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jerryking : target_marketing   19

Ad Giant Wins Over Disney With Big Data Pitch
Oct. 15, 2019 | The New York Times | By Tiffany Hsu.

Advertising pitches have come a long way since the 1960s, when creative teams tried to impress potential clients with snappy slogans, catchy jingles and arresting visuals while pledging to attract the housewife segment or the businessman demographic.

These days, big companies look to ad companies for their data smarts as much as their marketing expertise. The agencies with the most persuasive pitches are those that have increasingly personalized data on the patterns and preferences of a broad range of consumers.

Disney already has plenty of data on its customers. But the prospect of precisely targeting potential moviegoers, theme-park visitors, hotel guests and subscribers for its coming Disney Plus streaming service appealed to the company, according to two people familiar with the pitch process.

While the Disney-Publicis deal may benefit both companies, some worry that it may put consumer privacy at risk.

“This is in essence creating a data broker division to Disney, expanding what Disney already knows, which is a lot,” said Jeffrey Chester, the executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy, a nonprofit consumer advocacy group. “You’re telling your entire life history to Mickey Mouse.”

On Nov. 12, the Disney will start its streaming challenger to Netflix, Disney Plus.
In North America, Publicis will take charge of media strategy for the Disney Plus streaming service as well as Disney resorts and amusement parks. Epsilon was a major draw because of the extremely detailed data it has compiled. The company may very well know if you are lactose intolerant or are in the market for a pickup truck with 60,000 miles on it. If you are into astrology or have taken out a home-equity loan, it may know that too. Epsilon could, for example, beam a Disney Plus ad to parents who have bought a Lion King costume for their toddler.....“They have the capacity to really understand who is a likely prospect for the streaming service and where that person resides online, and they can send messages in the appropriate media to that individual,” .....most of the advertising industry is struggling to compete against Facebook and Google, analysts said. The platforms dominate the business of buying and selling digital ads, leaving the agencies little room to negotiate. Facebook and Google have also started working directly with many advertising clients, luring them away from traditional ad companies.

In leaning on data to improve its fortunes, Publicis is part of a larger industry trend. Dentsu bought a majority stake in the data marketing firm Merkle Group in 2016, and Interpublic Group bought the data marketing firm Acxiom in 2018.....a “huge consolidation” within advertising that has allowed huge holding companies to gobble up agencies and data companies that are increasingly looking for ways to advertise using personal data.

He said that viewership data from the ad-free Disney Plus, including details involving children, could be passed on to Epsilon, which could use the information to target consumers with marketing for other Disney offerings.

“It’s Madison Avenue bringing you Silicon Valley,”
advertising  advertising_agencies  analytics  big_bets  data  Disney  Epsilon  Madison_Avenue  marketing  Omnicom  personal_data  pitches  privacy  Publicis  Silicon_Valley  streaming  target_marketing  theme_parks 
october 2019 by jerryking
Vertical media mergers are just so 19th century | Financial Times
June 21, 2018 | Financial Times | Anne-Marie Slaughter.

Media companies are falling over themselves to merge with one another right now. AT&T took the US to court over the right to buy TimeWarner, and Comcast and Disney are engaged in a bidding war for some of 21st Century Fox. Big looks set to get bigger. Yet according to our best thinkers on the future of capitalism, the corporate titans driving these decisions are heading firmly backward.

AT&T and Comcast are communications companies that are attempting to go vertical and control every layer of a media empire from underground cables to the creation of content....Andrew Carnegie was determined to own coal mines and railroads as well as steel mills. The goal was control from top to bottom, closed access and economies of scale.

But that is old-fashioned thinking, according to the current crop of books on the dramatic economic changes being wreaked in the next phase of the information age. They argue that vertical integration amounts to building silos in an era that will be dominated by platforms — owning in an era of renting — and looking for mass markets when customers want individualized products.

Hemant Taneja makes a strong case for “customised microproduction and finely targeted marketing” in his book Unscaled. An investor for the Boston-based firm General Catalyst, he does not question the value of having many customers rather than few. But he argues that fast-growing companies in sectors ranging from energy to healthcare and education are succeeding because they customise their goods and services to a “market of one”.

The rise of artificial intelligence and cloud computing allows these companies to “rent scale”, he writes. Small, nimble companies can now out-compete big ones in specific markets, adding scale as they need to.....Netflix’s market value exceeded that of Comcast back in May and it is now bigger than Disney. Its global headcount is 5,500, nearly one-fifth of Time Warner’s and one-50th of AT&T’s. Netflix does not have the size to build as large in-house AI capabilities. But a quick search for “media data analytics” reveals a score of companies. Why pay for that capability when you can rent it
Andrew_Carnegie  Anne-Marie_Slaughter  artificial_intelligence  books  cloud_computing  end_of_ownership  entertainment_industry  Netflix  platforms  scaling  size  vertical_integration  AT&T  Comcast  customization  Disney  gazelles  nimbleness  mass_media  personalization  mergers_&_acquisitions  21st_Century_Fox  Time_Warner  19th_century  microproducers  target_marketing  unscalability  silo_mentality 
june 2018 by jerryking
Advertisers Try New Tactics to Break Through to Consumers - WSJ
By SUZANNE VRANICA
June 19, 2016

companies are rewriting their marketing playbooks. Some are blurring the line between advertising and content, in the hopes of passing through the filter of what consumers actually see and read. Others are diving deeper into data and location targeting on the theory that consumers will embrace ads that they find relevant.......Marketers have been drawn to digital advertising because of the promise of targeting consumers with more precision. But the backlash over the quantity and intrusiveness of digital marketing, and the adoption of ad blockers, is forcing them to figure out other ways to capture users’ attention......Advertisers like Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC are embracing so-called native ads, which seamlessly blend into a user’s feed and are harder to distinguish from editorial content.

“Native ads have 50% higher click-through rates than any of our [display] banner inventory,” ....Alison Lewis, chief marketing officer of J&J’s consumer business, said that for decades, the company would create two 30-second TV spots, two billboard ads and five print ads every year. That is “not how the world works today,” she said.
advertising  offensive_tactics  Johnson_&_Johnson  Netflix  content  backlash  location_based_services  Coldwell_Banker  marketing  precision  target_marketing  playbooks 
february 2017 by jerryking
Behind Martin Sorrell’s Data Binge - CMO Today - WSJ
Mar 12, 2015 | WSJ | By NATHALIE TADENA.

Sorrell, this is about putting his sprawling holding company in control of all the various data marketers are demanding nowadays to make sense of their ad campaigns. They want to know a lot about who is viewing. They want to know which TV shows or Web sites are ideal to reach their desired audience. And ultimately, they want to know how much an ad contributes to an actual sale of a product or service.

By becoming a global data powerhouse, WPP hopes to help clients draw connections across different data sources, better target audiences and ultimately improve the effectiveness of their advertising dollars.
data_sources  Martin_Sorrell  WPP  mergers_&_acquisitions  ROI  CMOs  M&A  data  metrics  measurements  advertising_agencies  advertising  marketing  data_driven  targeting  target_marketing 
march 2015 by jerryking
Bell planning to use customers' data to target ads - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 22 2013 | The Globe and Mail | SUSAN KRASHINSKY.

Bell Canada is planning to use information about its customers’ accounts and Internet use to target ads to them.

The information Bell will be using includes Internet activity from both mobile devices and computers, including Web pages customers have visited and search terms they have entered; customers’ location; use of apps and other device features; television viewing habits; and “calling patterns.” Account information shared will include product use including type of device, payment patterns, language preferences, postal codes, and demographic information.
Susan_Krashinsky  Bell_Canada  data  data_driven  data_mining  demographic_information  massive_data_sets  target_marketing  behavioural_targeting  online_behaviour  metadata 
november 2013 by jerryking
Advertising: Weather Channel Now Also Forecasts What You'll Buy - WSJ.com
August 14, 2013 | WSJ | By KATHERINE ROSMAN

Weather Channel Now Also Forecasts What You'll Buy
Company's Data Helps Fine-Tune When and Where Advertisers Should Place Spots. For Charles Waud
weather  massive_data_sets  advertising  targeting  target_marketing 
august 2013 by jerryking
How Canadian companies can tap into Asia’s consumer boom
Jun. 03 2013 | G&M | by DOMINIC BARTON.

Possible send to Earl Davis of Teachers.

To capture this opportunity, Canadian companies need an intimate understanding of the new Asian consumers. First, on the consumption and services front, they need to locate these consumers, with forensic precision....Second, Canadian companies need to understand the diverse and evolving tastes of Asian consumers. Across the region, the number of higher income households is rapidly expanding. These consumers are often young, are more international in their outlook, and are more willing to pay a premium for quality products. They consume more services, from education and health care to foreign travel....Third, Another significant opportunity for Canada is the provision and delivery of food, energy, and natural resources. By 2030, global demand for food is expected to rise by more than 25 per cent, mostly in Asia, and fertilizer demand will grow by 50 per cent.
Dominic_Barton  McKinsey  China  Canadian  target_marketing  consumer_behavior  shifting_tastes  China_rising  booming  Asia  Asian  Asia_Pacific  BRIC  middle_class  inland  affluence  infrastructure  forensics 
june 2013 by jerryking
Advertisers zeroing in on where, as well as who, you are
Apr. 04 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Susan Krashinsky.

The typical response rate for one of these campaigns is about 1 per cent. The location-specific campaign increased that by 400 per cent on average.

“There’s been a wholesale change in the amount …of data available and the tools available to actually understand it. It’s turning that data into knowledge that is the biggest task,” Mr. Okrucky said.

In an age where we transmit data from devices in our pockets many times a day, using information such as postal code profiles, housing statistics, and demographics by district may seem like an old-fashioned marketing tactic. And it is. But the processing of that information is changing rapidly: the ability to sort through massive data sets, to cross-reference them, and create detailed targets, has accelerated.

“It really gets to the cloud computing capability. We do programs with all these data sets very quickly. And some of the data sets can be absolutely massive,” said Phil Kaszuba, vice-president and general manager at DMTI.
Susan_Krashinsky  location  location_based_services  personalization  target_marketing  CDC  flu_outbreaks  massive_data_sets  advertising  data  databases  online_behaviour  behavioural_targeting  Aimia  LBMA  DMTI  specificity  response_rates  cloud_computing 
april 2013 by jerryking
Appealing to the unchurched: What attracts new members?
2002 | Journal of Nonproñt & Public Sector Marketing | by Barbara Carrick Coleman.

With an increase in competition, churches cannot afford to try to be all things to all people. Successful churches will target specific age segments and tailor their programs to appeal to members of those segments. Moreover, the importance of word-of­mouth cannot be overstated. Personal contact is the most persuasive means of attracting new members. Social programs that
welcome visitors are another means of attracting them to weekly services. In addition, the physical environment of the church also impacts individuals' first impressions and motivates them to act. Of the mass media, listings in the Yellow Pages are essential. Messages that are placed in mass media vehicles should focus on people issues, such as opportunities to meet and share common concems and interests.
churches  marketing  Word-of-mouth  target_marketing  memberships  religion 
january 2013 by jerryking
Segmentation - Back to School: Connecting With College Students :
September 28, 2004 | Marketing Profs | by Robert F. Hogeboom |

here are seven strategies that reflect the unique culture of college students:

Communicate lifestyle, not age relevance: Speaking to college students' age ("You're in college, obtain your first credit card") is ineffective, because it does not inspire them or grab their attention. Marketers must create a link between their brand and students' lifestyle, which includes attending concerts and movies, snowboarding on weekends, eating at off-campus restaurants, traveling and more. Remember: college students don't just study and attend class all day—they are extremely active.

Attach your brand name to current trends: Snowboarding, surfing, skateboarding, underground rock bands, rock concert festivals and the ESPN XGames are considered "cool" among the college student market. Businesses can attach their brand name to these activities, events, products and associations that have earned "street-cred" among the student market, and thus share in their emotional appeal.

Tap into students' emotional needs for empowerment, privilege, and status: College students are attracted to goods and services that empower them as consumers and individuals. Examples include the Internet, mobile phones, MP3 players, online file sharing and credit cards. Additionally, products and services that enhance social status are successful at winning students over.

Don't try too hard to win students over: College students greet most product claims with skepticism. Students are aware that they are a highly desirable market. They don't want to be overtly sold or pitched. Instead, they simply want to be educated about products and services and told how the offering matches their unique needs.

Reach students at key transitional periods: At certain transitional periods, college students exhibit a need for certain products and services. It's a marketer's job to reach students at these points of need. Key transitional periods for college students include the beginning of freshman year, summer breaks, moving to off-campus living, studying abroad and graduation.

Become an authentic brand: Ad-weary and marketing-savvy college students value authentic brands. Authentic brands exhibit the following characteristics:

• They develop trust among potential customers—trust is the foundation of brand authenticity.

• They are perceived as not trying too hard to sell or actively win customers over.

• They continually deliver value and convince students that they have students' best interests at heart.

Play-it-straight: College students immediately sense hype and do not accept brands that they consider fake.

Read more: http://www.marketingprofs.com/4/hogeboom1.asp#ixzz203iwNgRt
market_segmentation  Colleges_&_Universities  students  lifestyles  branding  leisure  marketing  tips  target_marketing  authenticity  transitions 
july 2012 by jerryking
Small Firms Can Survive Squeeze By Revamping Marketing Efforts - WSJ.com
January 28, 2003 | WSJ | By JEFF BAILEY | Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Small Firms Can Survive Squeeze By Revamping Marketing Efforts
(1) Measure your results.
(2) Building a brand is different from closing a sale. (In marketing your firm, decide whether broad-based brand awareness is a goal or whether you're merely looking for that next sale)
(3) Think narrow.
(4) You're not too small
small_business  sales  marketing  metrics  target_marketing  branding  measurements  narrow-framing 
may 2012 by jerryking
The Vanishing Mass Market
July 12, 2004 | BW Online | Anthony Bianco.

P&G now is standing mass marketing on its head by shifting emphasis from selling to the vast, anonymous crowd to selling to millions of particular consumers. "You find the people. You are very focused on them," Stengel says. "You become relevant to them."..."We are a big marketer," says M. Lawrence Light, McDonald's chief marketing officer, echoing Stengel's disavowals. "We are not a mass marketer."

For marketers, the evolution from mass to micromarketing is a fundamental change driven as much by necessity as opportunity...Figuring out the right way to send the right message to the right person at the right time is difficult work. It is also risky, not unlike hunting game birds with a high-powered rifle instead of a shotgun. If you miss, you miss entirely.
marketing  P&G  micro-markets  permission_marketing  target_marketing  advertising  niches  McDonald's  personalization  Jim_Stengel  the_right_people 
april 2012 by jerryking
Hot New Marketing Trends
August 2006 | Entrepreneur Magazine | By Gwen Moran. Go
Online:
"Think globally, act locally" is now the mantra for entrepreneurs
advertising online. Online ad spending is up as much as 33 percent over
last year, says David J. Moore, chairman and CEO of digital marketing
firm 24/7 Real Media Inc. in New York City. Earlier this year, Google
announced a new local advertising program linked to its map service and
AdWords program, allowing businesses to drive some of Google's traffic
to their brick-and-mortar locations.

"[Entrepreneurs] should pay attention to any targeting that allows them
to increase advertising efficiency by reaching users in their particular
geographic area," says Moore. Online ads are also migrating to podcasts
and blogs, where advertisers can reach very specific niche audiences.
And with increased access to broadband and the falling cost of video
production, Moore foresees a rise in online video ads for businesses as
well.
marketing  trends  local_advertising  City_Voice  targeting  target_marketing  bricks-and-mortar  web_video  pay_attention 
july 2010 by jerryking
Are Charity Fundraisers Spying on You?
May 18, 2010 | SmartMoney Magazine | by Anne Kadet. Donor
research isn’t new, of course. In a bygone era, fund-raising sleuths
spent days at the library and county clerk’s office, scribbling facts on
index cards. More recently, major charities have spent large sums on
donor data to prepare for capital campaigns. But now, for as little as
$3,000 a year, even smaller nonprofits—like the Cape Cod Commercial Hook
Fishermen’s Association—can use databases that estimate everything from
a donor’s net worth to the size of her mortgage. According to nonprofit
marketing-research firm Campbell Rinker, nearly half of all charities
now use these tools to research donors.
privacy  charities  target_marketing  scuttlebutt  hospitals  nonprofit  fundraising  data_mining  high_net_worth  personal_finance  estate_planning 
may 2010 by jerryking

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