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Amazon Wants to Rule the Grocery Aisles, and Not Just at Whole Foods
July 28, 2019 | The New York Times | By Karen Weise.

In early 2017, a memo, “Grocery Shopping for Everyone," circulated inside Amazon that imagined an ambitious new grocery chain........The new stores, the document envisioned, would have robust sections for produce, fresh food and prepared meals. Nonperishable products, like paper towels or canned beans, would be stored on a separate floor, away from customers. Shoppers could order those items with an app, and while they shopped for fresh food, the other products would be brought down in time for check out. There would also be an area to pick up groceries ordered online and to manage packages for delivery drivers......A few months later, in June 2017, Amazon barged into the grocery business in a different way, by announcing a blockbuster deal to buy Whole Foods for $13.4 billion.......The memo and other big grocery proposals stopped circulating inside Amazon, as Whole Foods demanded everyone’s attention.....now, two years later, instead of Whole Foods being the answer to Amazon’s grocery ambitions, it seems to have only whetted executives’ appetites.

The marriage has made clear the difficulties of selling fresh food inexpensively, either in a physical store or through delivery. Bananas are not the same as books....But the combination has also shown glimmers of success, particularly in delivery. And that has provided some fuel to Amazon executives pushing to add another food-selling option — one built from the ground up that would change how people buy groceries.....Amazon is now quietly exploring an ambitious new chain, probably separate from Whole Foods, that is not far removed from the one outlined in the old memo. It would be built for in-store shopping as well as pickup and delivery.....“People really need to understand — Whole Foods is the beginning, it’s not the end,” ......“It’s not everything.”......In an effort to shed Whole Foods’ “whole paycheck” reputation, Amazon bought more from national food distributors and cut back on the local farms......Other price-cutting efforts failed. The former head of a major produce company said Amazon told him it wanted to sell marquee fresh items at low prices every day. The executive said he had to explain that certain products, like berries or lettuce, may be available all year thanks to global supply chains, but that they cost more in the off-season. Forcing flat, low prices would put too much risk on growers.

Amazon executives, the person said, were caught off guard by the response. It didn’t seem as if they had fully appreciated how seasonality made predictable pricing far harder than selling cereal or paper towels.......Amazon has also run into some trouble integrating Whole Foods into its delivery machine.

Amazon never saw delivering cold milk and fragile fruit to doorsteps as something for the masses, according to former employees. Instead, executives thought of it as an option for people who wanted high-quality foods and could afford a premium price to have fragile and fresh items arrive at their doorstep......In theory, that was a good fit for Whole Foods and its affluent shoppers. Within six months, Amazon began making two-hour deliveries from Whole Foods in four cities for Prime members. Six months later, that had expanded to more than two dozen cities. It’s now available in 90.

But Whole Foods stores are not like Amazon’s delivery warehouses. Because Whole Foods sells so many fresh items, its stores have smaller back-of-house areas than a standard supermarket. That means employees who pick products for online orders must gather more items from the same shelves as shoppers. They roam aisles with scanners in hand, asking associates on the floor when they can’t find something......deliveries have shown big potential, making up almost all of Whole Foods’ growth......The promise of serving customers, but doing so more efficiently, has Amazon thinking again about aggressive investment in groceries.

Rather than dramatically substantially expand Whole Foods, .....Amazon is considering designing stores specifically with pickup and delivery in mind, and with a smaller area dedicated to fresh shopping — as the old memo imagined.....Amazon is interested in “creating multiple customer experiences under one roof.”.......Amazon has been looking for spaces close to Whole Foods locations, indicating a hub-and-spoke approach where one store serves as the warehouse and commissary for others.....To be a major grocery player, Amazon would need a little more than 2,000 stores, the old memo estimated. That’s far fewer than the 5,000 run by Walmart, the country’s top grocery seller, but more than the roughly 1,200 operated by Publix. Whole Foods got Amazon about a quarter of the way there.

A store designed with different shopping options......would be “highly scalable.”
Amazon  back-office  BOPIS  grocery  home_delivery  hub-and-spoke  in-store  Kroger  perishables  price-cutting  seasonality  supermarkets  Whole_Foods 
7 weeks ago by jerryking
America’s Biggest Supermarket Company Struggles With Online Grocery Upheaval
April 21, 2019 | WSJ | By Heather Haddon.

Kroger adjusts operations and invests in technology to hang on to customers who avoid stores; ‘we’ve got to get our butts in gear
Amazon  bricks-and-mortar  BOPIS  CDO  cultural_clash  delivery_services  digital_strategies  disruption  e-commerce  e-grocery  grocery  IBM  Instacart  Jet  Kroger  Microsoft  millennials  Ocado  Oracle  pilot_programs  post-deal_integration  retailers  same-day  Shipt  start_ups  supermarkets  Vitacost  Wal-Mart  Whole_Foods 
april 2019 by jerryking
Amazon to Launch New Grocery-Store Business
March 1, 2019 | WSJ | By Esther Fung and Heather Haddon.

Amazon is planning to open dozens of grocery stores in several major U.S. cities....as the retail giant looks to broaden its reach in the food business and touch more aspects of consumers’ lives......The new stores would be distinct from the company’s upscale Whole Foods Market chain. It isn’t clear whether the new stores would carry the Amazon name......Amazon in recent years has become increasingly focused on physical retail, posing a threat to traditional grocers. The new chain would help Amazon in fulfilling a yearslong initiative to build out a physical grocery presence, which was at one point potentially envisioned to reach more than 2,000 brick-and mortar stores in a variety of sizes and formats......Amazon is also exploring purchasing regional grocery chains with about a dozen stores under operation, one person said, that could bolster the new chain......Amazon’s further push into physical retail is its latest move far beyond its origins selling books and music on the web. Over the years it has become a cloud-computing giant, a major player in Hollywood entertainment and a burgeoning provider of logistics services. More recently it has emerged as a major competitor in digital advertising and launched forays in finance and health care......The new stores aren’t intended to compete directly with the more upscale Whole Foods stores and will offer a different variety of products, at a lower price point, these people said. Whole Foods doesn’t sell products with artificial flavors, colors, preservatives and sweeteners, among other quality standards.

Suppliers with big brands have hoped to have inroads into Whole Foods since Amazon bought the chain nearly two years ago. While Whole Foods has gradually expanded the big brands it carries—such as Honey-Nut Cheerios and Michelob beer—a conventional grocer can carry a much larger assortment of items. Amazon has had mixed results with its food-delivery business, and it wants to better understand how it can cater to grocery shoppers....Supermarket operators Walmart Inc., Kroger Co. and others are also trying to find ways to offer delivery and pickup to customers in a more cost-efficient manner...Amazon’s new grocery brand also comes as the retailer rolls out its cashierless Amazon Go stores in urban areas. It is testing that checkout technology for bigger retail stores. Meanwhile, Whole Foods is expanding its national footprint....For its new stores, Amazon is targeting new developments and occupied stores with leases ending soon.....Amazon doesn’t want restrictions on the type of goods it may sell at its stores and wants the ability to change the store and sell health and beauty products for instance......It is unclear whether these new stores will be cashierless, but they will be heavily tilted to customer service and pickup capabilities......a strategy where big retailers combine e-commerce with physical stores is the direction the industry is heading.
Amazon  BOPIS  bricks-and-mortar  cashierless  e-commerce  food  grocery  home-delivery  in-store  Kroger  new_businesses  physical_retail  rollouts  supermarkets  Wal-Mart  Whole_Foods 
march 2019 by jerryking
Let the grocery chains fix Canada’s cannabis-supply mess
January 11, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | ANDREW WILLIS.

Despite the long run-up to legalization of recreational marijuana last October, demand for legal cannabis is outstripping supply and the retail system is a mess. ....The Ontario government held a lottery last Friday to award licenses for its first 25 stores, which aren’t expected to open until April. Experts say the nascent industry’s nation-wide logistical issues will take months, if not years, to fix.

Who wins out of this chaos? Criminals. Removing the social stigma from cannabis without ensuring robust cultivation and retail networks are in place opens the door to black-market suppliers, the folks the federal Liberals were trying to put out of business when they started down the path to legalization. Who can set things right, by getting cannabis into the hands of those who want it at prices the black market will be hard pressed to match? How about Jim Pattison, along with the Weston and Sobey clans and the folks running Metro Inc. Provincial governments should be looking to the national grocery and drug store chains to deliver on the federal Liberals' promise of a modern approach to marijuana sales.

Mr. Pattison, who runs the 45,000-employee Jim Pattison Group, has been showing shoppers the love for six decades. Think about what greets you when you walk into one of the former car salesman’s Save-On-Foods grocery stores in Western Canada, or a large-format Loblaws, Sobeys and Metro outlet.
Andrew_Willis  black_markets  cannabis  criminality  grocery  retailers  supermarkets  raw_materials  scarcity  supply_chains  gangs  nationwide  organized_crime 
january 2019 by jerryking
Checking Out New York’s Online Grocery Stores and All Their Trimmings - WSJ
U.S. NEW YORK METRO MONEY
Checking Out New York’s Online Grocery Stores and All Their Trimmings
Newer services offer smaller order minimums and shorter delivery windows

Faster grocery delivery services are battling for business. PHOTO: TIM BOWER

0 COMMENTS
By Anne Kadet
Nov. 20, 2018 10:00 a.m. ET
All seems relatively peaceful on the streets of New York these days. But in truth, there is a battle afoot—between online grocery services competing to offer same-day delivery. They’re fighting for space in your pantry. They want to deliver your Thanksgiving turkey.

New York’s busy families have long relied on traditional online grocery delivery services like FreshDirect and Amazon Fresh for big shipments, typically scheduled a day in advance.

But as this market matures, attention has turned to the more spontaneous shopper. The newer services feature smaller order minimums, faster online shopping and shorter delivery windows.

Last week, on a Monday morning, I placed orders with three of the more high-profile competitors in this space—FoodKick, Amazon Prime Now and Jet—to compare them on selection, ease of ordering, price and delivery. I now have enough baby carrots to last me through Christmas.

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New_York_City  grocery  supermarkets  e-commerce  e-grocery  home-delivery 
november 2018 by jerryking
Walmart and Amazon in acquisition shopping spree | Financial Times
The move reflects the realities of the grocery business, analysts say. “In no sector is physical footprint more important than food,” says Charlie O’Shea from Moody’s. “Dairy has to be delivered quickly. Just like what Walmart did last year in buying Jet.com, Amazon recognises that it’s more effective to buy it than build it.” 

Amazon may use Whole Foods’ stores to beef up its offerings in ordering, pick-up and delivery, or use its distribution centres to deliver products for AmazonFresh trucks, says Mr Huang. “Building a cold supply chain with refrigerated trucks is not easy or cheap to do,” he says. 
Wal-Mart  Amazon  grocery  supermarkets  cold_storage 
november 2018 by jerryking
The incredible shrinking grocery store
NOVEMBER 8, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | RASHA MOURTADA.

Today's urban shoppers – whether they're 35 or 65 – are generally looking for two things in a grocery store: prepared food that tastes homemade and household staples such as paper towels and dishwashing detergent. They want a shopping experience that's more contained but still meets all their needs....Grocery store guru Paco Underhill on three trends he expects to see in North American supermarkets:

Hybrid stores: Think part traditional shopping, part Internet shopping. He expects customers to shorten trips by submitting shopping lists in advance to stores and selecting only certain items – produce and meat, for instance – themselves when they pick up their order.

Refillable containers: He expects a bulk shopping model – widespread today for dry goods – to take off for household supplies such as laundry soap, where shoppers will bring back large containers for refills.

Private label 'stores': Imagine all of Loblaws' President's Choice products in one spot within the store. "Rather than shelving these products throughout the store, they're concentrated in one area, so the shopper looking for the best price sees it all together," says Mr. Underhill.
big-box  boutiques  grocery  Highland_Farms  retailers  small_spaces  supermarkets  Wal-Mart  Paco_Underhill  trends  downsizing  prepared_meals 
october 2018 by jerryking
Costco Wholesale expands online grocery in Ontario | News
Costco launched its Canadian grocery site and delivery service in July.

“This new shopping option makes available a wider selection of quality goods available to members and businesses across Ontario - from Windsor to Ottawa.".

Initially introduced in Toronto and the Golden Horseshoe markets in July, the success of the service has prompted Costco to offer grocery delivery across the province, with the exception of Northern Ontario. The new service features hundreds of grocery items including health and beauty aid products along with vitamins and supplements.

All orders from the site come with a two-day delivery guarantee with no delivery fees for orders over $75.
Costco  e-commerce  e-grocery  free  grocery  home-delivery  order-size  supermarkets  Toronto  Golden_Horseshoe 
september 2018 by jerryking
Amazon’s Ripple Effect on Grocery Industry: Rivals Stock Up on Start-Ups
Aug. 21, 2018 | The New York Times | By Erin Griffith.

When Amazon bought Whole Foods Market. The $13.4 billion deal shook the grocery world, setting off a frenzy of deals and partnerships that continues to intensify. Traditional retailers pursued digital technology, and online companies reconsidered their relationship with brick-and-mortar retail......“Are technology folks like us going to figure out retail faster than the retailers figure out technology?” [the Great Game] ..... “In some ways we’re all kind of fighting the same fight against the gigantic folks online.”

Food shopping is one of the last major holdouts to online retail. Groceries are unique in that their inventory is perishable, fragile and heavy. Grocery customers often shop at the last minute, like to see the food they are about to eat and don’t want to pay high delivery fees.

Even Amazon, with its Amazon Fresh online grocery service, has struggled to gain ground in the business. The company’s Whole Foods deal, paired with Walmart’s 2016 acquisition of Jet.com, underscored that the future of selling food and household items requires cooperation between the digital natives and the old-school retailers.....Grocery companies “are realizing that with Walmart and Amazon moving at their pace, you need to pick yours up, too,” .... “I wouldn’t call it fear. I would call it a wake-up call.”....... Market research conducted by Morgan Stanley in July found that 56 % of consumers who were likely to order groceries online said they would most likely order from Amazon, compared with 14 % who would go to a mass merchandiser and 10 % who would use their local supermarket. Phil Lempert, a grocery industry analyst, predicted store closings for chains that do not evolve to meet the changing needs of customers. Stores offering curated selections, specialty items, cooking classes and the option to buy online and pick up in person will thrive,......Josh Hix, chief executive of Plated, a meal kit start-up, said the Amazon-Whole Foods deal had immediately changed his discussions with grocery chains. Meal kit companies have a checkered record. But the grocery companies saw an opportunity to use Plated’s data and research on recipes and taste preferences......Most of the big grocers “have wanted to kill us, partner with us, invest in us or buy us — all probably in the course of the same conversation,”......The ownership structure allows Boxed to license its technology to its retail competitors in the United States as they try to become more digital. The company is in talks with 10 or so potential partners for various pieces of its technology. They include mobile app technology, personalization software, a packing algorithm that maximizes space in shipping boxes, software that tracks item expiration dates, order management software and warehouse robotics automation........Grocery delivery is difficult to do affordably, but tech-driven efficiencies like those developed by Boxed, Amazon and others have forced change on the industry.

“Consumers want convenience and will pay more for it,
Amazon  AmazonFresh  bricks-and-mortar  e-commerce  home-delivery  partnerships  retailers  same-day  start_ups  the_Great_Game  Whole_Foods  fulfillment  grocery  supermarkets  ripple_effects  e-grocery 
august 2018 by jerryking
The Freshest Ideas Are in Small Grocery Stores
July 31, 2018 | The New York Times | By Kim Severson.

Most North Americans still buy their food at the classic supermarket, with its wide aisles and seemingly limitless choices. But stores like Kroger, the nation’s largest chain with more than $105 billion in sales in 2017, are being cannibalized by a host of discount competitors like Dollar General and Aldi on one side, and by the growing dominance of Amazon and online delivery on the other.

“By and large, supermarkets are kind of behind the eight ball” in responding to changes in how people shop, said Diana Smith, the associate director of retail and apparel for the market research company Mintel.

Customers, especially younger ones, want stores that offer what some industry analysts have come to call “food experiences,” with craft beer on tap, meals to go and vegetable butchers. They tend to shop only when they cook, visiting more than one store to collect ingredients, rather than making a weekly trip to stock the pantry with toilet paper, chuck roast and gallons of milk.

Large chains are throwing everything they can at the problem, planning smaller stores customized for different demographics. Kroger, which already sells clothes at some of its stores, has developed a grab-and-go fashion line called Dip, and is testing driverless delivery. The Midwestern chain Hy-Vee is adding medical clinics and spa-inspired bath boutiques to its stores.

But some of the most radical reinvention is happening at the local level, in both cities and small towns, where a new breed of small community stores use the grocery aisles to fill cultural niches and address social needs.
creativity  ideas  grocery  small_spaces  supermarkets  Kroger 
august 2018 by jerryking
Inside FreshDirect’s Big Bet to Win the Home-Delivery Fight - WSJ
By Jennifer Smith
July 18, 2018 5:30 a.m

Designed to keep food fresh longer and move it faster, FreshDirect’s 400,000 square-foot distribution centre is the online grocer’s multimillion-dollar bet on the fastest-growing sector in the grocery business, home-delivery. FreshDirect pioneered the e-commerce home-delivery market, and now with Amazon and big grocery chains like Kroger Co. piling on investments, companies are jockeying for position in a business that some believe is the future of supermarket sales.....FreshDirect's trucks now provide next-day delivery to customers across the New York-New Jersey, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas, with plans to expand into Boston next. The private company says it generated between $600 million and $700 million in annual revenue in 2017.

It declined to disclose the cost of the new facility, which was financed with the help of a $189 million investment round in 2016 led by J.P. Morgan Asset Management, direct funding and incentives from state and local governments......Amazon, Target Corp. and other large companies have invested hundreds of millions of dollars to expand food delivery and build out their grocery e-commerce operations. Supermarket chain owner Koninklijke Ahold Delhaize NV’s Peapod unit, the longest-running online grocery service in the U.S., has expanded to 24 markets and is investing in technology to cut its handling and delivery costs.

Walmart Inc. said this month that Jet.com, the online retailer it bought two years ago, will open a fulfillment center in the Bronx this fall to help roll out same- and next-day grocery deliveries in New York City.

The grocers are trying to solve one of the toughest problems in home delivery: Getting food to doorsteps in the same condition consumers would expect if they went to the store themselves. Delivering perishables is trickier than dropping off paper towels or dogfood. Fruit bruises, meat spoils, eggs break. ........FreshDirect’s logistic hurdles start well before delivery. It must get products from its suppliers to the building, process the food, then pick, pack and ship orders before the quality degrades.

That is why the new distribution centre has 15 different temperature zones. Tomatoes do best at about 55 degrees, but “chicken and meat like it to be just at 32 degrees... it gives more of shelf life to it,"....Software determines the most efficient route for each order, and tells workers which items to pick.....A big part of the facility [distribution centre] is ripping out tons and tons of operating costs out of the business.....The stakes in getting the technology right are high. FreshDirect is competing with grocery chains that often fill online orders through their stores, using a mix of staff and third-party services like Instacart Inc. So-called click-and-collect services, where consumers swing by to pick up their own orders, tend to have better margins because the retailer isn’t paying for last-mile delivery.....Online-only operations with centralized warehouses tend to be more efficient than logistics run out of stores, because they use fewer workers and can position goods for faster fulfillment.
algorithms  Amazon  big_bets  cold_storage  distribution_centres  distribution  e-commerce  food  FreshDirect  grocery  home-delivery  infrastructure  Kroger  logistics  perishables  retailers  software  supermarkets  Target  Wal-Mart  warehouses  fulfillment  same-day  piling_on  last_mile 
july 2018 by jerryking
A Year After Amazon Devoured Whole Foods, Rivals Are Pursuing Countermoves - WSJ
By Heather Haddon
June 10, 2018

Amazon.com Inc.’s AMZN +0.30% year-old acquisition of Whole Foods is prompting the food industry to retool how it sells fresh food to consumers....The deal has been “shaking up the food industry from top to bottom,” said Angela Spivey, a food-and-beverage attorney at McGuireWoods LLP, who is advising clients on how to quickly change their packaging and marketing to sell at Amazon and Whole Foods. “Don’t be surprised if the milk and cereal just shows up at your door based on your usual eating habits.”

Food retailers, manufacturers and other suppliers have begun to make fundamental changes to their selling strategies, driven partly by stronger sales and delivery from Whole Foods stores since the acquisition.....Grocery chains have accelerated planned investments in online delivery and pickup services, in some cases bumping plans ahead to two- to three-year timelines instead of five to seven years, .......Dozens of supermarkets have struck deals with Instacart Inc., an online grocery-delivery service that has expanded to more than 200 retailers from 30 before Amazon’s deal. .......After Amazon extended discounts at Whole Foods to Prime members—which will help it gather data about shoppers’ preferences—analysts said competitors might need to update their own shopper-loyalty programs. Amazon now offers free, two-hour delivery and additional 10% discounts on several hundred items for Prime members in select areas.

Many food makers are redesigning their packaging and formulas to better sell through Amazon and Whole Foods, placing an emphasis on online repeat purchases instead of impulse buys, industry consultants said......Whole Foods has focused on getting competitive on staples, said Guillaume Bacuvier, chief executive of Dunnhumby, an international retail consulting and technology firm that Whole Foods hired to help improve consumer analytics.
Amazon  Amazon_Prime  BOPIS  contra-Amazon  Dunnhumby  food  grocery  Instacart  perishables  supermarkets  Whole_Foods 
june 2018 by jerryking
Walmart Expands Online Grocery Delivery to 100 Cities - The New York Times
By TIFFANY HSU and NICK WINGFIELD MARCH 14, 2018

“There is a lot of experimenting going on as everyone tries to figure out that last-mile delivery — it’s a tough economic equation to make work,” said Mike Knemeyer, a professor of logistics at Ohio State University. “But if you can, you’ll have a big head start on the others, and you’ll end up making money not just in groceries but on all of the things that you sell.”

The nexus of e-commerce and grocery sales is increasingly appealing to retailers.
Wal-Mart  home-delivery  e-commerce  grocery  supermarkets  Amazon  Whole_Foods  distribution_channels  logistics  same-day  delivery_networks  last_mile 
march 2018 by jerryking
Inside Amazon Go, a Store of the Future - The New York Times
Jan. 21, 2018 | NYT | By Nick Wingfield

....Amazon’s store of the future hits you right at the front door. It feels as if you are entering a subway station. A row of gates guard the entrance to the store, known as Amazon Go, allowing in only people with the store’s smartphone app......Every time customers grab an item off a shelf, Amazon says the product is automatically put into the shopping cart of their online account. If customers put the item back on the shelf, Amazon removes it from their virtual basket. The only sign of the technology that makes this possible floats above the store shelves — arrays of small cameras, hundreds of them throughout the store. Amazon won’t say much about how the system works, other than to say it involves sophisticated computer vision and machine learning software. Translation: Amazon’s technology can see and identify every item in the store, without attaching a special chip to every can of soup and bag of trail mix. ........Amazon Go, checking out feels like — there’s no other way to put it — shoplifting. ......A big unanswered question is where Amazon plans to take the technology. It won’t say whether it plans to open more Amazon Go stores, or leave this as a one-of-a-kind novelty. A more intriguing possibility is that it could use the technology inside Whole Foods stores, though Ms. Puerini said Amazon has “no plans” to do so.

There’s even speculation that Amazon could sell the system to other retailers, much as it sells its cloud computing services to other companies.
Amazon_Go  Amazon  cashierless  computer_vision  convenience_stores  customer_experience  grocery  machine_learning  one-of-a-kind  supermarkets  retailers  Whole_Foods 
january 2018 by jerryking
Produce or Else: Wal-Mart and Kroger Get Tough With Food Suppliers on Delays
Nov. 27, 2017 | WSJ | By Annie Gasparro, Heather Haddon and Sarah Nassauer

Grocers are giving food companies a tougher mandate: Ship on time, or pay the price.
Food retailers want their suppliers to resolve the persistent problem of delayed or incomplete deliveries, which they say costs them millions of dollars a year in lost sales and overtime pay.
Retailers used to give suppliers more leeway, since any number of factors—bad weather, a surge in demand, technology malfunctions—can foil deliveries of cereal, cheese, candy and other packaged goods from warehouses scattered around the country.
But now as traditional grocers battle Amazon.com<http://Amazon.com> Inc. and other online retailers that prioritize delivery speed, as well as price-cutting discounters, more are taking a strict line with suppliers, telling them on-time deliveries will translate directly into more sales and profits.
Delayed deliveries can leave holes on store shelves. Sales of some $75 billion a year are lost because products are out of stock or unsalable for other reasons, according to the Food Marketing Institute, a trade organization. That is about 10% of annual grocery sales industry-wide at a time when sales growth is hard to come by. “It’s a massive opportunity from a financial and customer standpoint,” .....The country’s biggest grocers are leading the charge. Kroger is fining suppliers $500 for every order that is more than two days late to any of its 42 warehouses, and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is charging suppliers monthly fines of 3% for deliveries that don’t arrive exactly on time, according to the retailers. They began issuing the fines in August........Wal-Mart has signaled it could do more than levy fines if problems persist. Charles Redfield, executive vice president of food for Wal-Mart U.S., told suppliers they could also lose shelf space if they don’t solve their delivery issues, according to people in attendance at a supplier meeting earlier this year. Retailers can threaten suppliers with loss of promotional space in stores, analysts said.....Packaged-goods companies are straining to keep up with the demands and remain in the good graces of retailers. They need GPS trackers and software to adjust routes in real time. Filling full orders fast is also challenging, since many manufacturers house items all over the country. That is particularly true for refrigerated items needing costly cold storage—which has fueled investments in more fulfillment centers......“Shipping complete orders on time is a completely reasonable request but turns out it’s harder than it sounds.”...
Wal-Mart  Kroger  grocery  supermarkets  supply_chains  retailers  delays  food  shipping  Amazon  cold_storage  penalties  delivery_times  fulfillment  CPG  Kraft_Heinz  P&G  on-time  shelf_space  supply_chain_squeeze 
november 2017 by jerryking
Whole Foods changes unlikely to spark Canadian grocery price wars
August 29th | The Globe and Mail | by DAVID FRIEND.

The country's biggest grocers are unlikely to play along with deep cuts by Whole Foods' new owner Amazon in the aisles of its 13 locations across Canada. That's partly because the imminent threat of the high-end chain wouldn't justify the financial hit of reacting with deep discounts, suggested Brynn Winegard, a marketing expert at Winegard and Company.

"Places like Loblaws, Sobeys and Longo's won't necessarily be able to afford that," she said.

"But what you will be looking at is a huge market play towards loyalty."

Winegard expects established chains to lean on their reputations – and points-redemption programs – in hopes of keeping customers from straying to competitors in the short term.

Expect better deals on taking home three bottles of spaghetti sauce instead of two, for example, and more appealing bonus point offers designed to get customers back into stores. Both are generally more affordable, and effective, strategies than deep cuts to a wide assortment of products.

Price wars have a long history of offering Canadian grocers little upside, especially if their profit margins are cut to the bone.......Canadian grocers are misdirecting their attention to storefronts, rather than establishing infrastructure that could go head-to-head in the digital world, Amazon's forte.

"Amazon certainly has the capacity, the capability and the website support to do this – the other stores, like Loblaw and Sobeys, aren't really there yet."
supermarkets  grocery  Loblaws  Sobeys  Longo's  Amazon  Whole_Foods  Canadian  price_wars  loyalty_management  oligopolies 
august 2017 by jerryking
Supermarkets Face a Growing Problem: Too Much Space - WSJ
By Heather Haddon and Julie Jargon
July 31, 2017

A massive retail build-out has taken a toll on earnings, leaving the industry vulnerable to closures; ‘There’s only so much food we can buy’....Supermarket chains operating in dense areas where shoppers have more online grocery options are particularly vulnerable to future consolidation, according to Barclays Capital Inc., which said that 38 of the top 50 grocery markets in the U.S. are already too saturated by food retail per capita or are on track to be so by next year......the growth in groceries has extended across many types of retailers in recent years. Part of the expansion comes from grocers, who accelerated their store openings as a way to drive sales growth after the 2008 recession. At the same time, club chains, dollar stores, pharmacies—and even gas stations—increased their fresh food offerings to drive traffic and boost profits.....The food-retail sector has become even more saturated at a time when competition is only getting fiercer, particularly at the two ends of the shopping spectrum. Growing European deep-discounters Aldi and Lidl are vying for U.S. market share, hoping their prices will win over the budget-conscious shopper while internet companies like Amazon.com Inc. are trying to lure higher-income grocery shoppers online. Regional supermarkets and conventional ones such as Kroger Co. and Albertsons Cos. are the most likely to get squeezed in the process, according to analysts....... enduring changes in eating and food-shopping habits toward cheaper and more convenient options means consumers will increasingly spread their dollars among a variety of retailers.
retailers  grocery  supermarkets  oversaturation  e-commerce  barbell_effect  real_estate  store_openings  commercial_real_estate  prepared_meals  convenience_stores  pharmacies  overcapacity  Aldi  Lidl  consolidation 
july 2017 by jerryking
The Amazon-Walmart Showdown That Explains the Modern Economy - The New York Times
Neil Irwin @Neil_Irwin JUNE 16, 2017

The decision by Amazon and Walmart to compete for my grocery business — as well as for space in my closet — is a tiny battle in a war to dominate a changing global economy.

And for companies that can’t compete on price and technology, it could cost them the shirt off their backs.....[Amazon's purchase of high-end grocery chain Whole Foods places it] on a collision course with Walmart to try to be the predominant seller of pretty much everything you buy.

Each one is trying to become more like the other — Walmart by investing heavily in its technology, Amazon by opening physical bookstores and now buying physical supermarkets. But this is more than a battle between two business titans. Their rivalry sheds light on the shifting economics of nearly every major industry, replete with winner-take-all effects and huge advantages that accrue to the biggest and best-run organizations, to the detriment of upstarts and second-fiddle players.....in turn...this has more worrying implications for jobs, wages and inequality.

Amazon vs. Walmart

Both want to sell everything!!!!

Walmart is buying Bonobos, an omnichannel innovator. Its website and online customer service are excellent, and it operates stores in major cities where you can try on garments and order items to be shipped directly. Because all the actual inventory is centralized, the stores themselves can occupy minimal square footage. The acquisition helps Walmart build expertise in the very areas where it is trying to gain on Amazon.

Walmart and Amazon have had their sights on each other for years, each aiming to be the dominant seller of goods via omnichannel.

Amazon's purchase of Whole Foods helps it to understand the grocery business which has a whole different set of challenges from the types of goods that Amazon has specialized in heretofore.

A Positive Returns-to-Scale World
The apparel business has long been a highly competitive industry in which countless players could find a niche.....any shirt-maker that tried to get too big rapidly faced diminishing returns.It would have to pay more and more to lease the real estate for far-flung stores, and would have to outbid competitors to hire all the experienced shirt-makers. The expansion wouldn’t offer any meaningful cost savings and would entail a lot more headaches trying to manage it all....in the digital economy, rather than reflecting those diminishing returns to scale, show positive returns to scale: The biggest companies have a huge advantage over smaller players. That tends to tilt markets toward a handful of players or even a monopoly....The apparel industry...is moving in the direction of being like the software business (high fixed costs, zero variable costs, enormous returns to scale)..... the reason why Walmart and Amazon are so eager get into the shirt business is because retailers know that they need to figure out how to manage sophisticated supply chains connecting Southeast Asia with stores in big American cities so that they rarely run out of product. They need mobile apps and websites that offer a seamless user experience so that nothing stands between a would-be purchaser and an order....Larger companies that are good at supply chain management and technology can spread those more-or-less fixed costs around more total sales, enabling them to keep prices lower than a niche player and entrench their advantage....large companies will invest in automation/robotics...the future of clothing/apparel might be a handful of companies with the very expensive shirt-making robots---and everyone else shut out in the cold.

What It Means for the Economy

A relative few winners are taking a disproportionate share of business in a wide range of industries....in turn may help explain why the income gap has widened in recent years. How much on income inequality is driven by shifting technology — as opposed to changing corporate behavior, or loose antitrust policy — is an open debate.
increasing_returns_to_scale  winner-take-all  fixed_costs  variable_costs  Amazon  Wal-Mart  Whole_Foods  retailers  economics  Bonobos  shirts  mens'_clothing  omnichannel  apparel  digital_economy  automation  robotics  competitive_landscape  market_concentration  barbell_effect  income_inequality  antitrust  market_power  corporate_concentration  grocery  fresh_produce  supermarkets  large_companies  UX  inventory-free  global_economy 
june 2017 by jerryking
Amazon shakes up grocery sector with $13.7-billion Whole Foods deal - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jun. 16, 2017

Amazon’s latest planned takeover “is a testament to the digital disruption of the grocery landscape,” Mr. Allison said, noting the acquisition “brings together a combined strength in digital and brick and mortar.”

Fresh foods have been a critical battlefield for grocers as consumers have increasingly shifted their spending to fresh from processed fare in a bid to eat healthier, industry experts say. And 75 per cent of consumers prefer to purchase fresh foods in person rather than online, Nielsen data show. Now Amazon will try to steal that growing but lucrative portion of the business from incumbents with the help of the acquisition, industry watchers said.

Even restaurant operators will feel the pinch of Amazon’s takeover of Whole Foods, which has a $3-billion restaurant business. Indeed, the acquisition “is a seminal moment in the world of eating,” said David Palmer, retail analyst at RBC Dominion Securities.

Amazon is speeding up its delivery capabilities in select markets to as fast as one hour, Mr. Palmer noted. “The combined company is poised to become a category killer in the home meal solution business,” he said.
Sylvain_Charlebois  Marina_Strauss  prepared_meals  grocery  supermarkets  seminal_moments  Whole_Foods  Amazon  e-commerce  retailers 
june 2017 by jerryking
Amazon to Buy Whole Foods for $13.7 Billion - WSJ
By Austen Hufford
Updated June 16, 2017

While grocery accounts for a large component of consumer sales overall, online retailers have largely been unable to fully crack the code. They face hurdles like consumers wanting to pick their own produce and the need to deliver fresh and frozen food to people’s homes.

Adding a network of grocery stores could help Amazon tackle those issues. Whole Foods has roughly 450 locations spread out across 42 states. The move could allow Amazon to reach customers closer to their homes and even sell more than just groceries. Amazon’s bookstores also sell its electronic products like book readers, tablets and media streaming devices.
Whole_Foods  Amazon  grocery  supermarkets  fresh_produce  AmazonFresh 
june 2017 by jerryking
What’s New in the Supermarket? A Lot, and Not All of It Good - The New York Times
By STEPHANIE STROMMAY 16, 2017
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grocery  innovation  supermarkets 
may 2017 by jerryking
Big-Name Food Brands Lose Battle of the Grocery Aisle - WSJ
By Annie Gasparro
Updated April 30, 2017

America’s packaged-food giants are losing the battle for retailers’ shelf space, complicating their efforts to break out of a yearslong slump. Instead of promoting canned soup, cereal and cookies from companies like Kraft Heinz Co. Kellogg Co., and Mondelez International Inc., grocery stores are choosing to give better play to fresh food, prepared hot meals, and items from local upstarts more in favor with increasingly health-conscious consumers. [Grocery stores] are seeking ways to... maximize return on our shelf space,..........[Grocery stores] like other retailers, aren’t giving up on big brands. But finding new ways to entice people to walk through the center aisles again is tricky.

Some brands are seeking ways to get their products into the fresh and prepared foods section of the store. But, Mr. Fitzgerald says: “If we overrun perishables with all the big packaged brands, we lose our competitive edge.”

Instead, retailers such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. are pressuring big brands to lower their prices as a way to attract customers..........Companies like Hershey and PepsiCo Inc. said they are working with retailers to be creative. “That’s a conversation we’ve been having with some of the retailers, to say ‘how can we help you rethink the center store so that we can bring growth back,” said Pepsi Chief Indra Nooyi on a conference call last week, when it reported declines in its Quaker Foods division. “Our hope is that with the rejuvenation of the center store, our categories will grow, too.”.......Big brands are increasingly focusing on improving profitability through cost-cutting and consolidation. Kraft and Heinz combined two years ago as slow growth spurred a need for savings. Kraft Heinz Co. has been able to cut more than $1 billion from the two predecessor companies’ budgets. Some analysts say Kraft Heinz’s sights could be set on Mondelez, which unsuccessfully attempted to buy Hershey last year... Kraft and Mondelez used to be part of the same conglomerate until 2012, when it was split in two.
grocery  supermarkets  brands  retailers  CPG  Kraft_Heinz  shelf_space  Kellog  Mondelez  Hershey  PepsiCo  prepared_meals  perishables  fresh_produce 
may 2017 by jerryking
Whole Foods to Close All Three Regional Kitchens - WSJ
By ANNIE GASPARRO and JESSE NEWMAN
Updated Jan. 25, 2017

Whole Foods Market Inc. is closing its three commercial kitchens, where it makes ready-to-eat meals for stores, including one location which received a regulatory warning about food safety violations last year.

The decision to outsource the food preparation, which was announced to employees last week, comes as Whole Foods works to cut costs by centralizing certain functions and reducing its workforce. ...to streamline operations, we have decided to leverage the expertise of our supplier network to create some of the high-quality prepared foods sold in our stores...Supermarkets across the sector are offering more prepared meals, with some even opening sushi restaurants and wine bars inside their stores. Fresh prepared foods generated $15 billion in sales in supermarkets in 2005, a figure that has nearly doubled to about $28 billion last year, according to Technomic, a food industry research firm.

But the explosion of prepared meals has brought new food-safety issues.
Whole_Foods  grocery  commercial_kitchens  supermarkets  food_safety  product_recalls  Outsourcing  prepared_meals  FDA  centralization  high-quality 
january 2017 by jerryking
Amazon Working on Several Grocery-Store Formats, Could Open More Than 2,000 Locations - WSJ
By LAURA STEVENS and KHADEEJA SAFDAR
Updated Dec. 5, 2016

Amazon.com Inc. unveiled Monday its first small-format grocery store, Amazon Go, one of at least three brick-and-mortar formats the online retail giant is exploring as it makes a play for an area of shopping that remains stubbornly in-store....The Amazon Go store, at roughly 1,800 square feet in downtown Seattle, resembles a convenience store-format in a video Amazon released Monday. It features artificial intelligence-powered technology that eliminates checkouts, cash registers and lines. Instead, customers scan their phone on a kiosk as they walk in, and Amazon automatically determines what items customers take from the shelves. After leaving the store, Amazon charges their account for the items and sends a receipt....While Amazon is moving into brick-and-mortar grocery shopping, other large retailers are expanding their online services. Wal-Mart’s curbside pickup service offers some convenience without the cost of home delivery.
Amazon  Amazon_Go  grocery  supermarkets  analog  home-delivery  e-commerce  small_spaces  store_footprints  bricks-and-mortar  artificial_intelligence  AmazonFresh  convenience_stores  cashierless  in-store 
december 2016 by jerryking
Target Revamps Staffing for Grocery Business - WSJ
By KHADEEJA SAFDAR
Updated Sept. 7, 2016

The stakes are high for Target to improve groceries, which account for about a fifth of its revenue. Fewer shoppers visiting stores to buy its perishable foods has been a drag on profits at a time when the retailer is facing declining sales.

Since taking over in 2014, CEO Brian Cornell has tried to make Target a more compelling destination for groceries. The former Safeway Inc. and PepsiCo Inc. executive has changed leadership in the category, added more organic items to the assortment and invested in store design.
grocery  supermarkets  Target  merchandising  specialization 
september 2016 by jerryking
Loblaw’s price war spreads through Canada’s grocery sector - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2016
Loblaws  cost-cutting  retailers  grocery  supermarkets  price_wars 
august 2016 by jerryking
A Seismic Shift in How People Eat - The New York Times
By HANS TAPARIA and PAMELA KOCHNOV. 6, 2015

....Consumers are walking away from America’s most iconic food brands. Big food manufacturers are reacting by cleaning up their ingredient labels, acquiring healthier brands and coming out with a prodigious array of new products. ....Food companies can’t merely tinker. Nor will acquisition-driven strategies prove sufficient, because most acquisitions are too small to shift fortunes quickly. ....For legacy food companies to have any hope of survival, they will have to make bold changes in their core product offerings. Companies will have to drastically cut sugar; process less; go local and organic; use more fruits, vegetables and other whole foods; and develop fresh offerings. General Mills needs to do more than just drop the artificial ingredients from Trix. It needs to drop the sugar substantially, move to 100 percent whole grains, and increase ingredient diversity by expanding to other grains besides corn....a complete overhaul of their supply chains, major organizational restructuring and billions of dollars of investment, but these corporations have the resources.
food  foodservice  brands  supply_chains  innovation  shifting_tastes  Nestlé  Perdue  Tyson  antibiotics  trends  Kraft  supermarkets  fresh_produce  OPMA  consumer_behavior  General_Mills  iconic  consumers  McDonald's  ingredient_diversity  seismic_shifts  new_products  Big_Food 
november 2015 by jerryking
Ontario Tender Fruit Lab
October- December 2014

Found by Googling "challenges import exotic fresh produce ontario"
Ontario  fruits  fresh_produce  branding  organic  agribusiness  agriculture  farming  retailers  supermarkets  grocery  MaRS  sustainability  challenges  problems  solutions  farmland  local 
august 2015 by jerryking
Big retailers miss the mark on local foods » strategy
Tanya Kostiw May 28, 2015

if local products were more available, nearly 90% of those who value them would be willing to beef up their monthly grocery spend. Less than half of these consumers say large grocery chains stock and promote these products well, and ranked these retailers well behind farmers’ markets (91%) and independent stores (71%) in that area.

Large grocery retailers have yet to figure out how to be nimble enough to bring on smaller suppliers, which would lead to partnerships with more suppliers of this size, rather than with fewer larger manufacturers, says Graeme McVie, general manager and VP business development for Precima, LoyaltyOne’s data analytics arm.

And consumers (not just in Canada) are visiting more than one destination to address their varying needs, says McVie, offering the example of a shopper following a trip to the grocery store with a Whole Foods visit because they’re driven there for a particular reason – be it the proposition around organics or freshness, service or presentation.
local  fresh_produce  retailers  supermarkets  grocery 
june 2015 by jerryking
The incredible shrinking retail sector - The Globe and Mail
BARRIE McKENNA
The incredible shrinking retail sector
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Feb. 12 2015

Entire categories of products are moving online, making many bricks-and-mortar stores redundant. Video and book stores are all but gone. Office supply, electronics and department stores are in retreat. A future without auto showrooms and movie theatres may be coming.

The era of the big-box store has peaked as city dwellers move back downtown, where space is at a premium.
Barrie_McKenna  retailers  size  mergers_&_acquisitions  downsizing  small_spaces  grocery  supermarkets  pharmacies  proximity  convenience_stores  store_footprints  post-deal_integration  bricks-and-mortar  consolidation  distribution_channels  Target  Wal-Mart  Loblaws  competitive_landscape  e-commerce  fresh_produce  perishables  big-box  supply_chains 
february 2015 by jerryking
The raw and the clicked
; Retailing
The Economist409.8864 (Nov 30, 2013): n/a.
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retailers  grocery  supermarkets  e-commerce  BCG  Tesco  Amazon  fresh_produce 
february 2015 by jerryking
The End of the Impulse Shopper - WSJ
Nov. 25, 2014 | WSJ |By SHELLY BANJO and SARA GERMANO.

An endangered species in the retail landscape is the ''impulse buy''...grocery shoppers are becoming more intentional and this is paving the way for more innovation in physical and digital merchandising.....Many Americans have the money and the will to spend. But they are time-pressed and deal savvy, visiting stores only when they run out of items like cereal or toilet paper and after doing extensive research on purchases online and with friends. They buy what they came for—and then leave. Those habits threaten more than just gum sales at checkout. Impulse is why stores offer deep discounts on loss leaders, why they put the milk in the back corner and why marketers spend heavily to pile up products in displays at the ends of the aisles. If shoppers just target the deals and don’t let their eyes wander, long cherished models for boosting sales fall apart...the symptoms of the industry’s malaise are clear enough: extended declines in shopper traffic, weak sales growth, and a discount-driven race to the bottom that is sapping pricing power.
impulse_purchasing  bricks-and-mortar  retailers  grocery  supermarkets  habits  discounting  shopping  shopping_experience  Turnstyle  intentionality  discretionary_spending  loss_leaders  foot_traffic  merchandising  frugality  decline  symptoms  endangered  time-strapped 
january 2015 by jerryking
Is this the death of the grocery store? - The Globe and Mail
SYLVAIN CHARLEBOIS
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Oct. 13 2014
grocery  supermarkets  Loblaws  Wal-Mart  Sylvain_Charlebois 
october 2014 by jerryking
Bill McFarland: Why it’s crucial to embed innovation in business plans - The Globe and Mail
GUY DIXON
TORONTO — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Apr. 29 2014,

When it comes to innovation, wouldn’t it be better to be second--to let another company assume the headaches and expense of innovating first?

A lack of drive to innovate or even taking solace in being second best has been a trait of Canada’s business DNA. ... innovation as a means to try out new things, even if they mean going out on a limb, with a greater possibility of failure. But he notes the importance of building innovation into a business plan. Some companies, he said, also reward employees for trying and even failing, setting up a company culture in which not trying is seen as a bigger problem than continual success.
PwC  fast_followers  innovation  business_planning  CEOs  Sobeys  grocery  supermarkets  customer_experience  failure  organizational_culture  mediocrity  Michael_McDerment  messiness 
september 2014 by jerryking
Britain’s big supermarkets rewrite their grocery lists - FT.com
September 11, 2014 11:41 pm
Britain’s big supermarkets rewrite their grocery lists
By Andrea Felsted,
United_Kingdom  supermarkets  grocery  retailers 
september 2014 by jerryking
Retailers compete with Amazon: Lowes Foods
July 11, 2014 | CNBC | Kristina Yates.

"What do we do to survive?" That's the No. 1 question branding expert Martin Lindstrom gets from his clients, brick-and-mortar stores.

Lindstrom's answer: entertainment. Create an "in-store sensory experience, and a sense of community, that can't be packaged and delivered by mail, or perhaps by drone in the future," "We have five senses that we can appeal to. When you go to Amazon, you have a maximum of appealing to two senses."

Appealing to all the senses is a concept that Lowes Foods, a 99-location grocery chain across the Carolinas and Virginia, is embracing wholeheartedly. The company hired Lindstrom and his team to give its traditional stores a makeover.
......
The store in Clemmons, North Carolina—ground zero for the chain's reinvention of the grocery shopping experience—doesn't look like a traditional supermarket. On the outside, it looks more like a greenhouse. On the inside, it's a mix of farmer's market and theme park.

"It's an experience. It feels like a destination, like we're going to Disneyworld," said long-time customer Mike Parnitzke.

Lindstrom hired writers from Walt Disney to create a storyline throughout the store. The most visual and unique example of that philosophy is the "Chicken Kitchen," where each chicken is celebrated with a chicken dance when it comes out of the rotisserie oven. Then there's "Sausageworks," which looks like a crazy laboratory complete with a crazy sausage professor, concocting whacky sausage flavors like the "Star Spangler," a bacon cheddar cheeseburger sausage for the Fourth of July. The "Beer Den" lets customers sample local draft beers. There's also the community table, hosting events from recipe sharing to speed dating.

"It's really about finding a connection with the guest. To have them come back and say, 'Oh my gosh, I had so much fun here in your store,'" said store manager Kate Allred...... brick-and-mortar stores have to create a memorable experience if they want to retain customers. "Brick-and-mortar stores are not necessarily going away," she said, "but we know that 20 percent of all specialty retail spending is done online."

According to the Food Marketing Institute, consumers spent $5.8 billion online grocery shopping in 2012. It's an industry that is attracting heavyweights like Amazon and Wal-Mart, and already has established players like Peapod.com, Freshdirect.com and Harris Teeter.

"You can't compete on volume, you can't compete on prices because the online retailer will always win," said Lindstrom.

Lowes Foods' new, rebranded store has seen basket size rise 7 percent and transaction volume increase 23 percent since January, the grocer says.
.
The company is remodeling 10 more stores this year, but Lindstrom said the work doesn't stop when the makeover is done. "This is like a sand castle. It's beautiful day one, day two it starts to fall apart. To communicate that to an organization of 10,000 people, and in some cases a million people, is pretty hard. It has to go through the system."
.....

The company's hiring pool has also changed. "If we can go look, for example, at local schools of arts, schools of theater, let's go find some folks who can go through and play the role and actually take care of our guests, and we can teach them the grocery industry," Lowe said.
retailers  grocery  supermarkets  branding  Lowes_Foods  digital_media  shopping_experience  web_video  contra-Amazon  experiential_marketing  e-commerce  Amazon  Disney  theme_parks  in-store 
july 2014 by jerryking
Can America Learn to Love Misshapen Veggies? - Elizabeth Segran - The Atlantic
ELIZABETH SEGRAN | JUL 1 2014 |

Daily Table, a grocery store he is launching this fall in Roxbury, a low-income Boston suburb. Rauch plans to salvage food discarded by supermarkets and sell it at very low cost to consumers who would not otherwise have the means to adequately feed themselves. If this experiment works, he plans to open stores like it around the country.

The main challenge in this endeavor involves acquiring nearly expired produce and circumventing legal restrictions against selling it after its expiration date.
grocery  supermarkets  fresh_produce  entrepreneur  start_ups  Trader_Joe's  product_launches 
july 2014 by jerryking
Discount wars push Canada’s mid-priced grocery stores upscale - The Globe and Mail
MARINA STRAUSS - RETAILING REPORTER
MISSISSAUGA — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Apr. 15 2014,
supermarkets  grocery  retailers  Loblaws  Longo  Whole_Foods  gourmands  gourmet  foodies  Eataly 
june 2014 by jerryking
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