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jerryking : structural_change   25

Opinion | What Billionaires Don’t Understand About College Debt
Dec. 23, 2019 | - The New York Times | By Alissa Quart. Ms. Quart is the author of “Squeezed: Why Our Families Can’t Afford America.”
Anand_Giridharadas  benefactors  Colleges_&_Universities  high-impact  income_inequality  moguls  philanthropy  structural_change  tax-deductible  The_One_Percent 
january 2020 by jerryking
White men run 98% of finance. Can philanthropy bring change?
June 16, 2019 | Financial Times | by Rob Manilla.

Q: How do you achieve change at the decision making level in the finance industry when diversity moves at glacial pace?
asset_management  diversity  endowments  hedge_funds  finance  foundations  Kresge  meritocratic  philanthropy  private_equity  real_estate  results-driven  social_enginering  structural_change  under-representation  white_men  women 
june 2019 by jerryking
GE: industrial stalwart contemplates a general overhaul
OCTOBER 5, 2018 | Financial Times | by Ed Crooks in New York.

“GE Power is at death’s door,” says Scott Davis, an analyst at Melius Research. “It’s going to require a massive change in strategy to fix it.”

The Alstom deal is far from being GE’s only strategic mis-step. But it is emblematic of two of the company’s flaws: a weakness for dealmaking, and an inability to respond effectively to a changing market. Together, those failings go a long way to explaining why one of the greatest names in American business, an original member of the Dow Jones Industrial Average at its creation in 1896, has lost more than 80 per cent of its market capitalisation since 2000......while GE’s leaders were focused on a deal that might have been perfect 10 or 20 years ago, they were underestimating the scale of the changes hitting the electricity industry. As the costs of wind and solar power have plunged, they have become competitive against the gas-fired and coal-fired power plants that are GE and Alstom’s forte. It is a mistake that companies often make at times of structural change, says Kingsmill Bond of the Carbon Tracker Initiative: “They confused the current size of the market with the future growth of the market.”.....As the scale of the problem emerged, Mr Flannery moved to cut costs. Last December he announced 12,000 jobs would go from the power division. But reducing headcount is slow work in Europe, especially in France, where Mr Immelt had pledged to create a net 1,000 additional jobs by the end of 2018......The urgency of the crisis creates opportunities to make radical changes. A group of investors including hedge fund manager Sir Christopher Hohn of the Children’s Investment Fund on Friday published a letter to Mr Culp, urging him to scale back investment in gas and coal power and embrace clean energy.....Giving up on selling new turbines to concentrate on the more lucrative services business would be a momentous step, but Mr Davis says that like General Motors during the 2008 financial crisis, the business is in urgent need of a radical rethink.
Alstom  CEOs  change  cost-cutting  creating_opportunities  deal-making  DJIA  energy  exits  GE  Jack_Welch  Jeffrey_Immelt  John_Flannery  shifting_tastes  Siemens  structural_change 
october 2018 by jerryking
No Racial Barrier Left to Break (Except All of Them) - The New York Times
JAN. 14, 2017 | NYT | By KHALIL GIBRAN MUHAMMAD.

The future is no longer about “firsts.” It is instead about the content of the character of the institutions our new leaders will help us rebuild....The U.S. can’t create a more just nation simply by dressing up institutions in more shades of brown. Now there must be an effort to confront structural racism.....for African-Americans, Obama's travails are proof positive that MLK's contention that the content of one’s character would be the perfect antidote to racism is necessary but--by itself--insufficient to heal the gaping wounds of racial injustice in America.....in a post-assimilation America where there is no racial [occupational] barrier left to break, [African] Americans must turn to confronting structural racism and the values of our institutions....Obama's pedigree and character couldn’t protect/save him from the Tea Party revolution, Republican obstructionism, police brutality, voter suppression and Islamophobia.... individuals, no matter how singular, cannot bend the moral arc of the universe....In a post-assimilation America, recognize that institutions are far more powerful than individuals, no matter how many people of color can be counted in leadership. Structural racism is immune to identity politics....history matters. Black people in charge of, or embedded in, institutions that have not atoned for their history of racism can make it easier for those institutions to ignore or dismiss present-day claims of racial bias. That’s because the path to leadership has often meant accepting institutions as they are, not disrupting them.....people of color can inherit or perpetuate structures of inequality. Many institutions of government, finance and higher education were built on the backs of enslaved African-Americans and remain haunted by that history. Diversity and inclusion policies, therefore, should grow out of truth and reconciliation practices as well as strategic hiring plans. Intentional transformation, even reparations, one government agency, one company, one college at a time moves us past the denial and the empty promises....In post-assimilation America, people of color must continue to pursue leadership roles as the demographics of the nation inexorably change. But they must also reject their personal achievement as the core measure of progress and instead use history as a tool to measure systemic change.
African-Americans  assimilation  farewells  Georgetown_University  GOP  history  identity_politics  institutions  institutional_change  institutional_path_dependency  leaders  legacies  MLK  Obama  obstructionism  reconciliation  structural_change  systemic_change  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  Tea_Party 
january 2017 by jerryking
Those who focus on police reform are asking the wrong questions - The Globe and Mail
AMANDA ALEXANDER
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 29, 2016

The deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile underscore two truths about the United States: We make it difficult for people to get by and harder yet to care for each other. After decades of slashing welfare budgets and increasing investments in prisons, federal and state governments have charted a path for the country’s poorest: aggressive policing and incarceration. We’ve locked people out of the formal job market and criminalized their survival.

It is not coincidental that officers in New York and Baton Rouge killed Eric Garner and Alton Sterling, respectively, in the course of policing informal economies (selling loose cigarettes and CDs). We simply make life hard for people – until we extinguish it entirely....Each day, we require black people to risk their lives to be cafeteria workers, teachers, therapists. The United States demands impossible sacrifices from black people to sustain its economy, and has since slavery.

What does this have to do with police reform?

Very little. Reformers are asking the wrong questions. They have turned to increased police training and altered use-of-force protocols to end this nightmare. Fortunately, some among us demand another way. Young black activists are not just asking, “How do we make cops stop shooting us?” but instead, “What do our communities need to thrive? How do we get free?” They’re not begging for scraps; they’re demanding the world they deserve. If there’s a future for any of us, it’s in asking these questions, demanding fundamental shifts in resources and organizing like hell.....Meanwhile, cash-strapped cities continue to raise revenue from policing and fining the poor. And because of insufficient social service investment, Americans rely on police to be first responders to crises of mental health, addiction and homelessness.
policing  African-Americans  reform  informal_economy  mental_health  addictions  existential  foundational  homelessness  community_organizing  incarceration  institutional_path_dependency  structural_change  questions  Black_Lives_Matter  cash-strapped  cities  reframing  political_organizing 
july 2016 by jerryking
Too much stuff, with no one to buy it: Is this the future economy? - The Globe and Mail
Scott Barlow
Too much stuff, with no one to buy it: Is this the future economy?
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Feb. 02, 2016

University of California professor Brad DeLong’s “Economics and the Age of Abundance” highlighted the new economic study of global production growth – a new-ish school of thought that attributes much of the economic malaise in the developed world to a technology-driven “too much of everything.....The economic challenges of abundance, however, go far beyond commodities. There’s too many mutual funds, television channels, cereal brands, auto companies (China hasn’t even started exporting cars and trucks yet), land-line telephones, clothing brands, taxis, department stores and, if we’re being honest, journalism. Technology and its ability to increase productivity are to blame for virtually any major market sector beset with poor profit margins and layoffs. ....... The larger problem, and I suspect Mr. DeLong would agree, is that technology increases efficiencies and reduces the need for labour. A dystopian future in which anything can be produced quickly and cheaply, except everyone’s unemployed with no money to spend, is easy to envisage without considerable structural change in the economy.

Unemployment is the most severe outgrowth of abundance and low profitability ....... ......
abundance  economics  economists  Colleges_&_Universities  oversupply  technology  commodities  over_investment  scarcity  innovation  China  productivity  deflation  manufacturers  outsourcing  unemployment  job_destruction  job_displacement  downward_mobility  hollowing_out  books  developed_countries  dystopian_futures  structural_change  developing_countries 
february 2016 by jerryking
The Evolving Automotive Ecosystem - The CIO Report - WSJ
April 6, 2015| WSJ | By IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER.

An issue in many other industries. Will the legacy industry leaders be able to embrace the new digital technologies, processes and culture, or will they inevitably fall behind their faster moving, more culturally adept digital-native competitors? [the great game]

(1) Find new partners and dance: “The structure of the automotive industry will likely change rapidly. Designing and producing new vehicles have become far too complex and expensive for any likely one company to manage all on its own.
(2) Become data masters: “Know your customers better than they know themselves. Use that data to curate every aspect of the customer experience from when they first learn about the car to the dealership experience and throughout the customer life cycle. Having data scientists on staff will likely be the rule, not the exception.
(3) Update your economic models: “Predicting demand was hard enough in the old days, when you did a major new product launch approximately every five years. Now, with the intensity of competition, the rapid cadence of new launches, and the mashup of consumer and automotive technology, you may need new economic models for predicting demand, capital expenditures, and vehicle profitability.
(4)Tame complexity: “It’s all about the center stack, the seamless connectivity with nomadic devices, the elegance of the Human Machine Interface.
(5) Create adaptable organizations: “It will take a combination of new hard and soft skills to build the cars and the companies of the future. For many older, established companies, that means culture change, bringing in new talent, and rethinking every aspect of process and people management.
Apple  automotive_industry  autonomous_vehicles  ecosystems  Google  know_your_customer  adaptability  CIOs  layer_mastery  competitive_landscape  competitive_strategy  connected_devices  telematics  data  data_driven  data_scientists  customer_experience  curation  structural_change  accelerated_lifecycles  UX  complexity  legacy_players  business_development  modelling  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  SMAC_stack  cultural_change  digitalization  connected_cars  the_great_game 
april 2015 by jerryking
The Dangers and Opportunities in a Crisis
October 7, 2012 | NYTimes.com | By HUGO DIXON, Hugo Dixon is the founder and editor of Reuters Breakingviews.

Wherever one turns — politics, business, medicine, ecology, psychology, virtually every field of human activity — people talk about crises. But what are they, how do they develop and what can people do to change their course?

The first thing to say is that a crisis is not just a bad situation. When the word is used that way, it is devalued. The etymology is from the ancient Greek: krisis, or judgment. The Greek Orthodox Church uses the term when it talks about the Final Judgment — when sinners go to hell, but the virtuous end up in heaven. The Chinese have a similar concept: The characters for crisis combine parts of those for danger and opportunity.

A crisis is a point when people have to make rapid choices under extreme pressure, normally after something unhealthy has been exposed in a system. To use two other Greek words, one path can lead to chaos; another to catharsis or purification.

A crisis is certainly a test of character. It can be scary. Think of wars; environmental collapses that destroy civilizations of the sort charted in Jared Diamond’s book “Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed”; mass unemployment; or individual depression that leads to suicide.

But the outcome can also be beneficial. This applies whether one is managing the aftermath of the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy, the current euro crisis, the destruction of an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico or an individual’s midlife crisis. Much depends on how the protagonists act.

Students of crises are fond of dividing them into phases. For example, Charles Kindleberger’s “Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises” identifies five phases of a financial crisis: an exogenous, normally positive, shock to the system; a bubble in which people exaggerate the benefits of that shock; distress when some investors realize that the game cannot last; the crash; and finally a depression.

Although there is much to commend in Mr. Kindleberger’s system, it is too rigid to account for all crises in all fields. It also downplays the possibility that decision makers can change the course of a crisis. A more flexible scheme that leaves space for human agency to affect how events turn out has just two phases: the bubble and the crash......The bubble is typically characterized by mania and denial. Things are going well — or, at least, appear to be. Feedback loops end up magnifying confidence...............Manic individuals do not know their limitations and end up taking excessive risks — whether on a personal level or in managing an organization or an entire economy. As the ancient Greeks said, hubris comes before nemesis........But before that, there is denial. People do not wish to recognize that there is a fundamental sickness in a system, especially when they are doing so well........The ethical imperative in this phase is to *burst the bubble before it gets too big*. That, in turn, means both being able to spot a bubble and having the courage to stop the party before it gets out of hand [JCK: courage = "political will"] . Neither is easy. It is hard to recognize a sickness, given that there is usually some ideology that explains away the mania as a new normal. The few naysayers can be ridiculed by those who benefit from the continuation of the status quo.

What is more, politicians, business leaders and investors rarely have long-term horizons. So even if they have an inkling that things are not sustainable, they may still have an incentive to prolong the bubble.......The crash, by contrast, is characterized by panic and scapegoating. People fear that the system could collapse. Negative feedback loops are in operation: The loss of confidence breeds further losses in confidence. This is apparent on an individual level as much as on a macro one.

..Events move extremely fast, and decisions have to be made rapidly........The key challenge is to make effective decisions that avoid vicious spirals while not embracing short-term fixes that fail to address the fundamental issues. With the euro crisis, for example, it is important to improve competitiveness with structural reforms and not just rely on liquidity injections from the European Central Bank.[JCK: "structural change"]

In this phase, no one denies that there is a problem. But there is often no agreement over what has gone wrong. Protagonists are reluctant to accept their share of the responsibility but instead seek to blame others. Such scapegoating, though, prevents people from reforming a system fundamentally so that similar crises do not recur.[JCK: "systemic change"].....Crises will always be a feature of life. The best that humanity can do is to make sure it does not repeat the same ones. And the main way to evolve — both during a bubble and after a crash — is to strive to be honest about what is sick in a system. That way, crises will not go to waste.
blaming_fingerpointing  books  bubbles  catharsis  chaos  character_tests  clarity  crisis  dangers  decision_making  denials  economic_downturn  feedback_loops  Hugo_Dixon  individual_agency  Jared_Diamond  manias  market_crash  new_normal  opportunities  overconfidence  political_will  risks  scapegoating  short-sightedness  societal_choices  speed  structural_change  systemic_change  systemic_risks 
february 2015 by jerryking
Anti-austerity looks less cartoonish by the day - The Globe and Mail
DOUG SAUNDERS
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jan. 31 2015

Greece has overwhelmingly elected a government run by the left-wing, anti-austerity coalition Syriza. New Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras tellingly described the country’s bailout program, which directs the devastated Greek economy entirely toward debt repayment at any cost, as “fiscal waterboarding” and said he will demand a writedown of the debt.
Greece  elections  austerity  Doug_Saunders  Greek  stimulus  debt  debt_foregiveness  structural_change 
february 2015 by jerryking
What I learned in Ferguson - The Globe and Mail
OMAR EL AKKAD
What I learned in Ferguson
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Dec. 07 2014

...the underlying, centuries-old imbalances that allow such a thing to happen. ...an entire urban structure built on inequality....Last weekend, the Globe published a story on how the Ferguson protests have become an American phenomenon, sparking a nationwide conversation on race, poverty and violence. But where there is a story about breadth, there is also a story about depth....the fault lines of segregation exist not along one axis but two: race and wealth....To make ends meet, municipalities such as Ferguson have resorted to more direct means – namely, fees and court fines. Jaywalking and speeding citations aren’t just a tool for enforcing public safety, they’ve increasingly become a financial necessity.

But beyond creating a sense of resentment among the citizenry, these revenue tools have direct and sometimes life-changing consequences. In a place where the median household income is about $37,500 (roughly $10,000 less than the state average), tickets often go unpaid, leading to a warrant, which in turn can lead to arrest, destroying job prospects in the process.

But there’s more. In Missouri, those on parole or probation are not allowed to vote. That means a fine that started out as a financial measure for the municipality can end up as a tool of political disenfranchisement.
Omar_el_Akkad  Ferguson  life-changing  resentments  police_brutality  structural_change  inequality  segregation  disenfranchisement  fault_lines  municipalities  institutional_path_dependency  imbalances 
december 2014 by jerryking
Blair’s problem is that it’s 2014, not 2004 - The Globe and Mail
ADAM RADWANSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 31 2014,

There is good reason that the heads of most major police forces are lucky to last a decade on the job, as Chief Blair has, let alone beyond it. Over the years, the mandate from civilians will inevitably change, as old challenges are addressed and new ones arise. And for a variety of reasons, the loss of public trust to inevitable controversies and the difficulty of maintaining support among police rank-and-file among them, a chief who comes in driving one agenda is not often willing or able to pivot to a different one....But partly because the city has on the whole become safer, the police board’s criteria for a suitable chief have changed. As governments at all levels tighten their belts, there is a growing push to rein in police costs that have mostly been given a free pass – climbing, in Toronto, to more than $1-billion annually.

As the board has pushed him to find savings, Chief Blair has aggressively resisted. Had he not done so, it is unlikely he would have been able to keep his force behind him for as long as he has. But that just adds to the impetus to bring in someone new.

So, too, does the perception that having in recent years been surrounded by a tight circle of confidantes, Chief Blair is too set in his ways to seriously consider structural changes that could improve efficiencies – merging or even eliminating certain units, for instance, or replacing officers with civilians for office tasks.

The desire for institutional reform helps explain why there is speculation that the board, which may have unusual latitude in choosing his successor given the city’s lack of a functional mayor, will bring in a fresh set of eyes from outside the force. Executive-leadership skills will probably count for more than previously, and having climbed up through the ranks for less.

To his civilian overseers, in other words, Chief Blair looks like yesterday’s man.
Bill_Blair  Toronto  mayoral  cost-cutting  fresh_eyes  institutional_change  civilian_oversight  police  police_force  policing  Toronto_Police_Service  Toronto_Police_Services_Board  structural_change 
july 2014 by jerryking
Wondering How Far Magazines Must Fall
August 12, 2012 | NYT | By DAVID CARR.

Because of changes to the informational ecosystem, weeklies have been forced to leave behind the news and become magazines of ideas. Ms. Brown understood that; it’s just that some of her ideas weren’t always very good...The problem is not Tina Brown or her conceptual obsessions, or even the calcified formula of the weekly magazine.

The problem is more existential than that: magazines, all kinds of them, don’t work very well in the marketplace anymore.

Like newspapers, magazines have been in a steady slide, but now, like newspapers, they seem to have reached the edge of the cliff. Last week, the Audit Bureau of Circulations reported that newsstand circulation in the first half of the year was down almost 10 percent. When 10 percent of your retail buyers depart over the course of a year, something fundamental is at work....It’s not just consumers who are playing hard to get: advertising is down 8.8 percent year to date over the same miserable period a year ago, according to the Publishers Information Bureau. With readership in such steep decline and advertising refusing to come back, magazines are in a downward spiral that not even their new digital initiatives can halt.
reinvention  magazines  David_Carr  future  digital_media  Tina_Brown  ideas  newsstand_circulation  advertising  downward_spirals  structural_change  print_journalism  seismic_shifts  newspapers  decline  digital_disruption 
august 2012 by jerryking
Trader Hits Jackpot in Oil, As Commodity Boom Roars On - WSJ.com
February 28, 2008| WSJ | By ANN DAVIS.
Mr. Hall Bet Early On Market Shift; Buoying Citigroup.

Profiles Andrew J. Hall, an enigmatic British-born trader who, in 2003, anticipated an important shift in the way the world valued oil -- and bet big....Mr. Hall's bet -- that long-term and short-term energy prices would soon abandon their historical relationship with one another -- looked like a long shot when he made it....Around 2003, Mr. Hall became convinced big structural changes were looming in the oil markets. For more than a decade, oil had ranged from $10 to $30 a barrel. But growth in demand was starting to outstrip growth in supply. And the once-sleepy economies of China and India were starting to compete for that fuel.

To place his bet, he focused on what was then a stagnant corner of the commodities world: The extremely long-term market in which traders buy and sell oil to be delivered years in the future.

Futures are contracts to buy or sell a product later on, at a price agreed upon today. Back in 2003, oil for future delivery was considerably cheaper than oil in the "spot," or current, market. For instance, a barrel of oil for delivery in 2005 was as much as 20% cheaper than spot oil....A key to Mr. Hall's success, says a friend, Thomas Coleman, a Louisiana oil-storage executive and fellow art collector, is an ability to block out the noise of the crowd. When Mr. Hall "locks in on an idea, he'll take it to the extreme," Mr. Coleman says.
Citigroup  Phibro  traders  oil_industry  hedge_funds  big_bets  commodities  collectors  pattern_recognition  structural_change  extremities  commodities_supercycle  ratios  noise  turbocharge  extremes 
june 2012 by jerryking
Fundamental Forces Affecting U.S. Fresh Produce Growers and Marketers
Fundamental Forces Affecting U.S. Fresh Produce Growers and Marketers
Roberta L. Cook
JEL Classifications: Q13, L10, L22, M21
Keywords: Competitiveness, Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, Fresh Produce, Market Forces, Porter's Five Forces, Shipper, Structural Change
competitiveness  fruits  vegetables  Five_Forces_model  shippers  structural_change  Roberta_Cook  agribusiness  agriculture  farming  fresh_produce  competitive_landscape 
june 2012 by jerryking
"Structural Breaks" and Other Timely Phenomena -
December 12, 2008 |Adam Smith, Esq.|Bruce MacEwen.

Finally, some words about strategy in the midst of a structural dislocation. Times like these—especially times like these—call for coherent responses on behalf of your firm to the challenges out there in the marketplace. This, rather than any tepid or hypocritical "mission statement" or allegedly scientific market segmentation analysis that will be overtaken by events before it can be bound and distributed,, is the type of strategy that actually has traction today.

And the essence of such a strategy is a thoughtful and reflective view on the marketplace forces at work, and how they'll affect your firm, your talent pipeline, your geographic centers of gravity, and your client base. To produce a coherent, nuanced, and dynamic view of what's happening, there's no substitute for the hard work of thinking about this multi-dimensional chessboard, with almost daily midcourse corrections based on new data points and new conversations, essentially incoming at you all the time.
Bruce_MacEwen  McKinsey  financial_history  simplicity  ratios  strategic_thinking  talent_pipelines  structural_change  howto  customers  Five_Forces_model  competitive_landscape  situational_awareness  course_correction  disequilibriums  accelerated_lifecycles  dislocations  hard_work  dynamic 
november 2011 by jerryking
The Missing Fifth - NYTimes.com
May 9, 2011| NYT | By DAVID BROOKS. Americans should be
especially alert to signs that the country is becoming less vital &
industrious. One of those signs comes from the labor market. As my
colleague David Leonhardt points out, in 1954, about 96 % of American
men between the ages of 25 & 54 worked. Today that number is around
80 %. One-fifth of all men in their prime working ages are not getting
up & going to work...The result is this: There are more idle men now
than at any time since the Great Depression, & this time the
problem is mostly structural, not cyclical. These men will find it hard
to attract spouses. Many will pick up habits that have a corrosive
cultural influence on those around them. The country will not benefit
from their potential abilities. This is a big problem. It can’t be
addressed through the sort of short-term Keynesian stimulus some on the
left are still fantasizing about. It can’t be solved by simply reducing
the size of govt. as some on the right imagine.
cultural_corrosion  David_Brooks  gender_gap  unemployment  men  Great_Depression  participation_rates  structural_change  Keynesian  joblessness  habits  values 
may 2011 by jerryking
How to Structure Your Sales Team
October 17, 2008, BusinessWeek By Karen E. Klein Whether you
take your sales effort in house, use a sales brokerage, or go with
independent reps, each route has key factors to weigh.
howto  structural_change  sales_training  sales_teams  marketing 
february 2011 by jerryking
Breaking the Silence - Op-Ed - NYTimes.com
Aug. 1, 2004 | New York Times | By HENRY LOUIS GATES JR. Why
has it been so difficult for black leaders to say such things in
public, without being pilloried for ''blaming the victim''? Why the huge
flap over Bill Cosby's insistence that black teenagers do their
homework, stay in school, master standard English and stop having
babies?...Yet in too many black neighborhoods today, academic
achievement has actually come to be stigmatized. ...Making it, as Mr.
Obama told me, ''requires diligent effort and deferred gratification.
Everybody sitting around their kitchen table knows that.''...the causes
of black poverty are both structural and behavioral. Think of structural
causes as ''the devil made me do it,'' and behavioral causes as ''the
devil is in me.'' Structural causes are faceless systemic forces, like
the disappearance of jobs. Behavioral causes are self-destructive life
choices and personal habits. To break the conspiracy of silence, we have
to address both of these factors.
African-Americans  Henry_Louis_Gates  silence  Obama  self-destructive  anti-intellectualism  poverty  values  Bill_Cosby  delayed_gratification  structural_change  academic_achievement 
september 2010 by jerryking
Canadians must think beyond the U.S. market
Mar. 06, 2010 | Globe and Mail | Jeffrey Simpson. The U.S.
is burdening itself with debt, postponing days of fiscal reckoning. Huge
structural changes, meanwhile, are occurring in the world economy. The
challenge for Canadian business, Mr. Carney argued, is to move beyond
the cocoon of the North American economy.

He put the challenge squarely: “Canadian business will need to develop
new markets as the traditional advantage of relatively open access to
U.S. markets becomes less valuable. To seize new opportunities, our
productivity levels must improve."At issue is whether Canadian
businesses can think beyond the U.S. market. If not, Canada will be
missing most of the new economic action. It's a hard challenge for a
country with so many branch plants, so few head offices, so much
self-satisfaction, and a long tradition of looking only south.
crossborder  productivity  economic_development  growth  head_offices  Jeffrey_Simpson  international_marketing  international_trade  complacency  beyondtheU.S.  Mark_Carney  structural_change  internationally_minded 
april 2010 by jerryking
Think Small - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 14, 2007 | Wall Street Journal | by RAJAN
VARADARAJAN. Article touting the merits of incremental--versus
radical-- approaches to innovation. Incremental innovations can: help
support radical innovations; play a major role in helping companies
enter new markets, by modifying existing products to suit new customers;
help take charge of fragmented industries -- those with lots of small,
regional competitors; help companies on their home turf (i.e. line
extensions); help a company increase the price premium on its products;
help companies neutralize the impact of competitors' innovations; help
companies respond to big changes in their industry.
innovation  radical  P&G  incrementalism  breakthroughs  fragmented_markets  small_wins  structural_change  taxonomy  new_markets  marginal_improvements  quick_wins 
january 2010 by jerryking
Google, the great disruptor, takes aim ... at everything - The Globe and Mail
Omar El Akkad and Iain Marlow

From Saturday's Globe and Mail Published on Friday, Jan. 08, 2010 9:32PM
EST Last updated on Saturday, Jan. 09, 2010.

A decade ago, the Web company made its name by helping people find
things on the Internet. But Google no longer believes the future of the
Web is on the personal computer. Instead, the company predicts most
people will soon be connecting to the outside world through mobile
devices. If that prediction is right, it means that's where advertising
dollars are going too.

Today, Google is expanding into more areas than at any time in its
history: smart phones, e-readers, operating systems, on-line stores. Its
unveiling this week of the first Google-branded phone running on the
Android system, the Nexus One, was just the latest such expansion.

And in almost every sector it touches, Google is disrupting the
ecosystem, creating a new wave of winners and losers in its wake.
Google  disruption  structural_change  competitive_landscape  expansions  ecosystems  Omar_El_Akkad  Iain_Marlow 
january 2010 by jerryking
Book Review: "The Laws of Disruption" - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 12, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by JEREMY PHILIPS who
reviews The Laws of Disruption, By Larry Downes
Basic, 298 pages, $26.95. The central thesis of "The Laws of
Disruption" is that "technology changes exponentially, but social,
economic and legal systems change incrementally." When it comes to the
digital revolution, Mr. Downes says, our laws have not kept pace with
the changes that it has brought about. Downes counsels that authorities
(regulators and judges) use a light touch--as opposed to introducing
ever new laws and regulations --because the rapid pace of change makes
it impossible to predict the course of technology.
book_reviews  books  competitive_landscape  digitalization  disruption  incrementalism  innovation  intellectual_property  Internet  legal_system  rapid_change  regulation  regulators  structural_change  technological_change 
october 2009 by jerryking
From Shock to Action - Floyd Norris Blog - NYTimes.com
January 31, 2009, NYT blog post by Floyd Norris on the
seven-step progression experienced by industries undergoing structural
change.

Industries facing severe structural change go through a seven-step progression before they manage to deal with it, said Rita McGrath, an associate professor at Columbia Business School.

1. Shock.
2. Denial. “This can’t be happening to me.”
3. Sadness. “This is awful.”
4. Anger. “I don’t deserve this.”
5. Bargaining.
6. Acceptance.
7. Renegotiation. It is then that companies find ways to change their business model to survive.
business_models  Floyd_Norris  structural_change  competitive_landscape  industries 
february 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - Corporate survival: Be ready to chart a new course when industry winds blow
Oct. 1, 2007 G&M column by Harvey Schachter on Anita
McGahan's suggestions on how to interpret the signals of industry
change.

Determine whether your core activities or core assets are threatened - or both. Core activities are those actions that have historically generated profits for the industry, such as owning dealerships in the auto industry, which is less significant in an Internet era. Core assets are the resources, knowledge, and brand capital that have made the organization unique, like blockbuster drugs in the pharmaceutical industry.

(1) Radical Change.our core activities and core assets are both threatened with obsolescence. This is similar to the concept of disruptive change outlined by Harvard's Clayton Christensen in his writings.

(2) Intermediating Change. Core activities are threatened while core assets retain their strength. Sotheby's, for example, remains top notch at assessing works of art but because of technology eBay can challenge on the matchmaking side of the business.

(3) Creative Change. Core assets are under threat but core activities remain stable, as in pharmaceuticals or oil and gas exploration, where relationships with customers and suppliers are fairly steady but assets turn over constantly. Innovation occurs in fits and starts.

(4) Progressive Change. Both core assets and core activities are stable, but significant change still threatens, as in discount retailing, long-haul trucking, and commercial airlines.
assets  Clayton_Christensen  Harvey_Schachter  strategy  industries  structural_change  preparation  readiness  warning_signs  howto  interpretation  core_businesses  obsolescence  taxonomy  change  pivots 
january 2009 by jerryking

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