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jerryking : talent_acquisition   8

Merck C.E.O. Ken Frazier on Death Row Cases and the Corporate Soul - The New York Times
By David Gelles

March 9, 2018

How do you prioritize your time?

There are three things that the C.E.O. should be focused on. Number one is that sense of purpose and direction that the company needs, making sure that that’s always clear and people know what we’re all about. The second thing is capital allocation. We only have so many resources. Making sure that you’re putting those resources where you have the greatest opportunity. And the third, which I think by far is the most important, is to make sure that you have the right people in the most important jobs inside the company.
African-Americans  capital_allocation  CEOs  death_row  Kenneth_Frazier  HLS  lawyers  Merck  new_graduates  pharmaceutical_industry  priorities  purpose  resource_allocation  talent_acquisition  think_threes  the_right_people 
march 2018 by jerryking
Google’s secret: hire people for what they don’t know yet - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Nov. 25 2014

One year, after speaking before a group of Rhodes Scholars, senior Google executive Jonathan Rosenberg was trying to decide who from that exceptional group to invite to formal interviews when he ran into company founder Sergey Brin in a hallway and explained the problem. "Why decide at all?" his boss said. "Offer them all jobs." It seemed crazy but after second thought he realized it made sense to grab the best talent you can and deploy them effectively. Many went on to be very successful at the company.......The authors stress that hiring is the most important thing executives do. "The higher up you go in most organizations, the more detached the executives get from the hiring process. The inverse should be true," they declare. That means not leaving the decision to the hiring manager, who may not be the individual's boss for long and may be edgy about hiring individuals more talented than he is.
Google  hiring  Rhodes  talent  Harvey_Schachter  talent_acquisition 
november 2014 by jerryking
What's Next for Newsmagazines? - WSJ.com
April 4, 2008 | WSJ | By REBECCA DANA.
Fading Publications Try to Reinvent Themselves Yet Again

"Like any managers anywhere, we looked at a revenue picture that could be more thrilling and said, 'How can we accomplish two or three things?,' " Mr. Meacham said in an interview. " 'How can we control costs? How can we have money to rebuild and hire new voices and new reporting talent? And how can we do that in the service of what we've been trying to do with the magazine of the last year-and-a-half, which is make it more serious and try to make ourselves indispensable to the conversation?' "....."My whole view was there's more information out there than any time in human history. What people don't need more of is information," Mr. Stengel said. "They need a guide through the chaos."..."What's happened in the business as a whole is talk is cheap and reporting is expensive," said Newsweek writer Jonathan Alter, a 25-year veteran at the magazine who qualified for the buyout but declined it. But he adds, some of the change in culture is welcome. "In general, the office politics are at a much lower volume than in the past because the old fight of space is different than it was. If there's not room in the magazine for something, you can just do it online," he said.....At a recent speech at Columbia University, Mr. Meacham delivered a blistering response after he asked who reads Newsweek and none of the 100-odd students in attendance raised their hands.

"It's an incredible frustration that I've got some of the most decent, hard-working, honest, passionate, straight-shooting, non-ideological people who just want to tell the damn truth, and how to get this past this image that we're just middlebrow, you know, a magazine that your grandparents get, or something, that's the challenge," Mr. Meacham said. "And I just don't know how to do it, so if you've got any ideas, tell me."
chaos  commoditization_of_information  cost-controls  cost-cutting  curation  indispensable  information_overload  Jon_Meacham  journalists  journalism  magazines  multiple_targets  newsstand_circulation  office_politics  print_journalism  questions  reinvention  talent_acquisition  think_threes 
june 2012 by jerryking
Starting Up in High Gear
July-August 2000 | HBR |An Interview with Vinod Khosla by David Champion and Nicholas G. Carr.

To create the kind of new wealth you’re talking about, we’re going to have to see massive investments in information technology. Where’s the money going to come from?

It’s going to come out of corporate budgets. Companies invest wherever they’re going to get the biggest returns, and right now that’s IT. Look at the trend in capital expenditures. Twenty years ago, information technology accounted for about 10% of capital expenditures in the United States. ...
Today, if you have a plan for a new business, you circulate it in the venture community and you get funded in a week. What you don’t get is an honest, painstaking critique. What are the downsides in your plan? What are the shortcomings? What are the weak links? The strengths of your idea get a lot of attention, but the weaknesses get ignored—and ultimately it’s the weaknesses of your plan that will kill you. A start-up is only as strong as its weakest link....
The first thing we focused on was getting the right set of people for the company—the right gene pool. We started out on the technical end. Pradeep had helped architect the Ultrasparc processor at Sun, so he had strong skills in building technical architectures and could apply those skills to routers. But he needed somebody with experience in building and operating an IP network, and he needed somebody who’d done operating systems software for routers and somebody who’d done protocols for routers. So we drew out a map that said, “Here are the ten different areas of expertise we need.” Then we made a list of the companies doing the best work in each area, and we listed the five people in each company who would make good targets. We went after those people, and piece by piece we assembled a multidisciplinary team that could make Juniper a leader.
IT  interviews  HBR  Kleiner_Perkins  start_ups  large_companies  management_consulting  Vinod_Khosla  executive_search  shortcomings  weaknesses  new_businesses  CAPEX  weak_links  Nicholas_Carr  talent_acquisition  gene_pool  expertise  team_risk  wealth_creation  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  teams  protocols 
june 2012 by jerryking
Western Alumni Gazette - What’s the price of attracting great minds?
Winter 2011
Back Page - The Final Say
RSS
What’s the price of attracting great minds?
by Paul Wells, BA'89

Ontario is in a global battle to attract the best minds. It’s all very sweet of Hudak’s education critic, Jim Wilson, to claim that McGuinty “could find the best and brightest already on our own soil,” but what are the odds? Ontario has one-fifth of one percent of the world’s population. I’m going to bet that most of the best and brightest are somewhere else. Some of them work at the Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy at the U.S. National Academies of Science, which wrote in 2009, “The issue for the United States, as for other nations, is that a knowledge-driven economy is more productive if it has access to the best talent regardless of national origin.” Attracting international students has been a pillar of U.S. economic policy for longer than Jim Wilson has been alive. “Talented international graduate students and postdoctoral scholars are drawn to the United States because of the high quality of our research universities [and] the availability of stipends and research funding,” the committee wrote in the same report.
Paul_Wells  Dalton_McGuinty  Colleges_&_Universities  UWO  Ontario  scholars  students  scholarships  talent  knowledge_economy  foreign_scholarships  brainpower  talent_acquisition  the_best_and_brightest 
october 2011 by jerryking
Letters - How to Build a Successful CEO - NYTimes.com
May 20, 2009 | NYT |

Successful chief executives combine four abilities:

¶The ability to allocate cash flow for growth. Without growth, little else matters.

¶The ability to pick the right managers for the operating jobs. C.E.O. “vision” is largely realized through the people in the critical posts.

¶The ability to inspire the troops. Charisma comes in many colors; getting others to be excited about the mission is one of them.

¶The ability to be aware of and understand all the moving parts. Chief executives don’t need in-depth knowledge of every discipline — accounting, marketing, sales, benefits, taxes and so on — but they need to know enough about each one to ask the right questions.

None of these four are easy, and in combination, they are very hard to find.
letters_to_the_editor  CEOs  howto  ksfs  fingerspitzengefühl  contextual_intelligence  growth  hiring  executive_management  charisma  cash_flows  capital_allocation  hard_to_find  asking_the_right_questions  talent_acquisition  the_right_people 
may 2009 by jerryking
The Secrets of the Talent Scouts - NYTimes.com
March 14, 2009 | NYT | By GEORGE ANDERS dedicated to the early
end of the talent management process: spotting/scouting and recruiting.
Lessons learned: take chances on passionate people early in their work
lives, focus on what can go right, offer rewards no one else can match
and harness the lessons of your own career.
talent_management  lessons_learned  recruiting  talent_acquisition  spotting  scouting  hiring  Michael_Moritz  George_Anders  talent_scouting 
march 2009 by jerryking
Google Adjusts Hiring Process As Needs Grow
Oct 23, 2006. | Wall Street Journal. (Eastern edition). New York, N.Y.: pg. B.1| by Kevin J. Delaney.
Google  interviews  growth  hiring  recruiting  talent  talent_acquisition 
march 2009 by jerryking

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