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jerryking : systemic_racism   5

We need to talk about the boys -
MAY 5, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | MARGARET WENTE.

It’s girls who get all the attention these days. But it’s the boys we should be worried about. Boys lag girls in school at every level. They drop out, get in trouble with the law, and become disconnected from the mainstream – sometimes for good.

Jamil Jivani was heading there himself. He grew up in Brampton, Ont....At age 16, he couldn’t read – or didn’t care enough to. He was convinced the system was rigged against him. His role models were gansta rappers. Police officers gave him a hard time. His dad wasn’t in the picture.....Mr. Jivani is now 30. He is a law professor, a graduate of Yale, and an activist for disadvantaged communities. His personal story is the powerful thread running through his new book, Why Young Men: Rage, Race and the Crisis of Identity......He aims to change the conversation from “either/or” to “and also.” “If you’re trying to change the conditions young men grow up in,” he says, “you need to talk about both law enforcement and families.”

He gets pushback saying things like that. “People are used to hearing a certain kind of narrative – the world is unfair, racist, biased, and the primary concern we should have is that these are systems that oppress us – systemic racism, sexism, and so on. It’s amazing how much this passes as a truth.”

Mr. Jivani believes that we can’t address the crisis of young men without talking about families and culture. For boys, fathers are their first line of defence. Without fathers, they may have no positive role models for how to be a man.

“A lot of people in the black community want to talk about fatherlessness,” he says. But we seldom hear from them. The voices you hear are all from one side, and the media seldom seek out any other perspectives.

People censor themselves too. “..... Black Lives Matter makes things worse. “It’s a style of activism that tries to define people – to tell them this is what you’re supposed to think and do because of your identity.” ....“BLM’s approach to activism focuses on having an enemy that must be defeated,” he writes. “It is accusatory at its core.”
Margaret_Wente  fatherhood  parenting  dysfunction  Black_Lives_Matter  African_Canadians  books  crisis  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  lawyers  Osgoode  family_breakdown  values  dropouts  achievement_gaps  Yale  activism  economically_disadvantaged  victimhood 
may 2018 by jerryking
No Racial Barrier Left to Break (Except All of Them) - The New York Times
JAN. 14, 2017 | NYT | By KHALIL GIBRAN MUHAMMAD.

The future is no longer about “firsts.” It is instead about the content of the character of the institutions our new leaders will help us rebuild....The U.S. can’t create a more just nation simply by dressing up institutions in more shades of brown. Now there must be an effort to confront structural racism.....for African-Americans, Obama's travails are proof positive that MLK's contention that the content of one’s character would be the perfect antidote to racism is necessary but--by itself--insufficient to heal the gaping wounds of racial injustice in America.....in a post-assimilation America where there is no racial [occupational] barrier left to break, [African] Americans must turn to confronting structural racism and the values of our institutions....Obama's pedigree and character couldn’t protect/save him from the Tea Party revolution, Republican obstructionism, police brutality, voter suppression and Islamophobia.... individuals, no matter how singular, cannot bend the moral arc of the universe....In a post-assimilation America, recognize that institutions are far more powerful than individuals, no matter how many people of color can be counted in leadership. Structural racism is immune to identity politics....history matters. Black people in charge of, or embedded in, institutions that have not atoned for their history of racism can make it easier for those institutions to ignore or dismiss present-day claims of racial bias. That’s because the path to leadership has often meant accepting institutions as they are, not disrupting them.....people of color can inherit or perpetuate structures of inequality. Many institutions of government, finance and higher education were built on the backs of enslaved African-Americans and remain haunted by that history. Diversity and inclusion policies, therefore, should grow out of truth and reconciliation practices as well as strategic hiring plans. Intentional transformation, even reparations, one government agency, one company, one college at a time moves us past the denial and the empty promises....In post-assimilation America, people of color must continue to pursue leadership roles as the demographics of the nation inexorably change. But they must also reject their personal achievement as the core measure of progress and instead use history as a tool to measure systemic change.
Obama  legacies  institutions  farewells  history  obstructionism  GOP  Tea_Party  MLK  leaders  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  institutional_change  identity_politics  structural_change  African-Americans  Georgetown_University  assimilation  institutional_path_dependency 
january 2017 by jerryking
Why black Canadians are facing U.S.-style problems - The Globe and Mail
DOUG SAUNDERS
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jul. 16, 2016

What’s the root of this discrimination, which takes place even when officials are racially diverse and liberal-minded? In part, it’s institutional path dependency: Police and judges have always responded to suspects based on traditional patterns (and on patterns learned from the U.S. media and justice system), and it’s hard to break those ugly traditions.

That’s dangerous, because black Canadians are also inordinately excluded from home ownership, neighbourhoods with good public transit and key employment markets. That’s partly due to the timing and economic circumstances of Caribbean immigration, partly due to racism.

Either way, it creates a spiral of discrimination: A group of Canadians who live in fringe rental-only neighbourhoods, with less secure employment and access to resources, who face a more hostile police and justice system, hurting their chances of advancement.
African_Canadians  Canadian  Doug_Saunders  geographic_segregation  racial_disparities  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  racial_discrimination  institutional_path_dependency  exclusion  marginalization 
july 2016 by jerryking
The need for fathers
Nov 29, 2005| The Globe and Mail pg. A.20 | Carol Richards-Sauer.

Your editorial rightly claims we need to admit that the absence of black fathers contributes to social alienation and violent behaviour among some of their sons. The silence that you decry, however, is not universal.

Recently, I have participated in a town-hall meeting and been in the audience at a round-table discussion about gun violence.

Each time, at least one brave black person from the audience spoke about the issue. Each time, their comments sparked little discussion or self-evaluation.

The topic is rarely addressed because too many community leaders, often self-appointed, have become too focused on blaming forces from without that we can't control as primary or sole causes of black disenfranchisement.

We need to recognize also those forces from within that we can control. We need to characterize ourselves not just as people to whom bad things are done (racism, police brutality, school suspensions etc.) but also as people who make choices that sometimes lead to bad results.

This is necessary to make any true change and to win helpful alliances
ProQuest  fatherhood  family  dysfunction  African_Canadians  disenfranchisement  silence  individual_choice  autonomy  violence  killings  family_breakdown  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  beyond_one's_control 
november 2011 by jerryking

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