recentpopularlog in

jerryking : symbolism   38

Opinion | Why Did U.N.C. Give Millions to a Neo-Confederate Group? - The New York Times
By William Sturkey
Dr. Sturkey is an assistant professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dec. 3, 2019,
Colleges_&_Universities  history  symbolism  the_South 
11 weeks ago by jerryking
The Free-Form Funeral - WSJ
By Clare Ansberry
March 2, 2019 11:00 a.m. ET

There are new ways to say goodbye.

While many still turn to the funeral rites that have comforted generations, others, led by baby boomers, are taking a different approach than their parents and grandparents. They are instead choosing individualized and symbolic memorials: a party with a punk-rock band for a tattoo artist, or a gathering at an airport hangar for the devoted mechanic.

“It’s more about a life lived than a ritual of religion,” says Jimmy Olson, a spokesperson for the National Funeral Directors Association.

A changing society is fueling this trend. Nearly a quarter of adults in the U.S. aren’t affiliated with any organized religion, according to a 2014 report from the Pew Research Center. A rise in cremations, which now outnumber burials, gives leeway on when and where to hold memorials. Although there are some laws about where ashes can be scattered, many people spread them surreptitiously in especially meaningful places. In the past year, more than half of around 1,000 people surveyed had attended a memorial in a non-traditional place—in a backyard, atop a mountain, aboard a boat—according to the NFDA.
farewells  free-form  funerals  memorials  nontraditional  symbolism 
march 2019 by jerryking
The GE-free Dow is the index our age deserves | Financial Times
Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson 8 HOURS AGO

The avatar of American agglomeration is now slimming down to its aviation, healthcare and power businesses. Yet if you ask anyone who grew up around American kitchens or hardware stores what GE makes, they will probably mention fridges and lightbulbs. As its new chief, John Flannery, struggles to reverse the third steep slide in GE’s shares since the start of the century, one challenge he faces is that its brand is freighted with misconceptions. 
...The Dow tracks a mere 30 stocks, compared to the S&P’s 500; the points moves get increasingly meaningless as markets rise, and with no Facebook, Amazon, Netflix or Google it is missing most of the market-moving Faangs.
.......What earned GE its special place in the American imagination is that, in its conglomerate prime, it provided a similar guide to the US’s industrial evolution as it diversified from jet engines to television shows to finance. Even now, the company is as much a bet on healthcare.... as Walgreens,
........the Dow is as much a branding triumph as a GE fridge, and the story it tells best about the US economy is how it has come to be driven by brands........The market-movers of 1896 had solid, descriptive and quietly flag-waving names like Standard Rope & Twine, Pacific Mail Steamship and the North American Company. Today’s biggest businesses, like Apple, Alphabet and Amazon, are not defined by history, geography or even what they do. Instead, they stand as testaments to the rise of intangible assets at the expense of tangible goods — as does the survival of a well-marketed industrial average in a country where services are 80 per cent of GDP. 

The Dow no longer tells us much about American industry. But it still tells us plenty about America.
benchmarks  brands  conglomerates  DJIA  exits  FAANG  GE  indignities  intangibles  misconceptions  symbolism  indices  healthcare 
june 2018 by jerryking
Who we choose to remember – and who we let history forget – defines us
September 2, 2017 | The Globe and Mail | ELIZABETH RENZETTI.

An elegant monument to one of the town's great entrepreneurs, a black Loyalist named Rose Fortune.

A freed slave who had arrived with her family in Nova Scotia just before the American War of Independence, Rose became a famous figure in town, using her wheelbarrow to help transport travellers' goods from the wharves to their lodgings. She is also often referred to as the country's first unofficial policewoman, as she enthusiastically applied her baton to keep local rowdy teens in line. Her business grew and prospered, and she became the matriarch of a Nova Scotia transport dynasty. On July 1 this year, Rose's monument, a metal sculpture that also functions as a bench, designed by artist Brad Hall, was unveiled in the garrison graveyard.........
Elizabeth_Renzetti  symbolism  Nova_Scotia  forgotten  African_Canadians  women  history 
september 2017 by jerryking
In 1967, the birth of modern Canada - The Globe and Mail
JAN. 02, 2017 | THE GLOBE AND MAIL | DOUG SAUNDERS |

1967 is the hinge upon which modern Canadian history turns and, in certain respects, the key to understanding the challenges of the next half-century.

Today, we live in the country shaped by the decisions and transformations of 1967, far more than by the events of 1867.

Let me make the case, then, that 1967 was Canada’s first good year. We should spend this year celebrating not the 150 th year of Confederation, but the 50th birthday of the new Canada.

But let me also make the case that our conventional story about the birth of second-century Canada is largely wrong. We like to believe that starting in the late 1960s, a series of political decisions, parliamentary votes, court rulings and royal commissions descended upon an innocent, paternalistic, resource-economy Canada and forced upon it an awkward jumble of novelties: non-white immigration, bilingualism, multiculturalism, refugees, indigenous nationhood, liberation of women and gays, the seeds of free trade, individual rights, religious diversity.

But the explosions of official novelty that were launched in and around 1967 weren’t a cause; they were an effect of profound changes that had taken place in Canadians themselves during the two decades after the war, in their thinking and their composition and their attitude toward their country, in Quebec and English Canada and in indigenous communities.


There is a solid line leading from the events of 1967 to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in 1982: It was impossible to have a Canada of multiple peoples, as we discovered was necessary in the late 1960s, without having a Canada of individual people and their rights.

....Individual rights, Quebecois consciousness, indigenous shared-sovereignty status and cultural plurality weren’t the only inevitable outcomes of the 1967 moment. What Canada witnessed over the next two decades was a self-reinforcing spiral of events that often sprung directly from the centennial-era awakening of a postcolonial consciousness.
Doug_Saunders  anniversaries  1967  nostalgia  nationalism  '60s  turning_points  centenaries  pride  Pierre_Berton  Canada  Canada150  national_identity  aboriginals  postcolonial  symbolism  John_Diefenbaker  Lester_Pearson  multiculturalism  Quebecois  Quiet_Revolution  monoculturalism  land_claim_settlements  immigration  royal_commissions  sesquicentennial  Charter_of_Rights_and_Freedoms  Confederation  retrospectives 
january 2017 by jerryking
When an athlete protests by sitting out the anthem - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Sep. 09, 2016

The 49ers organization issued a statement supporting both the playing of The Star-Spangled Banner and Mr. Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for it. It called the anthem “an opportunity to honour our country and reflect on the great liberties we are afforded as citizens. In respecting such American principles as freedom of religion and freedom of expression, we recognize the right of an individual to choose and participate, or not, in our celebration of the national anthem.”

This is sensible. But it is hardly legally required. If the league or his team had wanted to, they could have disciplined him. They didn’t, and they shouldn’t – but their decision to tolerate and even to some extent back him, rather than dropping him, has been a business decision, not a legal or constitutional one.

Americans, like Canadians, enjoy something approaching an absolute right to free speech. But that right, the most fundamental of citizen’s rights in Western democracies, is about being able to speak without the government censoring you. It’s not the right to say anything you want, anywhere and any time, without consequences.
African-Americans  athletes_&_athletics  NFL  symbolism  black_lives_matter  protests 
september 2016 by jerryking
What O.J. Simpson Taught Me About Being Black - The New York Times
By JOHN McWHORTER FEB. 3, 2016

The [O.J. Simpson} case was about much more than bloody gloves and bloody footprints. It was about the centrality of police brutality to black Americans’ very sense of self....After a while I realized that the rub was that my life had spared me from experiencing or even seeing police abuse. ...what prevents real racial conciliation and understanding in America is the poisonous relations between blacks and the police.....Many non-black Americans who were disgusted by the Simpson verdict have become more aware of the ubiquity of police brutality in black lives.
African-Americans  John_McWhorter  O.J._Simpson  police_misconduct  '90s  identity  celebrities  symbolism  race  criminal_justice_system  police_brutality 
february 2016 by jerryking
Slowly, new attitudes taking root across America’s Old South - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
Slowly, new attitudes taking root across America’s Old South
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Sep. 01, 2015
Marcus_Gee  the_South  race_relations  Civil_War  racism  slavery  South_Carolina  race  Confederacy  symbolism  flags  Charleston_shootings 
september 2015 by jerryking
Confederate Memorials as Instruments of Racial Terror - The New York Times
JULY 24, 2015 | NYT | By BRENT STAPLES.

In the wake of the Charleston massacre, for example, the parks and recreation board of Birmingham, Ala., voted to explore a proposal that would remove a 52-foot Confederate memorial from the entrance of a prominent park and place it with a Confederate heritage group.

Not all monuments warrant that kind of challenge. But those honoring the Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest deserve the backlash they have generated. Forrest presided over the 1864 massacre of Union soldiers, many of them black, at Fort Pillow in Tennessee. He was also a prominent slave trader and served as the first grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan.

Apologists argue that his involvement with the Klan was unimportant because he later adopted more enlightened views. But as the Forrest biographer Jack Hurst writes, by lending his name to the K.K.K. even temporarily, the general accelerated its development. “As the Klan’s first national leader,” Mr. Hurst writes, “he became the Lost Cause’s avenging angel, galvanizing a loose collection of boyish secret social clubs into a reactionary instrument of terror still feared today.”....Critics predictably condemn these efforts as bad-faith attempts to rewrite history. But what’s happening is that communities that were once bound and gagged on this issue are now free to contest a version of history that was created to reinforce racial subjugation.

They are reflecting on how to honor history — including the neglected history of African-Americans — and rightly deciding that some figures who were enshrined as heroes in the past do not deserve to be valorized in public places.
the_South  KKK  Confederacy  terrorism  white_supremacy  history  symbolism  race  African-Americans  Charleston_shootings  Reconstruction  race_relations  racial_discrimination  racial_segregation  racism  violence  Jim_Crow  race-baiting 
july 2015 by jerryking
Lowering of Confederate flag marks both an end and a beginning - The Globe and Mail
Omar El Akkad
Lowering of Confederate flag marks both an end and a beginning
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 10, 2015
flags  symbolism  Charleston_shootings  the_South  Confederacy  Omar_el_Akkad  slavery 
july 2015 by jerryking
The Right Way to Remember the Confederacy
In June of 1865, Confederate Gen. Joseph Shelby and about a thousand of his cavalrymen rode into Mexico and exile rather than remain in a conquered South. As they forded the Rio Grande, they stopped…
secession  slavery  the_South  Confederacy  Civil_War  flags  symbolism  white_supremacy  Charleston_shootings 
july 2015 by jerryking
Divisive questions: Remove Confederate monuments or use them to educate?
Just down the road from the church where a racist gunman killed nine people last month stands a tall column in a grassy square. Atop it stands an imperious figure with a cape over his shoulders, a…
racism  slavery  South_Carolina  race  Confederacy  symbolism  flags  Marcus_Gee  the_South 
july 2015 by jerryking
The Robert E. Lee Problem - The New York Times
JUNE 26, 2015
Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

David Brooks
the_South  David_Brooks  Confederacy  treason  flags  symbolism  racism 
june 2015 by jerryking
Confederate flag supporters are suddenly in full retreat
Arthur Ravenel, Jr., was a significant enough figure in South Carolina politics to have a bridge named after him. The sweeping eight-lane structure links downtown Charleston with the suburb of Mount…
racism  flags  symbolism  Nikki_Haley  South_Carolina  Confederacy  the_South 
june 2015 by jerryking
Alabama governor compares Confederate battle flag to swastika
By MIKE ISAAC JULY 6 2015
The Confederate flag flew high Wednesday outside the South Carolina Statehouse, but a large drape kept mourners from seeing it as they filed past the open casket of a veteran black lawmaker and…
Columbia  South_Carolina  Nikki_Haley  flags  symbolism  Charleston_shootings  the_South  Confederacy 
june 2015 by jerryking
Chilliwack artist celebrates flag's 50th - Chilliwack Times
by  Greg Laychak - Chilliwack Times
posted Feb 5, 2015 at 4:00 PM
art  artists  Canadian  inspiration  symbolism  flags 
february 2015 by jerryking
Hidden gems
Apr 12th 2014 | The Economist | Schumpeter.

Reviving old brands sometimes makes more sense than creating new ones.

companies often discard brands that contain plenty of what marketers call “equity”. In plain English, ones that people still remember fondly. Healthy brands can be sacrificed on the altars of corporate takeovers and restructurings....The second reason is that reviving an old brand often beats spending months and millions on creating a new one, with a lower risk of failure. If something has worked before there is a good chance that it will work again. Old brands come with ready-made logos, slogans, jingles and memories.
brand_equity  brands  branding  orphan_brands  rejuvenation  goodwill  symbolism  jingles  logos  slogans  memories  culling 
april 2014 by jerryking
Confederate flag ugly symbol of human bondage that should not be used - The Globe and Mail
March 7, 2013 | Globe & Mail
The flag of the Confederate States during the American Civil War has been the subject of recent controversy in two places in Ontario. Though it should not be prohibited as hate speech, Canadians should not regard the flag as a harmless cultural symbol. There would have been no such Confederacy and no such emblem if slavery had not existed in the southern United States. What some Southerners euphemistically called the “peculiar institution” was at the very core of the war.

In Hamilton, a two-location barbecue restaurant called Hillbilly Heaven displays the Confederate flag, giving offence to many in an area that was a leading destination for escaped slaves on the Underground Railroad. And in Sutton, Ont., on Lake Simcoe, the local high school has banned the use of the same flag on its premises; many students had adopted it by association with country and western music.

Hillbilly Heaven should be allowed to use the Confederate flag, just as people should be free not to eat there. The school is another matter; a public institution should not condone an expression of racism and human bondage on its grounds.
the_South  slavery  Ontario  high_schools  restaurants  Confederacy  symbolism  Civil_War 
march 2013 by jerryking
Coalition to build its own 1823 monument – Nigel Hughes
January 6, 2013 | Stabroek News |

Last week, ACDA, the All African Guyanese Council, the Pan-African Movement, the African Welfare Council, the Guyana Institute of Historical Research, and the People’s Parliament announced the formation of a coalition to establish the 1823 monument in its rightful place, dubbing the planned location disrespectful to African ancestors.
Afro-Guyanese  Guyana  slavery  memorials  history  ACDA  symbolism 
january 2013 by jerryking
The Puzzle of Black Republicans - NYTimes.com
By ADOLPH L. REED Jr.
Published: December 18, 2012

Even if the Republicans managed to distance themselves from the thinly veiled racism of the Tea Party adherents who have moved the party rightward, they wouldn’t do much better among black voters than they do now. I suspect that appointments like Mr. Scott’s are directed less at blacks — whom they know they aren’t going to win in any significant numbers — than at whites who are inclined to vote Republican but don’t want to have to think of themselves, or be thought of by others, as racist....The trope of the black conservative has retained a man-bites-dog newsworthiness that is long past its shelf life. Clichés about fallen barriers are increasingly meaningless; symbols don’t make for coherent policies. Republicans will not gain significant black support unless they take policy positions that advance black interests. No number of Tim Scotts — or other cynical tokens — will change that.
African-Americans  GOP  symbolism 
december 2012 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read