone pro."
next_play  WSJ  sports  unconventional_thinking  sportscasting  forward_looking  storytelling  interpretative  aftermath  the_big_picture 
june 2009 by jerryking
To fix the economy, tell the right stories
May 14, 2009 | Globe and Mail | by ROBERT SHILLER

World confidence can return if the population's thinking co-ordinates
around some inspiring story beyond that of the price increases
themselves. In Shiller's book with George Akerlof, Animal Spirits, they
describe the ups and downs of a macroeconomy as being substantially
driven by stories. Such narratives, especially those fuelled by
accessible human-interest stories, are the thought viruses whose
contagion drives the economy. The contagion rate of stories depends on
their relation to feedback, but plausible stories have to be there in
the first place. The narratives have substantial persistence in that
they affect our views.
storytelling  economic_downturn  ideas  Communicating_&_Connecting  jck  Robert_Shiller  economics  confidence  macroeconomics  inspiration  ideaviruses  contagions  narratives  economic_dynamism  leaps_of_faith 
may 2009 by jerryking
Top entrepreneurs talk about how to keep your customers, and find opportunities, in tough economic times
MAY 11, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | 5-person panel discussion
moderated by Gwendolyn Bounds. Wendy questions the group of
entrepreneurs under the theme "What’s the secret of being an
entrepreneur in these hard economic times?"....trying to stand out from the crowd. I think the best one we did, which we launched when it was about six degrees outside, was a marketing campaign that says, what this town could really use right now is a good bowl of chicken soup.

Chicken soup is one of the great comfort foods in every single culture, and we think that we need to be selling comfort right now. And chicken soup also is a way to define the restaurant. .....people are always looking for joy. They’re always looking to be connected. They’re always looking to feel generous. So Danny’s insight, which is so brilliant, is for the cost of a bowl of chicken soup, you get to feel generous. You get to feel connected. You get to feel part of the community. That story is easy to tell because we all have a memory of chicken soup growing up.......Marketing is not this blank check that lets you sell whatever you want. The challenge that we’re facing, as we enter this serious recession, is not how do we stop doing everything. It’s how do we create experiences and stories, interactions, that don’t necessarily cost a lot of money, but create value for everyone concerned.......I think that for an entrepreneur who is interested and passionate about creating something in the technology space, whether it’s a device or a service or a platform, this is an extraordinary time, because there’s an enormous lull in the Fortune 1000 with respect to innovation and new ideation. ........on the equity side, where they don’t have these types of opportunities, we look for innovative companies that actually create a disruption. The simple thing is, if you can offer the environment where we can lower your costs and improve quality, it’s a no-brainer.

But in general, we have to make certain that these entrepreneurs really know the industry, they know the customers, they know the competition and most importantly, they know thyself, they know what they can and cannot do.

So it’s interesting when you play across the capital structure, how you bifurcate this, and I think it all has to do with innovation and creating something that doesn’t exist, that fits a pent-up need.
disruption  self-awareness  Gwendolyn_Bounds  Seth_Godin  Danny_Meyer  entrepreneur  economic_downturn  hard_times  attention  innovation  ideation  ideas  underwriting  geographic_ingredient_branding  Buy_American  craftsmanship  soups  marketing  storytelling  lingerie  intimate_apparel  idea_generation  emotional_connections  small_batch  generosity  joy 
may 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com: The value of value is the new consumer angle
March 16, 2009 | The Globe and Mail pg. B6| ANDREA SOUTHCOTT
* Understand your competitive context.
* Offer consumers new ways to experience your product.
* Tap into the power of local stories.
* Tap into the best-kept secrets of local community.
* Shift from owning to using.
consumers  value_propositions  competitive_landscape  value  Andrea_Southcott  sharing_economy  locavore  storytelling  economic_downturn  end_of_ownership 
march 2009 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: The difference between PR and publicity
Publicity is the act of getting ink. PR is the strategic
crafting of your story. It's the focused examination of your
interactions and tactics and products and pricing that, when combined,
determine what and how people talk about you.
Communicating_&_Connecting  advertising  public_relations  strategy  marketing  branding  Seth_Godin  publicity  storytelling 
march 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / Home UK / UK - A rummage in the corporate attic
July 24, 2008, Financial Times, pg. 10, article by Alicia
Clegg details how commemorative research can benefit a company
commercially with image and marketing. References Bruce Weindruch,
founder, of the History Factory, a consultancy offering "heritage
management services".
archives  branding  business_archives  commemoration  historians  history  heritage  organizational_culture  research  storytelling 
march 2009 by jerryking
Drama Queen
May 2008, Toronto Life profile of playwright, advice columnist
and now novelist Claudia Dey is her generation’s quirkiest storyteller.
By Gerald Hannon. Under the pseudonym Bebe O’Shea, she wrote a sex
advice column for the defunct men’s magazine Toro.
Toronto_Life  playwrights  Claudia_Dey  Toro  sex_advice  quirky  storytelling 
march 2009 by jerryking
The Medium - Photo Negative - Google Misses an Opportunity With Its Life Magazine Archive - NYTimes.com
February 27, 2009 NYT Magazine article VIRGINIA HEFFERNAN who
is mystified by Google’s recent decision to essentially dump its
priceless trove of photos from Life magazine — some 10 million images
from Life’s holdings, most of them never published — into an online
crate.
Google has failed to recognize that it can’t publish content under its
imprint without also creating content of some kind: smart, reported
captions; new and good-looking slide-show software; interstitial
material that connects disparate photos; robust thematic and topical
organization.
Google  photography  curation  content  Life_Magazine  storytelling  interstitial  overlay_networks  jazmin_isaacs  metadata  missed_opportunities  contextual  sorting  creating_valuable_content 
march 2009 by jerryking

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