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jerryking : superfans   8

Engaging Movie Fans, From Teaser to Premiere - The New York Times
JUNE 14, 2015 | NYT | By MICHAEL CIEPLY.

start-up helps studios cultivate potential audiences’ enthusiasm with early sales of tickets and movie-related products.....Kernel has been quietly burrowing into one of Hollywood’s more persistent problems. That is, how to channel and exploit audience enthusiasm, which can peak with the release of an early trailer (New Line’s “Snakes on a Plane,” from 2006) or a vibrant experience at Comic-Con (“Scott Pilgrim vs. the World,” in 2010), but then dissipate before the movie arrives in theaters...Mr. Harvilicz and Mr. Martinez began Kernel, which now has about a dozen employees. They have turned what started as an itch into a largely web-based business that proposes to help studios engage with fans while capturing dollars from the moment a blockbuster begins to generate excitement, or between releases in a long-running series like the X-Men films, from Fox and Marvel....Prices can reach $1,000, for a premium package that includes two tickets to a yet-to-be-scheduled film premiere. “It’s the second generation of crowdfunding,” said Mr. Harvilicz.

The ticket sales help studios reach theater customers without getting directly into an exhibition business that is barred to them by longstanding legal strictures.
Hollywood  movies  start_ups  films  Kernel  entertainment_industry  studios  superfans  engagement  fan_engagement 
june 2015 by jerryking
At Apple's Grand Central Store, iPhones Aren't the Only Draw - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 9, 2011 | WSJ | By JESSICA E. VASCELLARO and IAN SHERR
Apple's Hottest New Product Can Be Thrown in the Wash
Fans Collect Company's T-Shirts, Kept in Limited Supply; 'Star Trek' Model
T-Shirts  Junior_Achievement  Apple  retailers  Jessica_E._Vascellaro  superfans 
january 2012 by jerryking
BETTER THAN FREE
[2.5.08] | EDGE | By Kevin Kelly.

This super-distribution system has become the foundation of our economy and wealth. The instant reduplication of data, ideas, and media underpins all the major economic sectors in our economy, particularly those involved with exports — that is, those industries where the US has a competitive advantage. Our wealth sits upon a very large device that copies promiscuously and constantly....how does one make money selling free copies?

I have an answer. The simplest way I can put it is thus:

When copies are super abundant, they become worthless.
When copies are super abundant, stuff which can't be copied becomes scarce and valuable. When copies are free, you need to sell things which can not be copied. What can't be copied?
(1) "Trust." Trust cannot be copied. You can't purchase it. Trust must be earned, over time. It cannot be downloaded. Or faked. Or counterfeited (at least for long).
(2) Immediacy
(3) Personalization
(4) Interpretation — As the old joke goes: software, free. The manual, $10,000.
(5) Authenticity — You might be able to grab a key software application for free, but even if you don't need a manual, you might like to be sure it is bug free, reliable, and warranted. You'll pay for authenticity.
(6) Accessibility — Ownership often sucks. You have to keep your things tidy, up-to-date, and in the case of digital material, backed up. And in this mobile world, you have to carry it along with you. Many people, me included, will be happy to have others tend our "possessions" by subscribing to them. We'll pay Acme Digital Warehouse to serve us any musical tune in the world, when and where we want it, as well as any movie, photo (ours or other photographers).
(7) Embodiment — At its core the digital copy is without a body. You can take a free copy of a work and throw it on a screen. But perhaps you'd like to see it in hi-res on a huge screen? Maybe in 3D? PDFs are fine, but sometimes it is delicious to have the same words printed on bright white cottony paper, bound in leather.
(8) Patronage — It is my belief that audiences WANT to pay creators. Fans like to reward artists, musicians, authors and the like with the tokens of their appreciation, because it allows them to connect. But they will only pay if it is very easy to do, a reasonable amount, and they feel certain the money will directly benefit the creators.
(9)Findability — findability is an asset that occurs at a higher level in the aggregate of many works. A zero price does not help direct attention to a work, and in fact may sometimes hinder it. But no matter what its price, a work has no value unless it is seen; unfound masterpieces are worthless. — being found is valuable.
network_effects  free  Kevin_Kelly  value_creation  digital_economy  immediacy  scarcity  personalization  abundance  findability  patronage  embodiment  accessibility  authenticity  interpretation  replication  Information_Rules  value_added  superfans  SaaS  ownership 
november 2011 by jerryking
The Art of Creating 'Superfans' -
August 24, 2010 | BusinessWeek | Eric Groves. 1. Create a
great customer experience. 2. Provide access. 3. Share your knowledge.
Customers want information from you, not just a sales pitch. Whether
you’re using a blog, e-mail newsletter, social media marketing tools, or
a combination of all three, make sure you’re not just hawking the
latest items for sale. It’s better to share your expertise.
customer_experience  customer_appreciation  customer_loyalty  superfans  howto 
august 2010 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: The circles (no more strangers)
Posted by Seth Godin on May 17, 2010

Consider this hierarchy: Strangers, Friends, Listeners, Customers,
Sneezers, Fans and True Fans. One true fan is worth perhaps 10,000 times
as much as a stranger. And yet if you're in search of strangers, odds
are you're going to mistreat a true fan in order to seduce yet another
stranger who probably won't reward you much.
Seth_Godin  customer_loyalty  segmentation  market_segmentation  marketing  superfans  customer_segmentation 
june 2010 by jerryking
How Harley Davidson Revs Its Brand
October 1, 1997 | Strategy + Business Issue 9 | By Glenn
Rifkin. Harley-Davidson has been able to build a community of
enthusiasts around its brand that includes members from very diverse
groups, and with almost no advertising. How does the king of heavyweight
motorcycling keep its fans so loyal? It gives them a reason to
"belong."
marketing  Harley-Davidson  motorcycles  superfans  customer_loyalty  branding  brands 
december 2009 by jerryking

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