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What if you’re not chosen for a ‘hi-po’ programme?
AUGUST 10, 2019 | Financial Times | Elizabeth Uviebinené.

Organisations naturally need to have a leadership pipeline through which they identify, develop and promote high potential (hi-po) employees who can lead the company in the future. However, given that most will not be selected, it is inevitable that some talented individuals will feel overlooked.

Organisations devote significant resources to these “chosen few”. They give a few individuals privileged access to training, exposure to decision makers and mentorship, all of which helps propel them towards the coveted top spot..... such programmes are invitation only. But how to get invited on to them is usually a closely guarded secret. Sometimes it is a formal process, but at other times it is at the discretion of senior management....So what happens when you are not chosen for a “fast track” programme? It is easy to start questioning your capabilities and even aspirations. It can be a motivation killer at first, leaving you feeling undervalued.....Harvard Business Review data suggests companies are bad at correctly identifying high-potential employees....The best organisations build a culture that nurtures high-potential individuals whether or not there is a formal talent development programme in place. This is especially true for women and minorities in the workplace who remain under-represented at every level in the corporate talent pipeline....New research from Northwestern University in the US suggests that early career hurdles actually help spur future success. The study showed that experiencing setbacks at the start of a career has a powerful and opposing effect: “Individuals with near misses systematically outperformed those with near wins in the long run.”

Early success does not always predict future success. Longer term, what you do when faced with disappointment usually determines whether or not you have what it takes to have a successful career....If you just missed out on a talent development programme, do not be disheartened. It leaves open the possibility of proving yourself on your own terms, rather than getting boxed into one company’s view of what leadership looks like.
career_paths  fast_track  HBR  high-achieving  invitation-only  leadership  leadership_development  Managing_Your_Career  mentoring  middle_management  movingonup  selection_processes  strivers  talent  talent_management  talent_pipelines  talent_spotting  talent_scouting  training  up-and-comers 
august 2019 by jerryking
Michael Ovitz, Hollywood super-agent, on ‘winning at all costs’
SEPTEMBER 28, 2018 | Financial Times | by Matthew Garrahan.

In Ovtiz's 20 years at CAA, it assembled hit after hit, including Jurassic Park, Tootsie, Goodfellas and Dances with Wolves. He talks about the agency as though describing a military campaign (he is a keen student of Sun Tzu’s The Art of War). “When I was at CAA, I had a singular mission, which was to win at all costs,” he says. “We were ultra-competitive and we were in a service business but my thesis was that we weren’t selling a product. We were selling and putting together people’s dreams . . . if we showed a weak link then we would be vulnerable. Vulnerability was a sin.”....Ovitz explains that the memoir evolved from an earlier idea about a book on deals. He played a leading role in the arrival of Japanese companies in Hollywood three decades ago, advising Sony on its 1989 purchase of Columbia Pictures and the sale a year later of Lew Wasserman’s MCA (later renamed Universal, and now part of Sky’s new owner Comcast) to Matsushita. Advising Japanese buyers was a strategic move, he explains. “If the studios are in trouble and going to go out of business, we lose leverage and our clients lose jobs. But if we can bring people in to buy the studios, not only do clients continue to get jobs but we’re the people talking to the owners.”...Ron Meyer and Ovitz
slowly built an empire, starting in television and moving into films, with the aim of representing every significant writer, director and star in town: “no conflict, no interest” was his mantra. It was a radically different model to what had come before. “Agents traditionally fielded orders, so if I was your agent and someone had a job, they’d call me and ask for you,” he says. “Or they’d tell me they had an assignment and, if you happened to be available, I’d pitch you.” Agencies were like “clearing-houses”.....that was archaic. You’re a writer, you’re loaded with ideas . . . why don’t we take those ideas and add elements to them and then sell the whole thing and let you control it? Why would we just wait to answer the phone?”.....Agents took on a more central role in Hollywood after CAA’s rise to power, assembling the composite parts of a film or television project before taking the “package” of script, star and director to the studios....."[Endeavour's] thesis is very similar to the thesis we had [at CAA], which is to expand into new areas that can service clients.”
actors  books  CAA  creating_valuable_content  dealmakers  deal-making  Hollywood  memoirs  Michael_Ovitz  professional_service_firms  Sun_Tzu  talent_management  talent_representation  vindictiveness  Lew_Wasserman 
october 2018 by jerryking
Ari Emanuel's WME-IMG Merger: The Possible Financial Troubles
March 2015 | | Vanity Fair | BY WILLIAM D. COHAN.

“Take advantage of each day that's given to you, and do something to move the needle on your business, even if it's just an inch. You've heard it before, but life is not a dress rehearsal. Don't waste your time (or mine).”....In 2009, Emanuel decided to take another big risk. “Nobody fucks up like I do,” he once wrote, “but you'll never succeed unless you take big risks. Big ones.”......“There's nobody more important when it comes to television packaging than Ari and Rick Rosen [WME's television chief],” says entertainment mogul David Geffen. “There's nobody who does it better. For instance, Steven Spielberg was at CAA for decades, and they did nothing for him in television, and he goes with Ari, and he has had seven or eight shows on the air. That's about accomplishment, not about bullshit.”........Over the next decade Forstmann transformed IMG into an international production-and-packaging powerhouse. The expanding business cut profitable deals with more than 200 American college and university sports teams, as well as with Indian Premier League cricket, Wimbledon, the Australian and U.S. Open tennis tournaments, tennis tournaments in Spain and Malaysia, and Barclays Premier League soccer. It ran Fashion Week in New York, Milan, and London, and in China it formed an exclusive joint venture with the national television network to create sports programming—all this in addition to representing such sports stars as Novak Djokovic, Maria Sharapova, and Venus Williams. It also signed up an array of fashion designers and models, including Michael Kors, Diane von Furstenberg, Gisele Bündchen, and Kate Moss.
Ari_Emanuel  mybestlife  talent_management  mergers_&_acquisitions  entertainment_industry  chutzpah  Hollywood  overachievers  Ted_Forstmann  talent_representation  dealmakers  packaging  Silver_Lake  affirmations  idea_generation  creating_valuable_content  hard_work  performance  strivers  sports  fashion  superstars  risk-taking  William_Cohan  James_Baldwin  personal_accomplishments 
march 2015 by jerryking
Hollywood Talent Agency’s New Division to Manage Visual Artists’ Careers - WSJ
By KELLY CROW
Feb. 10, 2015
Should painters and sculptors be treated like movie stars? United Talent Agency thinks so.

The Beverly Hills, Calif., agency known for representing actors like Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie said Tuesday it has launched a division called UTA Fine Arts to manage the careers of contemporary visual artists.

The move marks the first time a Hollywood talent agency has stepped into a role traditionally played by art galleries, and it underscores the growing commercial appeal that top artists wield in the global, multibillion-dollar art market.

Jim Berkus, chairman, said the agency won’t broker art sales or show the art as galleries do, but he said the art division will help contemporary artists amass financing for their creative projects and sign potentially lucrative corporate sponsorships and merchandising deals. Mr. Berkus said the firm will also assist artists who want to get more involved in the moviemaking business....The agency’s arrival is likely to rattle the art establishment, particularly the growing list of mega-dealers who have opened gallery branches around the world and are known for transforming artists into museum-ready superstars.

Marc Glimcher, who oversees the New York powerhouse Pace Gallery, said he thinks talent agents could drive a divisive wedge between artists and their dealers, who have historically guided artists toward commissions or relationships that may secure them a lasting place in art history.

“It sounds like an interesting idea, but it’s going to be super hard to pull off,” Mr. Glimcher said. “If you’re going to be an artist’s agent, you need to know more about their work, their prices and their collectors than their own dealer does—and no dealer will be induced to share that kind of information.”

Beyond market intelligence, Mr. Glimcher said talent agents will need to discern how many commercial deals an artist can shoulder without looking like a sellout to art-world insiders: “Do too much, and you’re just not cool anymore,” he added.
Hollywood  talent_management  career  contemporary_art  artists  product_launches  galleries  lawyers  entertainment_industry  market_intelligence  talent_representation  superstars  art_market 
february 2015 by jerryking
Korn/Ferry’s CEO: What Boards Want in Executives - WSJ
By LAUREN WEBER
Dec. 9, 2014

Korn/Ferry has been trying to boost its business in talent management, offering recruiting and development tools aimed at professional employees....Korn/Ferry’s slow transition by acquiring leadership-development firms like PDI Ninth House and Global Novations LLC, and converting its bank of knowledge about executive careers into a portfolio of products that organizations can buy or license, from interview guides to software that helps managers identify and cultivate high-potential employees.

Mr. Burnison: For the boardroom or the C-suite, the technical competencies are a starting point. What we’ve seen through our research is that the No. 1 predictor of executive success is learning agility. So we want to get a real line of sight into a person’s thinking style and leadership style. Right now, you’re seeing me how I want you to see me. What you really want to know is “How does Gary make decisions under pressure?”

WSJ: What is learning agility?

Mr. Burnison: It comes down to people’s willingness to grow, to learn, to have insatiable curiosity. Think about the levers of growth that a CEO has. You can consolidate, or tap [new markets], or innovate. When it comes down to the last two, particularly innovation, you want a workforce that is incredibly curious.
Korn_Ferry  executive_search  boards_&_directors_&_governance  CEOs  talent_management  turnover  executive_management  learning_agility  adaptability  C-suite 
december 2014 by jerryking
Why I Do All My Recruiting Through LinkedIn - NYTimes.com
AUGUST 19, 2014 | NYT |By REBEKAH CAMPBELL.

How, in a sea of people, can I find my ideal candidate?

In the past, I would have posted job ads on all the appropriate websites and braced for a flood of applications....the problem was that the best candidates all had good positions and were not reading job advertisements. Somehow, I had to find these people and convince them to take a risk by joining our start-up. The only solution seemed to be to hire a recruiter and, as a cash-strapped small business, we just couldn’t afford to shell out a recruitment fee of 20 percent of the candidate’s annual salary....sign up to LinkedIn’s Recruiter service. For $2,200 per quarter, I can run detailed searches on exactly the type of candidates I’m looking for and then approach them en masse.
LinkedIn  recruiting  talent_management  talent  cash-strapped  howto  small_business  running_a_business 
august 2014 by jerryking
Innovation: If you can’t make yourself obsolete, someone else will - The Globe and Mail
GUY DIXON
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 26 2014

I think at the root of the problem is a deficit of ambition [JCK: i.e. a lack of chutzpah or audacity] The larger the corporation, the safer they become. What I’ve witnessed, certainly between 2008, 2009, is this deficit of ambition.....All of our research points to the fact that companies that do manage and measure innovation outperform those that don’t. You can put resources into place, and that’s where managing it comes in: deploying resources that will support innovative, new ideas; ensuring that you have a strong knowledge architecture – and that it is a formal, systemic thing, so that people access knowledge that is already developed; ensuring access to markets – that’s a structural element. Do your people have access to customers and markets?; and actively managing talent and selecting people and promoting them and ensuring that they have an orientation toward innovation and the development of new ideas....What percentage of turnover or revenue is presented by products that have been introduced in the past number of years? And for different companies, in different industries, that’s going to vary. Companies that are very successful treat that number as sacrosanct for the sales projection for next year and the bottom line for next year....Way too many companies are focused on market share versus the modern metric of, ‘Are we gaining a disproportionate share of opportunity?’ [Is this distinction something to be explored with the help of sensors, location-based services and the LBMA??] And then we’re back to this abandonment thing.
Managing_Your_Career  organizational_culture  playing_it_safe  innovation  metrics  ambitions  opportunities  market_share  complacency  measurements  talent_management  ideas  obsolescence  disproportionality  latent  hidden  self-obsolescence  large_companies  new_products  Fortune_500  brands  Guy_Dixon  outperformance  systematic_approaches 
june 2014 by jerryking
Brash Agent at William Morris Extends Reach in IMG Merger - NYTimes.com
December 17, 2013, 4:12 pm 13 Comments
Brash Agent at William Morris Extends Reach in IMG Merger
By BROOKS BARNES and DAVID GELLES
private_equity  Hollywood  Ari_Emanuel  talent_management  Silver_Lake  talent_representation  entertainment_industry  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  talent  chutzpah 
december 2013 by jerryking
Jack Welch: 'Rank-and-Yank'? That's Not How It's Done - WSJ.com
Nov. 14, 2013 | WSJ| By Jack Welch

Unlike "rank-and-yank"—differentiation isn't about corporate plots, secrecy or purges. It's about building great teams and great companies through consistency, transparency and candor. It's about aligning performance with the organization's mission and values. It's about making sure that all employees know where they stand. Differentiation is nuanced, humane, and occasionally complex, and it has been used successfully by companies for decades....Differentiation starts with communication—exhaustive communication—of a company's mission (where it's going) and its values (the behaviors that are going to get it there)....Differentiation requires managers to let every employee know where he or she stands—how they're doing today, both quantitatively and qualitatively, and what their future with the company looks like. Are they a star in terms of both results and values (say, in the top 20% of the team), about average (say, about 70%), or not up to expectations (the bottom 10%)? Note: The 20-70-10 distribution is not set in stone. Some companies use A, B, and C grades, and there are other approaches as well.

Without a doubt, some companies use differentiation but leave this "grading" part out....The final component that makes differentiation work so effectively is feedback and coaching. Your stars know they are loved and rarely leave. Those in the middle 70% know that they are appreciated, and they receive clear guidance about how to improve their performance. And the bottom 10% is never surprised when the conversation sometimes turns, after a year of candid appraisals, to moving on.
Jack_Welch  talent_management  performance  performance_reviews  assessments_&_evaluations 
november 2013 by jerryking
The headhunter’s role in the digital age - The Globe and Mail
RENEE SYLVESTRE-WILLIAMS

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Thursday, Jun. 13 2013

headhunters can find and assess candidates to find the perfect person for a particular job. This saves companies a lot of time, she adds, making it worth their while to pay for a headhunter’s services.

“We identify the talent pool for that specific [job] requirement,” Ms. Pastor explains. “We want to find people who don’t contact us. LinkedIn is one tool and there is a small per cent of talented people there because not everyone is on it.”
executive_search  headhunters  LinkedIn  talent  human_resources  leadership  human_capital  talent_management  talent_pools 
june 2013 by jerryking
First on your to-do list? The unpleasant tasks
Jun. 09 2013 | - The Globe and Mail | by HARVEY SCHACHTER.

increasing the overall demand for what you sell – making the pie bigger, rather than figuring out on how to divide it with competitors – is an important part of success....Stop focusing on the quality of your work, because people care more about the quality of their own work, advises blogger Ben Drake. Help others improve by asking them what they need from you to help them soar.
Harvey_Schachter  serving_others  talent_management  thinking_big  to-do 
june 2013 by jerryking
Professional firms: Simply the best
Apr 13th 2013 | The Economist |

What It Takes: Seven Secrets of Success from the World’s Greatest Professional Firms. By Charles Ellis. Wiley; 290 pages; $40 and £26.99.

During a long career advising senior professionals, Mr Ellis found that a handful of firms were almost universally regarded by their peers as the best in their particular business. As well as McKinsey (management consulting) and Goldman (investment banking), they included Capital Group (investment management), the Mayo Clinic (health care) and Cravath, Swaine & Moore (law). He was surprised to discover that each of the firms had several things in common. These include leaders who devote their lives to serving their firm rather than enriching themselves (though that tended to follow naturally), a good sense of what motivates staff to get up early and work late and the ability to get individualistic professionals to function unusually well in teams.

Above all, these firms are fanatical about recruiting new employees who are not just the most talented but also the best suited to a particular corporate culture. These firms’ bosses spend a disproportionate amount of time on the recruitment process, often putting it before other more immediately lucrative demands on their time. McKinsey interviews 200,000 people each year, but selects just over 1%.

Each McKinsey applicant can be interviewed eight times before being offered a job; at Goldman, twice that is not unheard of. At Capital a serious candidate is likely to be seen by 20 people, some more than once. Recruitment, these firms believe, is the start of a lifelong relationship. At the same time, Goldman and McKinsey also have a policy of helping their staff to find suitable work elsewhere, all in the expectation that they will eventually become loyal customers.
best_of  books  book_reviews  disproportionality  Goldman_Sachs  high-achieving  lifelong  McKinsey  organizational_culture  outplacement  overachievers  professional_service_firms  recruiting  relationships  selection_processes  selectivity  serving_others  talent_management 
april 2013 by jerryking
With New Move, Jay-Z Enters a Sports Agent State of Mind - NYTimes.com
By KEN BELSON
Published: April 2, 2013

Roc Nation Sports is the newest arm of Roc Nation, Jay-Z’s “full-service entertainment company” that has quickly built a strong reputation representing artists like Rihanna, Shakira and M.I.A. Jay-Z has been temporarily licensed to represent professional baseball players, said Ron Berkowitz, a spokesman for Roc Nation Sports, which also has teamed with Creative Artists Agency, a leading Hollywood agency that provides formidable negotiating authority.
Jay-Z  sports  talent_management  Live_Nation  baseball  talent_representation 
april 2013 by jerryking
Robinson Cano Leaves Scott Boras for Jay-Z’s Agency - NYTimes.com
By DAVID WALDSTEIN
Published: April 2, 2013

In an announcement Tuesday, the new agency, Roc Nation, which is affiliated with Creative Artists Agency Sports, said it had signed Cano as its centerpiece and first client.

The announcement included a statement attributed to Cano.

“At this point in my career, I am ready to take a more active role in my endeavors both on and off the field,” it read. “I am confident that the pairing of Roc Nation Sports and C.A.A. Sports will be essential in helping me accomplish my short- and long-term goals. I am making this important decision now so I can keep my focus on helping the Yankees succeed in 2013, while minimizing any distractions for me and my teammates.”
Jay-Z  sports  talent_management  talent_representation 
april 2013 by jerryking
How to find and keep the right people
February 19, 2013
As HR departments compile mountains of data, they can look into the future to target the right hires, and find those at risk of leaving

MARJO JOHNE
Special to The Globe and Mai
analytics  data_driven  human_resources  talent_management  hiring  the_right_people 
february 2013 by jerryking
Why Does Google Crave Elites for Their Management Team While Apple Eschews Them? - Forbes
Eric Jackson, Contributor

I cover the business of technology
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11/27/2012
Google  Apple  talent_management  executive_management  talent 
november 2012 by jerryking
Surfing the Silver Tsunami
One quarter of CEOs say they can’t pursue market opportunities or strategic initiatives because they don’t have the talent they need. And you thought the economy was sluggish! Fact is, the en masse departure of the Baby Boom from the workforce is creating some critical gaps, and human resources professionals and recruiters are working hard to fill them.
talent_management  talent  aging  baby_boomers  grey_tsunami  human_resources  Ivey  alumni  demographic_changes  market_opportunities  retirement  bow_wave 
october 2012 by jerryking
Meet the New Boss: Big Data - WSJ.com
September 20, 2012, 11:16 a.m. ET

Meet the New Boss: Big Data
Companies Trade In Hunch-Based Hiring for Computer Modeling

Though hiring is a crucial business function, conventional methods are remarkably short on rigor, experts say. Depending on who decides, what gets candidates hired can vary wildly—from academic achievement to work experience to appearance. Managers who go with their gut might get it right sometimes, but their hunches generally have little value in predicting how someone will perform on the job. Companies peddling a statistical approach to hiring say they can improve results by reducing the influence of a manager's biases.

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massive_data_sets  data_driven  hiring  talent_management  gut_feelings  academic_achievement 
september 2012 by jerryking
Managing Risk In the 21st Century
February 7, 2000 | Fortune | By Thomas A. Stewart.

Take risk management, a responsibility of the treasury function. Most risk managers haven't begun to cope with the real threats 21st-century companies face. Like the drunk in the old joke who looks for his lost keys under the streetlamp because the light is better there, risk management is dealing with visible classes of risk while greater, unmanaged dangers accumulate in the dark.

Risk--let's get this straight upfront--is good. The point of risk management isn't to eliminate it; that would eliminate reward. The point is to manage it--that is, to choose where to place bets, where to hedge bets, and where to avoid betting altogether. Though most risk-management tools--insurance, hedging, diversification, etc.--have to do with reducing loss, the goal is to maximize the gains from the risks you take (alpha? McDerment?)

So where should we look for these new risks?

--Your reputation or brand. When a bad batch of carbon dioxide in Coca-Cola sickened some Belgian children last summer, Coke's European operating income fell about $205 million, and Coca-Cola Enterprises, the bottler, incurred $103 million in costs. What about the cost to brand equity? One highly imperfect proxy: Coke's market capitalization fell $34 billion between June 30 and Sept. 30, 1999.

--Your business model. Asset-free, knowledge-intensive competition is to entrenched business models what the Panzer was to the Maginot Line. MP3s changed the music business more fundamentally than anything since radio. E*Trade, 18 years old, forced Merrill Lynch, 180, to change its way of doing business. Yet the new guys' very nimbleness creates its own risks, which traditional risk management can't help. You can protect the hard assets of a brick-and-mortar mall. Click-and-order stores are much more exposed: Cash flow is just about all they've got.

--Your human capital. The obvious human-capital risk is flight--especially in a tight labor market--but it's only part of a larger, subtler problem. When the CEO intones, "People are our most important asset," he's wrong, even if he's sincere. People are your most important investors. Your stock of human capital matters less than your flow of it. Any turbulence--and is there anything but turbulence these days?--can disrupt the flow, damaging your ability to attract human capital or people's desire to collaborate. Says Thomas Davenport, a partner at Towers Perrin: "Uncertainty is a real enemy of human capital. People rebalance their ROI by cutting back the investment."

--Your intellectual property. Many risks to intellectual property--theft, for example--can be dealt with in obvious, if sometimes onerous, ways. Here's the cutting-edge question: How do you manage risk in the process by which new intellectual property is created? How do you cope with the fact that the safer a given R&D project is, the less likely it is to be a big-money breakthrough? How do you balance the virtues of specialization against those of diversification?

--Your network. No company is an island, entire of itself; odds are your business is embedded in a network you do not control. It's not just that AOL might crash and cost you a few days' sales; your whole business may depend on tangible and intangible assets that belong to outsourcing partners, franchisees, sugar daddies, or standard-setters.
There are a couple of patterns here. First, an ever-greater part of business risk comes from sources your company can't own--people, partners, environments. Second, volatility isn't just a currency or stock market risk anymore. Labor markets, technologies, even business models oscillate at higher frequencies--their behavior more and more resembling that of financial markets.

In those patterns are hints of how to manage intellectual risks--which we'll examine next time.
risk-management  21st._century  risks  Thomas_Stewart  reputation  branding  business_models  financial_markets  talent_management  intellectual_property  networks  human_capital  turbulence  uncertainty  volatility  instability  nimbleness  labour_markets  accelerated_lifecycles  intellectual_assets  e-commerce  external_interaction  talent_flows  cash_flows  network_risk  proxies  specialization  diversification  unknowns  brand_equity  asset-light  insurance  hedging  alpha  Michael_McDerment 
june 2012 by jerryking
Talent Shortage Looms Over Big Data - WSJ.com
April 29, 2012 | WSJ | By BEN ROONEY

Big Data's Big Problem: Little Talent

"A significant constraint on realizing value from Big Data will be a shortage of talent, particularly of people with deep expertise in statistics and machine learning, and the managers and analysts who know how to operate companies by using insights from Big Data," the report said. "We project a need for 1.5 million additional managers and analysts in the United States who can ask the right questions and consume the results of the analysis of Big Data effectively." What the industry needs is a new type of person: the data scientist.....Hilary Mason, chief scientist for the URL shortening service bit.ly, says a data scientist must have three key skills. "They can take a data set and model it mathematically and understand the math required to build those models; they can actually do that, which means they have the engineering skills…and finally they are someone who can find insights and tell stories from their data. That means asking the right questions, and that is usually the hardest piece."

It is this ability to turn data into information into action that presents the most challenges. It requires a deep understanding of the business to know the questions to ask. The problem that a lot of companies face is that they don't know what they don't know, as former U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld would say. The job of the data scientist isn't simply to uncover lost nuggets, but discover new ones and more importantly, turn them into actions. Providing ever-larger screeds of information doesn't help anyone.

One of the earliest tests for biggish data was applying it to the battlefield. The Pentagon ran a number of field exercises of its Force XXI—a device that allows commanders to track forces on the battlefield—around the turn of the century. The hope was that giving generals "exquisite situational awareness" (i.e. knowing everything about everyone on the battlefield) would turn the art of warfare into a science. What they found was that just giving bad generals more information didn't make them good generals; they were still bad generals, just better informed.

"People have been doing data mining for years, but that was on the premise that the data was quite well behaved and lived in big relational databases," said Mr. Shadbolt. "How do you deal with data sets that might be very ragged, unreliable, with missing data?"

In the meantime, companies will have to be largely self-taught, said Nick Halstead, CEO of DataSift, one of the U.K. start-ups actually doing Big Data. When recruiting, he said that the ability to ask questions about the data is the key, not mathematical prowess. "You have to be confident at the math, but one of our top people used to be an architect".
data_scientists  massive_data_sets  talent_management  talent  Pentagon  SecDef  limitations  shortages  McKinsey  war_for_talent  recruiting  Colleges_&_Universities  situational_awareness  questions  Donald_Rumsfeld  asking_the_right_questions 
june 2012 by jerryking
"Silver Lake buys into talent agency."
3 May 2012 | Financial Times | by Matthew Garrahan.

Silver Lake, the technology investment firm , has bought a 31 per cent stake in William Morris Endeavor Entertainment, which represents stars such as Matt Damon and Sacha Baron Cohen, to finance the expansion of the media and entertainment agency into new digital areas,
mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  talent  digital_media  talent_management  actors  entertainment_industry  Silver_Lake  talent_representation 
may 2012 by jerryking
Law Firms Pursue Growth by Poaching - WSJ.com
JANUARY 31, 2012 |WSJ |By JENNIFER SMITH

Law Firms Pursue Growth by Poaching in Tough Climate

Other firms aren't bashful about their goals. "We look for superstars," said John Quinn, managing partner at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP, which recently lured trial lawyer Bill Burck from Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP. "Our approach is sort of like the NFL draft."

Weil executive partner Barry M. Wolf said his firm hired 18 lateral partners last year, expanding several practice groups.
law_firms  lawyers  talent  talent_management  war_for_talent  poaching  superstars 
march 2012 by jerryking
HIRE LEARNING
22 Nov. 2006 | Report on Small Business | by Ken Hunt.

Finding the best people for the job takes time, money and focus.

(1) Know what you're looking for
(2) Consider how a new hire will fit into your company culture.
(3) Don't wait until you're desperate to hire.
(4)Use structured interviews.
(5) Ask behaviour-based questions.
(6) Get referrals.
(7) Check references and qualifications.
hiring  talent_management  interviews  personality_types/traits  small_business  referrals  reference-checking  references  cross-checking 
december 2011 by jerryking
HR getting short shrift: study
May 30, 2007 | The Globe and Mail. pg. C.1 | Virginia Galt.

"Over the past decade, there has been much talk about HR becoming a strategic business partner within the company, but we find HR is still primarily viewed as a cost centre or administrative function," Margot Thom, a partner with Deloitte Canada, said in releasing the report..."When business executives talk about HR, they focus on things like benefits, performance evaluations and HR operating efficiency. But when those same executives talk about 'people issues,' they focus on strategic challenges, such as talent management, work force productivity and leadership development - and in many cases the HR function isn't even mentioned," Ms. [Margot Thom] said, adding organizations are leaving HR "out of the loop" at their peril.
ProQuest  Virginia_Galt  human_resources  Deloitte  Octothorpe_Software  talent_management  productivity  leadership_development 
november 2011 by jerryking
Talent Wars
September 2006 | Canadian Lawyer | Kevin Marron
law_firms  globalization  talent  talent_management  war_for_talent 
november 2011 by jerryking
Scouting staffs are the true All-Stars in salary cap era
4/3/2008 | USATODAY.com | By Kevin Allen
When the salary cap was introduced, the league was supposed to be about younger free agents moving from team to team.

Instead, it's probably more about scouting and drafting than it has ever been....The salary cap system was supposed to be about all teams being on equal financial footing and general managers, from large and small markets, being able to jump into a rich free agent pool every summer....The key to staying in contention is having a steady stream of inexpensive younger players stepping in ...With the salary cap preventing large market teams from stockpiling talent, there is indeed less tolerance and patience for any long-term rebuilding plan. General managers are expected to repair as they rebuild....a poor drafting history now hurts a franchise far more than ineffective penalty killing. Good coaching can solve problems, but it can't overcome a lack of talent....if management is smart in those cities, what it should do is overhaul the thinking, or perhaps the personnel, making the drafting decisions. To win in this league, you need as many All-Stars on your scouting staff as you need in your lineup.
scouting  Octothorpe_Software  talent_management  talent  sports  salaries  large_markets  talent_scouting  stockpiles 
october 2011 by jerryking
A strategy for diversity and inclusion
March 2, 2010 | | By: Noëlle Richardson, Shamira Madhany and Kerry Pond
diversity  OPS  UFSC  talent_management 
september 2011 by jerryking
Andrew Wylie - WSJ.com
MAY 27, 2011 | WSJ Magazine | by Daniel Gross. Profile of old
school literary agent Andrew Wylie, of the Wylie Agency and Odyssey
Editions (distributes electronic versions of books he represents through
Amazon.com)....Wylie remains a rare optimist in publishing circles,
fueled perhaps by the healthy backlists and literary estates he
represents. Information technology may be upending business models, but
he believes the global interconnection these advancements permit
provides immense opportunities for his authors....The devaluation of
quality editing and writing is sad and it's inevitable. Each house has a
large number of titles to publish, and with a difficult economy, fewer
people to handle the publications. But publishers need to become
smaller, leaner, and they will have to learn new disciplines. The whole
one-year publication process must be reduced.

opportunity for Igloo?? Michael Levine
literary_agents  publishing  Michael_Levine  globalization  talent_representation  talent_management  digital_media  Andrew_Wylie 
june 2011 by jerryking
Mobile App Talent Pool Is Shallow - WSJ.com
APRIL 15, 2011 | WSJ | Joe Light. Companies Scramble for Engineers Who Can Write Software for Smartphones.
talent_management  mobile_applications  talent_pools 
april 2011 by jerryking
Licence to deal
Mark Medley, National Post · Saturday, Dec. 13, 2008.

An agent’s job description. An agent is a writer’s primary advocate and
chief negotiator (“You are the paycheque,” says Bruce Westwood, founder
of Westwood Creative Artists). An agent will scout new talent; mentor a
writer; mediate problems between author and publisher and, if necessary,
find a new publisher; suggest new sources of income, for example
speaking engagements; and sell foreign rights as well as television,
film and stage rights.

“It’s not just selling the book and doing the deal and leaving them at
the door of their publishing company,” says Jackie Kaiser, who works at
Westwood. “As an agent, I have an interest in helping my writers
understand how they can best navigate the entire publishing process.”
literary_agents  publishing  Michael_Levine  books  scouting  talent_management  digital_media  talent_representation  talent_scouting 
january 2011 by jerryking
Foreign scholarships and the risky business of innovating - The Globe and Mail
Nov. 16, 2010 / Globe and Mail / Editorial. Neil Turok,
director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo,
Ont., which sets out to attract some of the world’s top scientific
minds, told The Globe and Mail’s editorial board yesterday, “Because the
rest of the world is in relative difficulty financially, now is the
time to attract global talent. Canada has an amazing opportunity.” A
good case, a difficult sell. Innovation means trying something that
can’t be proven in advance, as Roger Martin, dean of the University of
Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, says. The foreign scholarships
are a investment with a strong upside, and a high risk that is mostly
political.
Colleges_&_Universities  innovation  Ontario  scholarships  risks  talent_management  Rotman  editorials  Perimeter_Institute  political_risk  poaching  Kitchener-Waterloo  upside  high-risk  Roger_Martin  foreign_scholarships  war_for_talent 
november 2010 by jerryking
Why boardrooms are not all rock 'n' roll
Nov 1, 2010|FT|Philip Broughton.Managing creative people is
difficult,not just because creativity is rare and the people who possess
it chafe at being managed but because establishing a mkt for creative
work is one of the hardest things to do in business.VCs know this when
they install seasoned executives to guide young founders (e.g.Eric
Schmidt @ Google & Sheryl Sandberg @ Facebook).Similarly, Hollywood
often pairs a hard-headed business type with a creative genius.Steven
Spielberg's career took off under the guidance of Sid Sheinberg, a
fierce lawyer who ran MCA/ Universal.Book publishing's best-known agent,
Andrew Wylie, is nicknamed "the Jackal" for his tenacity on behalf of
clients...The Stones required 3 very different kinds of manager:(1) to
validate them within a highly competitive industry & establish them
in the public eye;(2)to usher them into the big time; and (3) to build a
protective fort around their steady-state operations & ensure their
L.T. survival & profitability.
ProQuest  Philip_Delves_Broughton  creative_types  rollingstones  autobiographies  Keith_Richards  music_industry  partnerships  talent_management  Andrew_Wylie  Hollywood  pairs 
november 2010 by jerryking
How to Hire a VP of Sales
September 21, 2010 | Harvard Business Review | by Steve
W. Martin. Give to Noel for pitching M.O. on his services. This article
specifically references the impact that a sales leader can have on a
start-up like Brand Celebration. For a small business in build mode,
Monster.ca & Workopolis can't necessarily provide Brand Celebration
with the calibre of thought leadership on display here when it comes to
hiring a sales lead.. ... The VP of Sales is one of the most important
people within a company because this person is in charge of an
organization's most critical assets: customers and the revenue they
generate.
howto  HBR  hiring  recruiting  executive_management  talent_management  sales 
september 2010 by jerryking
How Foreign Companies Can Compete in China - WSJ.com
AUG. 23, 2010 | WSJ | By DENIS F. SIMON AND LEONARD M. FULD.
Prepare to Be Surprised in China. The 1 thing companies can count on is
that things are constantly changing. There are 3 critical—and perhaps
unexpected—competitive issues to be mastered. FLUIDITY: the biggest
challenge facing foreign companies in China is the constantly shifting
business environment. This fluidity stems from several factors:
Enforcement of rules and regulations in China can vary widely by
location and change without warning; partners routinely abandon
contracts for better offers; and new competitors can emerge and become
major threats almost overnight. And because information doesn't flow
freely, anticipating the direction and thrust of change can be
problematic, even for the most seasoned of managers with yrs. of
experience working in China. WTO FALLOUT: China's accession to the WTO
actually has made competing in China more difficult for foreign
companies. TALENT SHORTAGE:
China  ksfs  WTO  talent_management  competitive_strategy  constant_change  fluidity 
august 2010 by jerryking
6 most common errors in guiding high potentials and how to avoid them:
May 17, 2010 | Globe & Mail | HARVEY SCHACHTER. In Harvard
Business Review, researchers Jean Martin and Conrad Schmidt look at the
six most common errors in guiding high potentials and how to avoid
them:
Harvey_Schachter  advice  managing_people  management_development  HBR  shortcomings  talent_management  high-achieving 
august 2010 by jerryking
Corner Office - Always Thank Your Star Players, Chegg’s C.E.O. Says - Interview - NYTimes.com
July 9, 2010 | NYT | This interview with Dan Rosensweig,
president and chief executive of Chegg, was conducted and condensed by
Adam Bryant. Chegg rents textbooks online and by mail.
leadership  CEOs  online  Chegg  textbooks  e-commerce  rentals  gratitude  talent_management 
july 2010 by jerryking
Fifteen Percent of Immortality
July-August 2010 | Harvard Magazine | by Craig A. Lambert ’69,
Ph.D. ’78, is deputy editor of this magazine. Profile of literary
agent Andrew Wylie, who aims for the high end—financial and literary.
publishing  writing  literary_agents  talent_management  high-end  digital_media  Andrew_Wylie  Harvard  talent_representation 
july 2010 by jerryking
GENERAL ELECTRIC: AN OUTLIER IN CEO TALENT DEVELOPMENT
January/February 2009 | Ivey Business Journal | by Glenn Rowe and Roderick E. White and Derek Lehmberg and John R. Phillips
GE  corporate_universities  CEOs  leadership_development  talent_management  Freshbooks  Crotonville 
october 2009 by jerryking
Leader Machines
Oct 1, 2007 | Fortune | Geoff Colvin. The best young employees
are hungry for leadership development. Companies are finding that the
advantages of building a reputation for developing talent are greater
than they may have thought. A close look at the companies on our list
reveals a set of best practices that seem to work in any environment: 1.
Invest time and money. 2. identify promising leaders early. 3. Choose
assignments strategically. 4. Develop leaders within their current jobs.
5. Be passionate about feedback and support. 6. Develop teams, not just
individuals. 7. Exert leadership through inspiration. 8. Encourage
leaders to be active in their communities. 9. Make leadership
development part of the culture.
Geoff_Colvin  Employer_of_Choice  leadership  organizational_culture  Freshbooks  onboarding  talent_management  reputation  leadership_development  Crotonville  CEOs 
september 2009 by jerryking
The Best Places to Launch a Career
September 4, 2008, | Business Week | by Lindsey Gerdes.
The Best Places to Launch a Career
To lure and keep young talent when cash is tight, companies of all
stripes are appealing to Gen Yers' ambitions for speedy advancement—and
their desire to do good while doing well
Managing_Your_Career  onboarding  talent_management  Freshbooks  Colleges_&_Universities  new_graduates 
september 2009 by jerryking
The Best Places to Launch a Career
September 3, 2009 | Business Week | By Lindsey Gerdes.
Graduates lucky enough to land a job may find the prospect of
responsibility and rapid advancement surprisingly strong. But don't
count on bigger salaries!

By Lindsey Gerdes
Colleges_&_Universities  Managing_Your_Career  Freshbooks  onboarding  talent_management  new_graduates 
september 2009 by jerryking
America’s Secret Innovation Weapon - Immigration - NYTimes.com
July 4, 2009 | New York Times | By MIKE SPEISER. Argues that
it is time for a more strategic and aggressive U.S. immigration policy,
one that targets the best and brightest around the globe and makes it
easy for them to become permanent residents. The U.S. should be
recruiting the world’s best talent the same way top companies recruit
the best talent.
immigration  policy  innovation  strategic  talent_management  immigrants  special_sauce  the_best_and_brightest 
july 2009 by jerryking
Corner Office - He Wants Subjects, Verbs and Objects - Question - NYTimes.com
April 25, 2009 | New York Times | Interview of Richard
Anderson, chief executive of Delta Air Lines, conducted and condensed by
Adam Bryant.
airline_industry  CEOs  lessons_learned  words  talent_management  leadership  hiring  Communicating_&_Connecting 
april 2009 by jerryking
Succession Planning Is Over-Rated
November 5, 2007 blog post in Adam Smith on

Few individuals are likely to possess all the characteristics sought by
Wall Street institutions or law firms.

As for what matters most, I defer to Dennis Weatherstone, former
chairman of J.P. Morgan, who is given the last word in the Journal
article: Granted, he says, "the number of candidates for these
positions is somewhat limited" and experience is "always valuable." But
he sees the key in something else: It's more important, he avers, to
find a CEO who can "anticipate change." And maybe the one best able to
anticipate change is one who has less of a vested interest in the status
quo. Just a thought.
succession  talent_management  leadership  law_firms  anticipating  CEOs  Bruce_MacEwen  status_quo  experience  industry_expertise  change  overrated  what_really_matters 
april 2009 by jerryking
FT.com / Wealth - Language skills prove an asset
August 13 2007 22:08 | Financial Times | By Lauren Foster in
New York

In July 2007 – nearly eight months after the deal was announced – BofA
completed the acquisition and announced its business serving wealthy
clients would be called US Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth
Management.
high_net_worth  private_banking  talent_management  linguistics  languages 
april 2009 by jerryking
The Myth of the Lone Star: Why One Top Performer May Not Shine as Brightly as You Hope - WSJ.com
MARCH 23, 2009 | Wall Stree Journal | by BORIS GROYSBERG ,
LINDA-ELING LEE AND ROBIN ABRAHAMS.

# CREATING KNOWLEDGE:
# PROVIDING FEEDBACK:
# DELIVERING PRODUCTS AND SERVICES TO CLIENTS:
# ENHANCING REPUTATIONS:
# BOTTOM LINE: "no-jerks" policy. Maintain top people in different
functions throughout the firm, not clustered in a single function.
Hiring, developing, motivating and retaining good people remains the
best security.
talent_management  hiring 
march 2009 by jerryking
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