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jerryking : systemic_discrimination   11

My time on The Apprentice taught me a lot about black men in business
Fri 1 Nov 2019 | The Guardian | by Samuel Brooksworth.

There is a lack of black men in senior positions. We need to tackle the discrimination that is holding so many people back
Black_British  FTSE_100     men  race  racial_discrimination  reality_tv  start_ups  systemic_discrimination  under-representation  United_Kingdom 
november 2019 by jerryking
We need to talk about the boys -
MAY 5, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | MARGARET WENTE.

It’s girls who get all the attention these days. But it’s the boys we should be worried about. Boys lag girls in school at every level. They drop out, get in trouble with the law, and become disconnected from the mainstream – sometimes for good.

Jamil Jivani was heading there himself. He grew up in Brampton, Ont....At age 16, he couldn’t read – or didn’t care enough to. He was convinced the system was rigged against him. His role models were gansta rappers. Police officers gave him a hard time. His dad wasn’t in the picture.....Mr. Jivani is now 30. He is a law professor, a graduate of Yale, and an activist for disadvantaged communities. His personal story is the powerful thread running through his new book, Why Young Men: Rage, Race and the Crisis of Identity......He aims to change the conversation from “either/or” to “and also.” “If you’re trying to change the conditions young men grow up in,” he says, “you need to talk about both law enforcement and families.”

He gets pushback saying things like that. “People are used to hearing a certain kind of narrative – the world is unfair, racist, biased, and the primary concern we should have is that these are systems that oppress us – systemic racism, sexism, and so on. It’s amazing how much this passes as a truth.”

Mr. Jivani believes that we can’t address the crisis of young men without talking about families and culture. For boys, fathers are their first line of defence. Without fathers, they may have no positive role models for how to be a man.

“A lot of people in the black community want to talk about fatherlessness,” he says. But we seldom hear from them. The voices you hear are all from one side, and the media seldom seek out any other perspectives.

People censor themselves too. “..... Black Lives Matter makes things worse. “It’s a style of activism that tries to define people – to tell them this is what you’re supposed to think and do because of your identity.” ....“BLM’s approach to activism focuses on having an enemy that must be defeated,” he writes. “It is accusatory at its core.”
Margaret_Wente  fatherhood  parenting  dysfunction  Black_Lives_Matter  African_Canadians  books  crisis  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  lawyers  Osgoode  family_breakdown  values  dropouts  achievement_gaps  Yale  activism  economically_disadvantaged  victimhood 
may 2018 by jerryking
No Racial Barrier Left to Break (Except All of Them) - The New York Times
JAN. 14, 2017 | NYT | By KHALIL GIBRAN MUHAMMAD.

The future is no longer about “firsts.” It is instead about the content of the character of the institutions our new leaders will help us rebuild....The U.S. can’t create a more just nation simply by dressing up institutions in more shades of brown. Now there must be an effort to confront structural racism.....for African-Americans, Obama's travails are proof positive that MLK's contention that the content of one’s character would be the perfect antidote to racism is necessary but--by itself--insufficient to heal the gaping wounds of racial injustice in America.....in a post-assimilation America where there is no racial [occupational] barrier left to break, [African] Americans must turn to confronting structural racism and the values of our institutions....Obama's pedigree and character couldn’t protect/save him from the Tea Party revolution, Republican obstructionism, police brutality, voter suppression and Islamophobia.... individuals, no matter how singular, cannot bend the moral arc of the universe....In a post-assimilation America, recognize that institutions are far more powerful than individuals, no matter how many people of color can be counted in leadership. Structural racism is immune to identity politics....history matters. Black people in charge of, or embedded in, institutions that have not atoned for their history of racism can make it easier for those institutions to ignore or dismiss present-day claims of racial bias. That’s because the path to leadership has often meant accepting institutions as they are, not disrupting them.....people of color can inherit or perpetuate structures of inequality. Many institutions of government, finance and higher education were built on the backs of enslaved African-Americans and remain haunted by that history. Diversity and inclusion policies, therefore, should grow out of truth and reconciliation practices as well as strategic hiring plans. Intentional transformation, even reparations, one government agency, one company, one college at a time moves us past the denial and the empty promises....In post-assimilation America, people of color must continue to pursue leadership roles as the demographics of the nation inexorably change. But they must also reject their personal achievement as the core measure of progress and instead use history as a tool to measure systemic change.
African-Americans  assimilation  farewells  Georgetown_University  GOP  history  identity_politics  institutions  institutional_change  institutional_path_dependency  leaders  legacies  MLK  Obama  obstructionism  reconciliation  structural_change  systemic_change  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  Tea_Party 
january 2017 by jerryking
Why black Canadians are facing U.S.-style problems - The Globe and Mail
DOUG SAUNDERS
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jul. 16, 2016

What’s the root of this discrimination, which takes place even when officials are racially diverse and liberal-minded? In part, it’s institutional path dependency: Police and judges have always responded to suspects based on traditional patterns (and on patterns learned from the U.S. media and justice system), and it’s hard to break those ugly traditions.

That’s dangerous, because black Canadians are also inordinately excluded from home ownership, neighbourhoods with good public transit and key employment markets. That’s partly due to the timing and economic circumstances of Caribbean immigration, partly due to racism.

Either way, it creates a spiral of discrimination: A group of Canadians who live in fringe rental-only neighbourhoods, with less secure employment and access to resources, who face a more hostile police and justice system, hurting their chances of advancement.
African_Canadians  Canadian  Doug_Saunders  geographic_segregation  racial_disparities  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  racial_discrimination  institutional_path_dependency  exclusion  marginalization 
july 2016 by jerryking
A half-century of progress and black America’s still burning - The Globe and Mail
DOUG SAUNDERS
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, May. 09 2015

When it comes to race relations, America is better than it’s ever been,” the Washington journalist Jamelle Bouie writes. “With that said, we shouldn’t confuse optimism about race relations (or, again, how whites view blacks and other groups) with optimism about racial progress, or how groups fare in relation to each other. There, the news isn’t just bad – it’s bleak.”

Why have the huge improvements in American racial attitudes and general social measures not brought about an improvement in racial equality? Why do police attack and discriminate against black Americans disproportionately – even when, as is the case in Baltimore, most of the police force, its chief, its mayor and its president are African-American?

This is the paradox of the United States today: A population of voters and leaders who have largely moved beyond racial discrimination continue to produce often grotesquely racist results. Why does the reality not change with the attitudes toward it?

The answer is found in the cities and towns where these explosions of violence and deprivation are taking place: Once an institution (a city, a police force, a school system, an economy) is set up to create a racial divide, it will continue to do so, regardless who’s running it, unless there’s a dramatic intervention.
Doug_Saunders  African-Americans  race_relations  institutions  institutional_path_dependency  systemic_discrimination  disproportionality  institutional_racism  deprivations 
may 2015 by jerryking
America’s racial divide widens under Obama’s watch - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, May. 07 2015,

African-Americans are sliding down an economic ladder they had been gradually climbing. Millions of black people who moved north during the Great Migration of the mid-20th century found jobs in bustling factories. Millions more found public-sector jobs – as teachers, postal employees or city workers – as black people took over city governments and congressional seats in places such as Baltimore and Detroit. These workers formed the basis of a black middle class.

But the previous recession hit black people harder than any other group. Manufacturing was shedding jobs before the crash; governments and the post office followed suit when it hit. As Bard College professor Walter Russell Mead has noted, black people accounted for less than 12 per cent of the U.S. work force in 2011, but 21 per cent of postal employees and 20 per cent of all government workers. But with government and manufacturing in retreat, black people faced bleak job prospects.

The new economy is largely a black-free zone. A USA Today analysis last year found that African-Americans occupied only 2 per cent of the jobs at seven big Silicon Valley companies. That’s not hard to understand given the state of public schools in places such as Baltimore, Detroit and Washington, where political nepotism and unions have stood in the way of reform.

Meanwhile, systemic racism in the U.S. criminal justice system – black people are far more likely than white people to be sentenced to jail for minor drug violations, ending up with criminal records that make them virtually unemployable – is so deep as to cry out for a national inquiry.
racial_disparities  Silicon_Valley  Ted_Cruz  Konrad_Yakabuski  Campaign_2016  digital_economy  race_relations  Obama  downward_mobility  African-Americans  public_sector  middle_class  Walter_Russell_Mead  systemic_discrimination  criminal_justice_system  joblessness  public_schools  Great_Migration  sentencing  downward_spirals  institutional_path_dependency 
may 2015 by jerryking
Is the real problem here crime or systemic racism?
May 31, 2005 | G & M |Margaret Wente.

What the study did was record the age, race and gender of everybody stopped by police in the course of a year. What it found was that blacks (who make up only 1 per cent of Kingston's population) are stopped nearly three times as often, per capita, as whites. Therefore, it concluded, the police are racially biased.

But if that's true, then the police are also ageist and sexist. Only 7 per cent of the people stopped by police were 55 or older, while 35 per cent were between 15 and 24. And roughly three times more men were stopped than women. Does this mean the police are also biased against young people and men? Most crimes are committed by young men, and a disproportionate number of crimes are committed by young black men. Only 9 % of Toronto's population is black, but more than half of Toronto's 20 "most wanted" are black.
Margaret_Wente  Toronto  African_Canadians  disproportionality  statistics  Kingston  systemic_discrimination  zero-tolerance  expulsions  high_schools  criminality  Toronto_Police_Service  carding  racial_profiling  racial_disparities  young_people 
september 2012 by jerryking
The need for fathers
Nov 29, 2005 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.20 | Wayne Harris.

I am a Jamaican-born Canadian. It disheartens me to see Selwyn Pieters (Boys Without Dads -- letter, Nov. 28) and others claim that "systemic racism" in institutions and schools is "forcing black kids to drop out" and that this is part of the "big picture" of why black youth is in such a quandary.

Your editorial (The Many Fatherless Boys In Black Families -- Nov. 26) says it like it is. The root cause starts in the home, not the community.

If the fathers were there to guide, teach, nurture and lead, then the community would not have to provide focused counselling and intervention.
ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  fatherhood  dysfunction  family  systemic_discrimination  the_big_picture 
november 2011 by jerryking
The need for fathers
Nov 29, 2005| The Globe and Mail pg. A.20 | Carol Richards-Sauer.

Your editorial rightly claims we need to admit that the absence of black fathers contributes to social alienation and violent behaviour among some of their sons. The silence that you decry, however, is not universal.

Recently, I have participated in a town-hall meeting and been in the audience at a round-table discussion about gun violence.

Each time, at least one brave black person from the audience spoke about the issue. Each time, their comments sparked little discussion or self-evaluation.

The topic is rarely addressed because too many community leaders, often self-appointed, have become too focused on blaming forces from without that we can't control as primary or sole causes of black disenfranchisement.

We need to recognize also those forces from within that we can control. We need to characterize ourselves not just as people to whom bad things are done (racism, police brutality, school suspensions etc.) but also as people who make choices that sometimes lead to bad results.

This is necessary to make any true change and to win helpful alliances
ProQuest  fatherhood  family  dysfunction  African_Canadians  disenfranchisement  silence  individual_choice  autonomy  violence  killings  family_breakdown  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  beyond_one's_control 
november 2011 by jerryking
FT.com / Companies / US & Canada - Wal-Mart presses suppliers on diversity
By Jonathan Birchall in New York

February 20 2007 22:05 | Last updated: February 20 2007

The initiative follows a drive by Wal-Mart’s legal department – which generates about $200m of business for outside firms annually – to pressure its outside counsel to give more prominence to women and ethnic minorities in key decision-making positions on its account.

The programme led the retailer to take away business from two law firms that failed to meet its objectives, and to stop giving new business to several others.

It also mirrors a similar push by Wal-Mart on environmental issues, as chief executive Lee Scott, seeks to remake the company’s corporate image.

Wal-Mart’s reputation on diversity continues to be overshadowed by a pending class action law suit filed in 2001 that accuses the company of systematically discriminating against its women workers. Wal-Mart rejects the charges made in the suit.
ethnic_communities  visible_minorities  Wal-Mart  supply_chains  diversity  Jonathan_Birchall  inhouse  systemic_discrimination  law_firms  supply_chain_squeeze  class_action_lawsuits  outside_counsel 
november 2011 by jerryking

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