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jerryking : strategic_patience   6

You must do these two difficult things to invest as patiently as the greats - The Globe and Mail
TOM BRADLEY
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017

Great investors have differences, but they share a number of key attributes.

They have an independent view. They feel no obligation to invest in something because others are doing it or because it’s a part of an index. Indeed, they prefer when a stock isn’t popular or heavily traded.

They buy when opportunities present themselves, not when the money is available. Cash doesn’t burn a hole in their pocket.

They buy assets that, in their reasoned opinion, will eventually be worth considerably more than they’re able to purchase them for. The key word being eventually. Their time frame is only slightly shorter than that.

They don’t get hung up on short-term events, although they do monitor them closely so they can take advantage of opportunities. Price movements and/or liquidity events may allow them to buy more or sell, and any new information can be used to update their valuation models.

You get the picture. Patient capital is focused on long-term value creation. It’s comfortable being out-of-sync with popular trends. And it doesn’t get distressed by market dislocations, it gets excited.

If working with a financial adviser, they have to understand and believe in the patient-capital approach. No prattling from them about quick stock or ETF flips. No recommendations of "hot" fund managers nor cold feet when short-term results are poor.

You want advisers and money managers who can live up to the traits listed above and, ideally, who are working in organizations that exemplify the same traits. You and your adviser have a better chance of being “patient capital” if the firm’s sales, marketing, product development and investment strategies are aligned.
Tom_Bradley  investors  long-term  strategic_patience  liquidity_events  personality_types/traits  dislocations  undervalued  opportunistic  unanimity  personal_finance  financial_advisors  contrarians  independent_viewpoints  financial_pornography  best_of 
january 2017 by jerryking
Jeff Bezos's Tool Kit for Washington Post - WSJ.com
August 6, 2013 | WSJ | By KEACH HAGEY and GREG BENSINGER

Jeff Bezos's Tool Kit for the Post
Amazon Founder Brings Skills in Data Gathering, Software, E-Commerce


Mr. Bezos bought the paper in a personal capacity, many media-industry experts expressed optimism that the Amazon.com Inc. AMZN -1.23% founder will be able to apply to the Post the same software development, data gathering and e-commerce chops—as well as his patient investment philosophy—that turned his company into a powerhouse.

"Building audience, personalizing the offering, and, certainly, monetization," those are the core competencies that Jeff Bezos and Amazon have developed,
newspapers  turnarounds  software  e-commerce  data  Jeff_Bezos  WaPo  strategic_patience  core_competencies 
august 2013 by jerryking
Nine key traits to make the shift from failure to success - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Tuesday, Oct. 09 2012

1. Rebounders accept failure: They hate to fail, but they accept it, and try to fail productively, learning from the experience, as the inventive Thomas Edison did with his many failed experiments.

2. Rebounders compartmentalize options: They are often emotional people, with drive and passion. John Bogle, who founded Vanguard Group, was furious when he was pushed out of a previous job and even had revenge fantasies. But he didn’t spend time trying to get even. Rebounders control the emotional fallout of their struggle (i.e. emotional mastery).

3. Rebounders have a bias toward action: After Tammy Duckworth lost both legs when her U.S. military helicopter was shot down in Iraq, her first impulse was to get to work at rehabilitation and her new life. Rebounders keep pushing, keep doing.

4. Rebounders change their minds: They can discard old thinking, give up on long-held dreams, and adjust their ambitions to evolving situations. They don’t cling to ideas that are proving hopeless.

5. Rebounders prepare for things to go wrong: They don’t expect things to go their own way. They are cautious optimists, always aware their plans may go awry.

6. Rebounders are comfortable with discomfort: They are willing to accept hardships and inconveniences as long as they feel they are getting closer to their goal. Singer/songwriter Lucinda Williams could have signed a major recording deal years earlier if she had agreed to make the songs the music companies wanted, but she stayed true to her own vision, even if it meant often barely having the money to pay her rent.

7. Rebounders are willing to wait: They are determined to succeed on their own terms, and can accept that it might take a long time. “But rebounders don’t just wait positively for a lucky break, or do the same thing over and over. They constantly learn and get better, continually improving the likelihood of success until the odds tilt in their favour,” Mr. Newman observes.

8. Rebounders have heroes: Many of the rebounders he met are romantics, seeing their role as in some way historic, and they are entranced by some mentor or historical figure who they want to emulate. Vanguard’s Mr. Bogle, for example, often alluded to the naval battles of Admiral Lord Nelson and named his mutual fund company after his hero’s ship.

9. Rebounders have more than passion: We are told we need passion for success, but rebounders realize it requires more than that. They have a special drive and resilience that allows them to capitalize on their passion.
bouncing_back  resilience  Harvey_Schachter  emotional_mastery  personality_types/traits  ksfs  long-term  patience  preparation  contingency_planning  reflections  self-analysis  self-awareness  thinking_tragically  discomforts  strategic_patience  adaptability  inconveniences  passions  heroes  pragmatism  compartmentalization  action-oriented  hardships  next_play 
october 2012 by jerryking
7 Easy Steps to Bootstrapping Success
Oct 1, 2010 | Inc. Magazine | By Andrew Park. In this economy,
you can pretty much forget about financing. And it's probably just as
well, says marketing guru Seth Godin, author of The Bootstrapper's
Bible. People often ask him for advice on raising venture capital for
their start-ups, and "nine times out of 10, I advise them they
shouldn't," he says. Instead, take these seven steps to self-funded
stardom. (1) GET CLOSE TO YOUR CUSTOMERS ; (2) MAKE CLIENTS PAY UP FRONT
;(3)FIND THE FREE LUNCH ;(4) FORGET STEALTH MODE ; (5)BECOME AN
EXPERT ; (6) ASK FOR HELP ; (7) BE PATIENT
Seth_Godin  bootstrapping  entrepreneurship  inspiration  start_ups  asking_for_help  funding  finance  tips  venture_capital  charge_for_something  stealth  expertise  patience  Pablo_Picasso  strategic_patience 
september 2010 by jerryking
Corner Office - Before Making a Splash, He Says, Leaders Learn to Swim - Question - NYTimes.com
Sept. 11, 2010 | New York Times | This interview with Richard
R. Buery Jr., president & CEO of the Children’s Aid Society, based
in NYC, was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant. ..."I think one of
the most important lessons I’ve learned is to avoid the tendency to want
to come in and make big decisions before you really know what you’re
talking about. So take the time to learn and to listen. And if that
means that you’re taking more time to make changes, that’s great because
you’re more likely to make good decisions. "
CEOs  philanthropy  charities  nonprofit  mentoring  leadership  Yale  strategic_patience 
september 2010 by jerryking

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