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jerryking : surveillance   47

Opinion | Dealing With China Isn’t Worth the Moral Cost
Oct. 9, 2019 | The New York Times | By Farhad Manjoo.

We thought economic growth and technology would liberate China. Instead, it corrupted us.

The People’s Republic of China is the largest, most powerful and arguably most brutal totalitarian state in the world. It denies basic human rights to all of its nearly 1.4 billion citizens. There is no freedom of speech, thought, assembly, religion, movement or any semblance of political liberty in China. Under Xi Jinping, “president for life,” the CCP has built the most technologically sophisticated repression machine the world has ever seen. In Xinjiang, in Western China, the government is using technology to mount a cultural genocide against the Muslim Uighur minority that is even more total than the one it carried out in Tibet. Human rights experts say that more than a million people are being held in detention camps in Xinjiang, two million more are in forced “re-education,” and everyone else is invasively surveilled via ubiquitous cameras, artificial intelligence and other high-tech means.

None of this is a secret. Under Xi, China has grown markedly more Orwellian;......Why do we give China a pass? In a word: capitalism. Because for 40 years, the West’s relationship with China has been governed by a strategic error the dimensions of which are only now coming into horrific view.......A parade of American presidents on the left and the right argued that by cultivating China as a market — hastening its economic growth and technological sophistication while bringing our own companies a billion new workers and customers — we would inevitably loosen the regime’s hold on its people....the West’s entire political theory about China has been spectacularly wrong. China has engineered ferocious economic growth in the past half century, lifting hundreds of millions of its citizens out of miserable poverty. But China’s growth did not come at any cost to the regime’s political chokehold....It is also now routinely corrupting the rest of us outside of China......the N.B.A.’s hasty and embarrassing apology this week after Daryl Morey, the Houston Rockets’ general manager, tweeted — and quickly deleted — a message in support of Hong Kong’s protesters......The N.B.A. is far from the first American institution to accede to China’s limits on liberty. Hollywood, large tech companies and a variety of consumer brands — from Delta to Zara — have been more than willing to play ball. The submission is spreading: .....This sort of corporate capitulation is hardly surprising. For Western companies, China is simply too big and too rich a market to ignore, let alone to pressure or to police. .....it will only get worse from here, and we are fools to play this game. There is a school of thought that says America should not think of China as an enemy. With its far larger population, China’s economy will inevitably come to eclipse ours, but that is hardly a mortal threat. In climate change, the world faces a huge collective-action problem that will require global cooperation. According to this view, treating China like an adversary will only frustrate our own long-term goals......this perspective leaves out the threat that greater economic and technological integration with China poses to everyone outside of China. It ignores the ever-steeper capitulation that China requires of its partners. And it overlooks the most important new factor in the Chinese regime’s longevity: the seductive efficiency that technology offers to effect a breathtaking new level of control over its population......Through online surveillance, facial recognition, artificial intelligence and the propagandistic gold mine of social media, China has mobilized a set of tools that allow it to invisibly, routinely repress its citizens and shape political opinion by manipulating their feelings and grievances on just about any controversy.....Chinese-style tech-abetted surveillance authoritarianism could become a template for how much of the world works.
adversaries  artificial_intelligence  authoritarianism  brands  capitalism  capitulation  China  China_rising  Chinese_Communist_Party  climate_change  collective_action  cultural_genocide  decoupling  despots  errors  facial_recognition  Farhad_Manjoo  freedom  Hollywood  Hong_Kong  human_rights  influence  NBA  op-ed  Orwell  propaganda  repression  self-corruption  surveillance  surveillance_state  technology  threats  Tibet  totalitarianism  tyranny  Uyghurs  unintended_consequences  values  Xi_Jinping 
october 2019 by jerryking
Roger McNamee on how to tame Big Tech
February 7, 2019 | Financial Times | Roger McNamee.

Government intervention of this kind is a first step on the path to resolving the privacy issues that result from the architecture, business models and culture of internet platforms. But privacy is not the only problem we must confront. Internet platforms are transforming our economy and culture in unprecedented ways. We do not even have a vocabulary to describe this transformation, which complicates the challenge facing policymakers....Google, Facebook and other internet platforms use data to influence or manipulate users in ways that create economic value for the platform, but not necessarily for the users themselves. In the context of these platforms, users are not the customer. They are not even the product. They are more like fuel.....Google, Facebook and the rest now have economic power on the scale of early 20th-century monopolists such as Standard Oil. What is unprecedented is the political power that internet platforms have amassed — power that they exercise with no accountability or oversight, and seemingly without being aware of their responsibility to society......When capitalism functions properly, government sets and enforces the rules under which businesses and citizens must operate. Today, however, corpor­ations have usurped this role. Code and algorithms have replaced the legal system as the limiter on behaviour. Corporations such as Google and Facebook behave as if they are not accountable to anyone. Google’s seeming disdain for regulation by the EU and Facebook’s violations of the spirit of its agreement with the US FTC over user consent are cases in point......AI promises to be revolutionary. That said, it will not necessarily be a force for good. The problem is the people who create AI. They are human...McNamee recommends two areas of emphasis: regulation and innovation. As for the former, the most important requirement is to create and enforce standards that require new technology to serve the needs of those who use it and society as a whole. ...... The IoT requires our approval. Do not give it until vendors behave responsibly. Demand that policymakers take action to protect public health, democracy, privacy, innovation and the economy.
accountability  Alexa  antitrust  artificial_intelligence  biases  Big_Tech  consent  dark_side  Facebook  Google  Industrial_Internet  monopolies  personal_data  platforms  political_power  privacy  Roger_McNamee  sensors  surveillance  unintended_consequences 
february 2019 by jerryking
‘Businesses Will Not Be Able to Hide’: Spy Satellites May Give Edge From Above
Jan. 24, 2019 | The New York Times | By Cade Metz.

In October, the Chinese province of Guangdong — the manufacturing center on the southern coast that drives 12 percent of the country’s economy — stopped publishing a monthly report on the health of its local factories.

For five consecutive months, this key economic index had shown a drop in factory production as the United States applied billions of dollars in tariffs on Chinese exports. Then, amid an increasingly bitter trade war between the United States and China, the government authorities in Beijing shut the index down.

A small start-up in San Francisco began rebuilding the index, lifting information from photos and infrared images of Guangdong’s factories captured by satellites orbiting overhead. The company, SpaceKnow, is now selling this information to hedge funds, banks and other market traders looking for an edge.

High-altitude surveillance was once the domain of global superpowers. Now, a growing number of start-ups are turning it into a business, aiming to sell insights gleaned from cameras and other sensors installed on small and inexpensive “cube satellites.”..... satellite analysis will ultimately lead to more efficient markets and a better understanding of the global economy.....as well...as a check on the world’s companies and governments....use satellite imagery to track everything from illegal mining and logging operations to large-scale home demolitions. .....All of this is being driven by a drop in the cost of building, launching and operating satellites. Today, a $3 million satellite that weighs less than 10 pounds can capture significantly sharper images than a $300 million, 900-pound satellite built in the late 1990s. That allows companies to put up dozens of devices, each of which can focus on a particular area of the globe or on a particular kind of data collection. As a result, more companies are sending more satellites into orbit, and these satellites are generating more data.

And recent advances in artificial intelligence allow machines to analyze this data with greater speed and accuracy. “The future is automation, with humans only looking at the very interesting stuff,” ......The start-ups buy their data from a growing number of satellite operators, and they build the automated systems that analyze the data, pinpointing objects like cars, buildings, mines and oil tankers in high-resolution photos and other images........What began with satellite cameras is rapidly expanding to infrared sensors that detect heat; “hyperspectral” sensors that identify minerals, vegetation and other materials; and radar scanners that can build three-dimensional images of the landscape below.....
artificial_intelligence  automation  competitive_advantage  indices  imagery  informational_advantages  infrared  insights  reconnaissance  satellites  sensors  slight_edge  surveillance  trade_wars 
january 2019 by jerryking
Your Apps Know Where You Were Last Night, and They’re Not Keeping It Secret
DEC. 10, 2018 | The New York Times | By JENNIFER VALENTINO-DeVRIES, NATASHA SINGER, MICHAEL H. KELLER and AARON KROLIK.
location_based_services  mobile_applications  mobile_phones  privacy  surveillance  tracking 
december 2018 by jerryking
Computer vision: how Israel’s secret soldiers drive its tech success
November 20, 2018 | Financial Times | Mehul Srivastava in Tel Aviv.
.... those experiences that have helped such a tiny country become a leader in one of the most promising frontiers in the technology world: computer vision. Despite the unwieldy name it is an area that has come of age in the past few years, covering applications across dozens of industries that have one thing in common: the need for computers to figure out what their cameras are seeing, and for those computers to tell them what to do next.........Computer vision has become the connecting thread between some of Israel’s most valuable and promising tech companies. And unlike Israel’s traditional strengths— cyber security and mapping — computer vision slides into a broad range of different civilian industries, spawning companies in agriculture, medicine, sports, self-driving cars, the diamond industry and even shopping. 

In Israel, this lucrative field has benefited from a large pool of engineers and entrepreneurs trained for that very task in an elite, little-known group in the military — Unit 9900 — where they fine-tuned computer algorithms to digest millions of surveillance photos and sift out actionable intelligence. .........The full name for Unit 9900 — the Terrain Analysis, Accurate Mapping, Visual Collection and Interpretation Agency — hints at how it has created a critical mass of engineers indispensable for the future of this industry. The secretive unit has only recently allowed limited discussion of its work. But with an estimated 25,000 graduates, it has created a deep pool of talent that the tech sector has snapped up. 

Soldiers in Unit 9900 are assigned to strip out nuggets of intelligence from the images provided by Israel’s drones and satellites — from surveilling the crowded, chaotic streets of the Gaza Strip to the unending swaths of desert in Syria and the Sinai. 

With so much data to pour over, Unit 9900 came up with solutions, including recruiting Israelis on the autistic spectrum for their analytical and visual skills. In recent years, says Shir Agassi, who served in Unit 9900 for more than seven years, it learned to automate much of the process, teaching algorithms to spot nuances, slight variations in landscapes and how their targets moved and behaved.....“We had to take all these photos, all this film, all this geospatial evidence and break it down: how do you know what you’re seeing, what’s behind it, how will it impact your intelligence decisions?” .....“You’re asking yourself — if you were the enemy, where would you hide? Where are the tall buildings, where’s the element of surprise? Can you drive there, what will be the impact of weather on all this analysis?”

Computer vision was essential to this task....Teaching computers to look for variations allowed the unit to quickly scan thousands of kilometres of background to find actionable intelligence. “You have to find ways not just to make yourself more efficient, but also to find things that the regular eye can’t,” she says. “You need computer vision to answer these questions.”.....The development of massive databases — from close-ups of farm insects to medical scans to traffic data — has given Israeli companies a valuable headstart over rivals. And in an industry where every new image teaches the algorithm something useful, that has made catching up difficult.......“Computer vision is absolutely the thread that ties us to other Israeli companies,” he says. “I need people with the same unique DNA — smart PhDs in mathematics, neural network analysis — to tell a player in the NBA how to improve his jump shot.”
Israel  cyber_security  hackers  cyber_warfare  dual-use  Israeli  security_&_intelligence  IDF  computer_vision  machine_learning  Unit_9900  start_ups  gene_pool  imagery  algorithms  actionable_information  geospatial  mapping  internal_systems  PhDs  drones  satellites  surveillance  autism 
november 2018 by jerryking
Are you mentally prepared for a cyber attack?
JULY 5, 2017 | FT | by Madhumita Murgia.

“Cyber attacks are not benign. Even when no one suffers physical harm, the opportunity to cause anxiety and stress, instil fear and disrupt everyday life is immense,”.......journalists write about how companies and governments struggle to cope with the fallout from a cyber attack, but the longer-lasting impact on the human psyche has remained largely unexplored. Clearly, the anxiety prompted by cyber attacks is different from that associated with “traditional” acts of terrorism that cause deaths and injury to civilians. .... “Our analysis suggests that the psychological harm of cyber war can affect wellbeing nonetheless.” Identity theft, online threats of personal harm and the disclosure of confidential data such as medical records can cause significant distress........
........Samir Kapuria, a senior executive at Symantec, a global cyber-security company, is at the frontline of damage control, often helping clients after a cyber crime. He admitted that the corporate world was “in a state of urgency” when it came to dealing with the scale and virality of cyber attacks.

“The early 2000s was an era of mass cyber crime, when viruses like Stuxnet were released to disrupt with criminal intent. Today, with attacks like WannaCry and Petya, we are entering the era of intelligence,” says Kapuria, “moving from locks to surveillance to early detection.”
cyber_security  hackers  cyberthreats  malware  cyberattacks  psychology  panic  viruses  security_&_intelligence  Symantec  identity_theft  left_of_the_boom  surveillance  human_psyche  stressful  disaster_preparedness 
may 2018 by jerryking
The Fast Lane: Revisiting last year’s promises
DECEMBER 30, 2016 by: Tyler Brûlé

The BBC’s Allan Little had a decent mini-doc on the shifting political sentiment of the past year but beyond that there’s been little in the way of compelling viewing. Most newsrooms felt like they had already switched off the lights and left the interns in charge when Berlin was attacked. There was little context and not nearly enough smart analysis of Germany’s stiflingly bureaucratic security apparatus. For days anchors were asking guests “how could this happen” when a sharp security correspondent could have told everyone from day one that Germany’s matrix of states mixed with federal agencies makes for a messy mélange when it comes to intelligence-sharing, surveillance and enforcement.
resolutions  contextual  security_&_intelligence  Germany  Tyler_Brûlé  surveillance  enforcement 
january 2017 by jerryking
The Apple Case Will Grope Its Way Into Your Future - The New York Times
Farhad Manjoo
STATE OF THE ART FEB. 24, 2016

In an Internet of Things world, every home appliance could be turned into a listening post. That’s why the Apple case matters. ... controversy over whether Apple should be forced to unlock an iPhone
Apple  FBI  privacy  Industrial_Internet  connected_devices  Farhad_Manjoo  home_appliances  encryption  surveillance  civil_liberties  cryptography  iPhone 
february 2016 by jerryking
U.S. Surveillance on Island Reveals Chinese Arms - WSJ
By JULIAN E. BARNES in Washington and GORDON LUBOLD in Singapore
Updated May 28, 2015
China  maritime  South_China_Sea  surveillance  security_&_intelligence 
may 2015 by jerryking
Street savvy: A look at how Toronto’s traffic nerve centre really manages our roads - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 27 2015,

As drivers wrestle with congestion on roads across Toronto, staff at the city’s Traffic Management Centre swing into action when anything goes wrong. Far from the public gaze, they dispatch response teams, warn drivers and, in some cases, fiddle with traffic signals to manage the flow better.

This real-time effort to monitor and relieve Toronto’s increasingly clogged streets is run by a small team in a nondescript Don Mills office building.
traffic_congestion  Toronto  surveillance  real-time  digital_savvy 
march 2015 by jerryking
U.S. Scurries to Shore Up Spying on Russia - WSJ
By ADAM ENTOUS, JULIAN E. BARNES and SIOBHAN GORMAN CONNECT
Updated March 24, 2014

There were no Americans on the ground in Crimea to check reports of Russian military movements, U.S. officials say. The U.S. also didn't have drones overhead to gather real-time intelligence, officials say. That increased the U.S.'s reliance on satellite imagery and information gleaned from an analysis of social media, which was muddled by Russian disinformation. State Department officials declined to discuss any technical-intelligence activities.

If Mr. Putin decided to launch a takeover, many U.S. intelligence analysts thought he would use troops participating in the military exercises. Officials now say they underestimated the quality of Russian forces inside Crimea....U.S. military officials also made urgent calls to their counterparts in Russia. Not surprisingly, Russian military officials offered little information. Some of them claimed to be surprised. "It was classic maskirovka," says a senior U.S. official, using the Russian word for camouflage. Spies use the word to describe Moscow's tradition of sophisticated deception tactics.
espionage  surveillance  sigint  Russia  Crimea  imagery  satellites  security_&_intelligence  warning_signs  Vladimir_Putin  disinformation  camouflage  deception  intelligence_analysts 
november 2014 by jerryking
Nathan Wolfe: No More Ebola Whac-A-Mole - WSJ - WSJ
By NATHAN WOLFE
Oct. 13, 2014 7:04

Ebola is not the first virus to threaten the world, and it won’t be the last. Stopping the current epidemic is vital, but the world can’t afford to go to sleep after it is stopped. Unless we prepare for the next epidemic, we will find ourselves forever nailing down outbreaks just in time to see the next ones pop up.
disease_surveillance  Ebola  pandemics  interconnections  zoonotic  flu_outbreaks  epidemics  Congo  viruses  disease  surveillance  preparation  disaster_preparedness 
october 2014 by jerryking
China's Spy Agency Has Broad Reach - WSJ
By JAMES T. AREDDY in Shanghai, PAUL MOZUR in Beijing and DANNY YADRON in San Francisco CONNECT
July 7, 2014
China  security_&_intelligence  sigint  PLA  surveillance  3PLA  cyber_warfare 
august 2014 by jerryking
The Economics of Surveillance - Digits - WSJ
Sep 28, 2012 | WSJ | By Jennifer Valentino-DeVries.

surveillance has crept into people’s lives gradually as computers have become more efficient and cheaper – and as data analysis has become more enticing. The price for businesses to store and use a gigabyte of information for a year dropped from $18.95 in 2005 to $1.68 in 2012, and it’s expected to drop to just 66 cents in 2015, says market research firm IDC....The average price of a cellphone has increased 17% over the past 10 years – but processing capability has increased by 13,000% in that same time, ABI says. This allows phones to do things such as shoot video, get email and locate the user on a map, but it also means the devices store a lot of information about people that can be collected and tracked.

“Nowadays cellphones are sensors,” said says Col. Lisa Shay, a professor of electrical engineering at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point who studies tracking technology. “You’re now carrying a personal sensor with you at all times.”
surveillance  massive_data_sets  privacy  data  sensors  digital_storage  economics  West_Point 
january 2014 by jerryking
New Tracking Frontier: Your License Plates - WSJ.com
September 29, 2012 | WSJ | By Julia Angwin and Jennifer Valentino-DeVries.

The rise of license-plate tracking is a case study in how storing and studying people's everyday activities, even the seemingly mundane, has become the default rather than the exception. Cellphone-location data, online searches, credit-card purchases, social-network comments and more are gathered, mixed-and-matched, and stored in vast databases.....License-plate databases contain revealing information about people's locations. Police can generally obtain it without a judge's approval. By comparison, prosecutors typically get a court order to install GPS trackers on people's cars or to track people's location via cellphone.

License-plate databases don't contain names and addresses of vehicle owners, although that information is available from separate state Department of Motor Vehicle databases.

Data about a typical American is collected in more than 20 different ways during everyday activities, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis.
GPS  location_based_services  massive_data_sets  mobile_phones  privacy  surveillance  tracking 
january 2014 by jerryking
Traders Seek an Edge With High-Tech Snooping - WSJ.com
Dec. 18, 2013 | WSJ | By Michael Rothfeld and Scott Patterson.

A growing industry uses surveillance and data-crunching technology to supply traders with nonpublic information.

Genscape's clients include banks such as Goldman Sachs Group Inc., J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. and Deutsche Bank AG, hedge funds including Citadel LLC and large energy-trading outfits such as Trafigura Beheer BV. Surveillance and analysis of the oil, electricity and natural-gas sectors can run Genscape clients more than $300,000 a year.
surveillance  data_driven  slight_edge  traders  hedge_funds  sleuthing  Genscape  sensors  commodities  corporate_espionage  competitive_intelligence  scuttlebutt  due_diligence  market_research  exclusivity  investment_research  research_methods  LBMA  nonpublic  primary_field_research  banks  Citadel  oil_industry  natural_gas  snooping  alternative_data  informational_advantages  imagery  satellites  infrared  electric_power 
december 2013 by jerryking
FBI’s search for ‘Mo,’ suspect in bomb threats, highlights use of malware for surveillance - The Washington Post
FBI’s search for ‘Mo,’ suspect in bomb threats, highlights use of malware for surveillance
By Craig Timberg and Ellen Nakashima, Published: December 6
FBI  surveillance  malware 
december 2013 by jerryking
Eyes Everywhere
Autumn 2013 | University of Toronto Magazine |By Scott Anderson
NSA  security_&_intelligence  uToronto  CSE  surveillance  sigint 
november 2013 by jerryking
Obama calls Hollande as U.S. spy scandal widens to include France - The Globe and Mail
DEB RIECHMANN and KIMBERLY DOZIER

WASHINGTON — The Associated Press

Published Monday, Oct. 21 2013,

U.S. President Barack Obama called French President François Hollande on Monday and discussed France’s anger over reported aggressive surveillance tactics by the National Security Agency...Keeping tabs on allies is classic spy craft but the sweep and scope of the NSA program have irritated Germany, Britain, Brazil, and most recently Mexico and France....The report in Le Monde, co-written by Glenn Greenwald, who originally revealed the surveillance program based on leaks from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, found that when certain numbers were used, the conversations were automatically recorded. The surveillance operation also swept up text messages based on key words, Le Monde reported, based on records from Dec. 10 to Jan 7.

The French government, which wants the surveillance to cease, also renewed demands for talks on protection of personal data.
Obama  espionage  security_&_intelligence  NSA  sigint  France  French  surveillance  spycraft  eavesdropping 
october 2013 by jerryking
L. Gordon Crovitz: White Hats vs. Black Hats - WSJ.com
August 4, 2013 | WSJ | By L. GORDON CROVITZ.

The NSA says 42 terror-related plots have been disrupted, thanks to its surveillance program.

In the language of computer hacking, the good guys are "white hats," who identify weaknesses in systems so they can be fixed. "Black hats" are the ones who take advantage of weaknesses in systems.......A white-hat hacker would point out what happens when intelligence agencies fail to monitor communications data. Gen. Alexander pointed out that the 9/11 plots succeeded because of avoidable intelligence failures, citing the example of an intercept of a phone call from Yemen involving one of the 9/11 hijackers. "We didn't have the tools and capabilities to see that he was actually in California," Gen. Alexander said. "The intelligence community failed to connect those dots."
black_hats  NSA  security_&_intelligence  surveillance  9/11  privacy  L._Gordon_Crovtiz  terrorism  U.S._Cyber_Command  connecting_the_dots  white_hats 
august 2013 by jerryking
Who's watching whom?
January 25, 2013 | Report on Business Magazine |Tim Kiladze
The video surveillance industry was caught flat-footed when Vancouver-based Avigilon introduced its high-definition digital technology
security_&_intelligence  video  Avigilon  surveillance  start_ups  security 
january 2013 by jerryking
Two South African Defense Firms Take Aim at Niche Aircraft Market - WSJ.com
SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 | WSJ | By PATRICK MCGROARTY in Centurion, South Africa and DANIEL MICHAELS in Brussels
aerospace  South_Africa  Africa  surveillance  reconnaissance  aircraft  security_&_intelligence  militaries 
september 2011 by jerryking
FBI's 'Stingray' Cellphone Tracker Stirs a Fight Over Search Warrants, Fourth Amendment - WSJ.com
Sept. 22, 2011 WS By JENNIFER VALENTINO-DEVRIES. Stingrays are
designed to locate a mobile phone even when it's not being used to make
a call. The FBI considers the devices to be so critical that it has a
policy of deleting the data gathered in their use, mainly to keep
suspects in the dark about their capabilities, an FBI official told The
Wall Street Journal in response to inquiries.
FBI  surveillance  mobile_phones  location  privacy 
september 2011 by jerryking
Leading His Troops by Example - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 7, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By DUNCAN MAVIN.
NYSE-listed China Security & Surveillance Technology Inc., based in
Shenzhen, China, manufactures and installs surveillance and security
equipment—cameras, alarm systems, thermal-imaging equipment, for
example—for corporate clients in China and Chinese government
organizations. It also offers a range of security support services, such
as monitoring and training services.

The private security industry is growing fast in China and is already
worth tens of billions of dollars by most estimates. CSST's revenue has
risen from $32.7 million in 2005 to $580.9 million last year. The
company estimates that 2010 will see the top line increase by as much as
30%. Founded in 2001, CSST has also gone through 16 acquisitions in the
past five years.
Asian  security_&_intelligence  security  Singapore  China  Lee_Kuan_Yew  surveillance  CFOs 
november 2010 by jerryking
New approaches to quantifying the spread of infect... [Nat Rev Microbiol. 2005] - PubMed result
Traditional approaches to mathematical modelling of infectious
diseases deal most effectively with large outbreaks in large
populations. The desire to elucidate the highly variable dynamics of
disease spread amongst small numbers of individuals has fuelled the
development of models that depend more directly on surveillance and
contact-tracing data. This signals a move towards a closer interplay
between epidemiological modelling, surveillance and disease-management
strategies.
models  mathematics  surveillance  disease  disease_surveillance  market_segmentation  size  flu_outbreaks  epidemiology  infections 
march 2010 by jerryking

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