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20 Minutes With: Bridge International Academies’ Shannon May
Feb. 25, 2019 | Barron's | By Mitch Moxley.

Bridge International Academies, a private company May co-founded that transforms failing government schools into high performing ones. The results have been astounding. May, an Arizona native in her early 40s, oversees the education of more than a quarter of a million children every school day in six countries. On average, these schools charge just US$7 per month per child, and some graduates have gone to elite secondary schools in the U.S.

Bridge is backed by Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg, among others, and has raised over US$140 million.

What was the original goal when you launched Bridge?

The original goal, seriously, was to serve a million kids in more than 1,000 schools…. It’s a lot harder than we thought, but 10 years on, now we’re working with close to 300,000 kids every day in six different countries.
billgates  China  education  high-achieving  PhDs  teachers  teaching  scaling  schools  transformational 
february 2019 by jerryking
A beloved tutor and social administrator Sheila George, MS, is a ‘Special Person’ – Kaieteur News
Nov 28, 2010 News 0 Comments




Mme. Sheila George

“I think you just have to do the best you can wherever you are.”

By Crystal Conway
BHS  teachers  Guyanese  Guyana 
july 2016 by jerryking
Violently Wrought, Kaitlyn Greenidge interviews Marlon James - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics
Kaitlyn Greenidge interviews Marlon James
November 3, 2014

Guernica: When you are inside the big book, how do you map out structure?

Marlon James: I have note sheets. I use Moleskine notebooks. I’m analog like that. I have a plot chart. I have different columns for the character, rows with different times of day, because even though it’s a big book, each chapter takes place basically in a day. So I need to know where Nina Burgess is at nine o’clock, and where she’ll be at ten. It allows me to be spontaneous. It’s sort of like how knowing prosody really liberates a poet.

If you know you have a backbone, you can bend and contort. That’s what allowed a lot of the freedom in the book. Because half of that stuff in that chart I didn’t follow. Because characters become real and they don’t take crap from you. But also because I always knew where the return line was. You can always go so far out on a limb and know you have to come back to this point. Plot charts and diagramming also stopped me from playing favorites. Because everybody had to get equal time.
Marlon_James  writers  Caribbean  culture  violence  fiction  books  Jamaica  '70s  profile  authors  teachers  Bob_Marley  writing  analog  spontaneity  Moleskine  plot_charts  diagramming  Man_Booker  prizes 
january 2016 by jerryking
Ontario paid total of $2.5-million to teachers’ unions
The Ontario government secretly paid $1-million to a second teachers’ union to buy labour peace, The Globe and Mail has learned. The province agreed to give the Ontario English Catholic…
Teachers  education  privatization  negotiations  unions 
october 2015 by jerryking
To Sir, with cynicism
Sep. 04 2000 | - The Globe and Mail | KATHLEEN GALLAGHER.

Where have all the idealistic young teachers gone?

We're coming perilously close to losing them. ...... I sense a different mood. Last September, when I faced my OISE class, I began the year with a simple question: "When you shared your decision to become a teacher with the people in your life who love you, what did they say?" The answers were ambivalent at best.

With teacher-shortage terror sweeping the country, teacher candidates .......very concerned, about what their lives will look like and how they will cope with low morale in the schools. They are concerned, too, by suggestions about their inability to teach to acceptable national standards......At a time of teacher-bashing and formidable moves to bring back more rigid standards, Hollywood asks us to put our hope in hero-teachers, teachers who take on the authorities, parents, and other "bad" (jaded, tired, cynical) teachers, in order to transform the lives of unhappy, unlucky children.

I worry about the superhuman qualities that these movies tell us make "good teachers." Unlike Meryl Streep, my student teachers will not have a swelling soundtrack underscoring their actions when they find themselves facing program cutbacks and the cynicism of colleagues. Everyone loses when teaching becomes an act of individual heroism. We make schools unhappier places when we tell new teachers they're on their own, rather than encouraging them to join with experienced teachers who have developed strategies, over time, to contend with the manifold contradictory expectations placed on them.....What critics of public schools seem not to know (and what good teachers have always known) is that people generally play the roles we assign them. If we worsen conditions in classrooms -- too many students, fewer support staff -- and add affronts to teachers' professionalism, we will inevitably lead teachers to develop lower expectations of themselves. The result will be the corrosion of a truly noble profession.
Colleges_&_Universities  contradictions  cynicism  demoralization  expectations  high_schools  idealism  letters_to_the_editor  OISE  public_education  public_schools  teaching  teachers  unhappiness 
february 2015 by jerryking
It Takes a Mentor -
SEPT. 9, 2014 | NYTimes.com | Thomas L. Friedman.

Successful students had one or more teachers who were mentors and took a real interest in their aspirations, and they had an internship related to what they were learning in school.

“We think it’s a big deal” where we go to college, Busteed explained to me. “But we found no difference in terms of type of institution you went to — public, private, selective or not — in long-term outcomes. How you got your college education mattered most.”

Graduates who told Gallup that they had a professor or professors “who cared about them as a person — or had a mentor who encouraged their goals and dreams and/or had an internship where they applied what they were learning — were twice as likely to be engaged with their work and thriving in their overall well-being,”
mentoring  Tom_Friedman  ksfs  students  Colleges_&_Universities  teachers  college-educated 
september 2014 by jerryking
Four Ways to Spot a Great Teacher - WSJ
By DANA GOLDSTEIN
Updated Sept. 4, 2014

Great teachers:

• Have active intellectual lives outside their classrooms.

• Believe intelligence is achievable, not inborn.

• Are data-driven.

• Ask great questions.
education  howto  teaching  teachers  questions  best_of 
september 2014 by jerryking
Real estate agent’s school opinions spark firestorm in GTA
Sep. 08 2013 |- The Globe and Mail |by GREG McARTHUR.

Although it’s not unusual for real estate agents to post test scores on their websites, Ms. Kostyniuk, has gone two steps further, devising her own methodology for ranking schools and then offering her candid opinions, often on video. Her system, she says, is supposed to take into account socio-economic factors to make the rankings fairer, but instead she has sparked a firestorm on websites popular with educators. While she is applauded by the likes of the Fraser Institute for trying to measure school performance, lawyers with the Peel District School Board are discussing how they can persuade her to cease and desist publishing her ranking system. “I think we’re going to appeal to her sense of good taste and respect and ask her to not do this to our schools,” said the board’s director of communications, Brian Woodland....Her rankings rely primarily on the standardized tests administered by Ontario’s Education Quality and Accountability Office, but with a few twists. In an effort to identify underrated schools, she created what she calls the Teacher Difficulty Index.

While filming herself in promotional videos outside many of Mississauga’s schools, she says she encountered teachers and principals who revealed to her the four main factors that make a teacher’s job more difficult: lower household income levels, parental education, the number of single parent households in the neighbourhood and the number of ESL students. She purchased data about these factors from a polling company, and using a formula – she previously worked as a geomorphologist, her website says – came up with a list of schools that she believes are environments where it is more difficult to teach. From there she developed a “potency list” – schools that perform better than they should given the socio-economic factors in their neighbourhood.
real_estate  education  schools  performance  Mississauga  indices  underrated  data  ranked_list  standardized_testing  teachers  school_districts  rankings  data_driven  test-score_data  outperformance  creating_valuable_content 
september 2013 by jerryking
Seven characteristics of great education systems
Sep. 02 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Editorials.
"Smartest Kids in the World"
* Mathematics is vital. Math is even more important than we knew. Math skills correlate highly with future income, and with academic success, research shows.
* Teachers should be highly prized. It should be difficult to become a teacher, and the job should be socially prestigious. Students, parents and bureaucrats respect teachers, because they know how hard it is to become one.
* Classroom technology is a waste of money. There’s no indication that fancy pedagogical doodads such as electronic whiteboards and tablets have a tangible effect on student performance.
* School should be about school. Rigour is key, and standards must be high.
* Extra help is widely available.
* Critical thinking is emphasized.
* No system is perfect. There are union squabbles, dissatisfied parents, policy shortcomings and rampant inefficiencies in even the highest-performing education systems.
books  education  howto  editorials  high_schools  ksfs  Finland  rigour  teachers  inefficiencies  mathematics  prestige 
september 2013 by jerryking
Need a Job? Invent It
March 30, 2013 | NYTimes.com | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

Tony Wagner, the Harvard education specialist, describes his job today, he says he’s “a translator between two hostile tribes” — the education world and the business world, the people who teach our kids and the people who give them jobs. Wagner’s argument in his book “Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World” is that our K-12 and college tracks are not consistently “adding the value and teaching the skills that matter most in the marketplace.” ... I asked Wagner, what do young people need to know today?

“Every young person will continue to need basic knowledge, of course,” he said. “But they will need [transferable, hard & soft] skills and motivation even more. Of these three education goals, motivation is the most critical. Young people who are intrinsically motivated — curious, persistent, and willing to take risks — will learn new knowledge and skills continuously. They will be able to find new opportunities or create their own — a disposition that will be increasingly important as many traditional careers disappear.”...Reimagining schools for the 21st-century must be our highest priority. We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.” ...We need to focus more on teaching the skill and will to learn and to make a difference and bring the three most powerful ingredients of intrinsic motivation into the classroom: play, passion and purpose.”

What does that mean for teachers and principals?

“Teachers,” he said, “need to coach students to performance excellence, and principals must be instructional leaders who create the culture of collaboration required to innovate. But what gets tested is what gets taught, and so we need ‘Accountability 2.0.’ All students should have digital portfolios to show evidence of mastery of skills like critical thinking and communication, which they build up right through K-12 and postsecondary. Selective use of high-quality tests, like the College and Work Readiness Assessment, is important.
Tom_Friedman  books  students  education  life_skills  innovation  teaching  teachers  high_schools  K-12  motivations  play  purpose  transferable_skills  mindsets  intrinsically_motivated  passions  high-quality  tribes  young_people 
march 2013 by jerryking
Why America's hated: all that and more from your teachers union
December 6, 2001 | G&M – Page A25 | Margaret Wente

Doug Little teaches high-school history at Rosedale Heights in Toronto. He's
also the editor of his union newsletter, which goes out to 6,500 t...
Margaret_Wente  unions  anti-Americanism  schools  teachers  anti-Semitism  public_sector 
march 2013 by jerryking
Teachers’ unions are obsolete
Jan. 12 2013 | The Globe and Mail | Margaret Wente.
Wherever you live in Canada, whatever party your provincial government happens to belong to, strife in the schools is about to become a way of life. The public-sector pie is shrinking, and everybody on the public payroll will have to take a hit. That’s why Ontario’s education-friendly government cracked down on the teachers. If they’re not reined in, everybody else will fight back, too. More than 1.1-million people in Ontario – civil servants, social workers, nurses, teachers, police, garbage collectors – are on the public payroll; their collective paycheque amounts to around $58-billion a year.

The case for public-sector unions is arguable at the best of times. Public employees are supposed to behave in the public interest. But the more entrenched and powerful their unions become, the more money they are able to extract in the form of raises, bankable sick days, job security, generous pensions, rigid work rules, and the like. The unions’ job is to act in the interest of their members, which is inevitably contrary to the broader interests of the public. Politicians are happy to comply because the public purse is bottomless (until it’s not). Politicians are supposed to bargain on behalf of all the citizens. But the citizens don’t have unions.
Margaret_Wente  unions  Ontario  teachers  public_sector  Salman_Khan  Khan_Academy  Queen’s_Park 
january 2013 by jerryking
To transform education, Donorschoose hires a data scientist - Fortune Tech
By Jessi Hempel, writer December 21, 2012

Charles Best, a former Bronx history teacher, started Donorschoose to help donors and teachers connect directly online. Now Best plans to use a dozen years' worth of data to advocate for those educators. After all, teachers often turn to Donorschoose to request help getting the tools and supplies they need most. In the grand -- and often political -- struggle to identify what schools need, Best believes Donorschoose can help policy makers who control government spending listen to teachers. ...The idea for harnessing this data began when Donorschoose held a hacking contest in 2011. Among the most intriguing explorations of the data was a project done by Lisa Zhang, a Canadian undergraduate who used Donorschoose data to look at, among other things, the influence of a teacher's gender on the types of projects that were submitted and got funded....
education  data_driven  data_scientists  data  nonprofit  philanthropy  teachers  reform 
january 2013 by jerryking
How Schools Can Teach Innovation - WSJ.com
April 13, 2012 | WSJ | By TONY WAGNER.
Educating the Next Steve Jobs
How can schools teach students to be more innovative? Offer hands-on classes and don't penalize failure
education  students  innovation  failure  teaching  teachers  Steve_Jobs  high_schools 
april 2012 by jerryking
Wendy Kopp: The Trouble With Humiliating Teachers - WSJ.com
March 7, 2012 | WSJ | By WENDY KOPP.

Making rankings public undermines the trust educators need to build collaborative teams.
teachers  teaching  Teach_for_America  Wendy_Kopp  rankings  high_schools  humiliation  undermining_of_trust 
march 2012 by jerryking
How About Better Parents? - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Published: November 19, 2011

“The study found that getting parents involved with their children’s learning at home is a more powerful driver of achievement than parents attending P.T.A. and school board meetings, volunteering in classrooms, participating in fund-raising, and showing up at back-to-school nights.”
parenting  Tom_Friedman  testing  reading  teachers 
november 2011 by jerryking
The cost of silence
David Gladstone. The Globe and Mail. Toronto, Ont.: Nov 23, 2005. pg. A.18

For 25 years, I was a principal in the inner city of Toronto and, over all those years, one fact became very clear: Black mothers would not let their children be blamed by a white male authority figure without challenging that authority. A black mother would almost never admit that her child might have been in error in his or her behaviour.

However, I slowly began to understand why. There was no one else around to protect the black mother's child and it made no difference what the child did, the mother was not going to side with white authority against her child. Even when I used black teachers to discuss the issue with the mother, nothing changed.
ProQuest  letters_to_the_editor  African_Canadians  silence  teachers  criminality  murders  killings  deaths 
november 2011 by jerryking
Steven Brill: Super Teachers Alone Can't Save Our Schools - WSJ.com
AUGUST 13, 2011 | WSJ |By STEVEN BRILL

Super Teachers Alone Can't Save Our Schools
Extraordinary educators are rare and often burn out. To save our
schools, says Steven Brill, we have to demand more from ordinary
teachers and their unions....Reforming America's troubled education
system requires a new commitment to training teachers and holding them
accountable for their performance, says Steven Brill, author of "Class
Warfare: Inside the Fight to Fix America's Schools." But how do you push
them to perform without burning them out? And what role should the
unions play in this process? Brill discusses with Weekend Review Editor
Gary Rosen.
teaching  teachers  unions  charter_schools  Steven_Brill  accountability  books 
august 2011 by jerryking
Teaching for America - NYTimes.com
November 20, 2010 | new York TImes | By THOMAS L.
FRIEDMAN....Tony Wagner, the Harvard-based education expert and author
of “The Global Achievement Gap,” explains it this way. There are three
basic skills that students need if they want to thrive in a knowledge
economy: the ability to do critical thinking and problem-solving; the
ability to communicate effectively; and the ability to
collaborate......Wagner thinks we should create a West Point for
teachers:..if we want better teachers we also need better parents —
parents who turn off the TV and video games, make sure homework is
completed, encourage reading and elevate learning as the most important
life skill. The more we demand from teachers the more we have to demand
from students and parents. .
Teach_for_America  achievement_gaps  teachers  education  critical_thinking  collaboration  Communicating_&_Connecting  Tom_Friedman  students  ksfs  books 
november 2010 by jerryking
Review & Outlook: Joel Klein's Report Card - WSJ.com
NOVEMBER 11, 2010 | WSJ. A Democrat without education
experience when he became schools chancellor in 2002, Mr. Klein began as
a mainstream reformer. Raise standards, end social promotion, hire
better teachers, promote charter schools. But as he was mugged by the
reality of the K-12 public school establishment, he began to appreciate
that real improvement requires more than change at the margin.

Thus he led the fight for far more school choice by creating charter
school clusters, as in Harlem, that are changing the local culture of
failure. Kids from as far away as Buffalo will benefit from his fight to
lift the state charter cap, which increased to 460 schools from 200.
Mr. Klein helped to expose the "rubber rooms" that let bad teachers live
for years on the taxpayer dime while doing no work. He gave schools
grades from A to F and pushed to close the bad ones, and he fought for
merit pay in return for ending teacher tenure.
Joel_Klein  education  reform  standards  tenure  meritocratic  boldness  teachers  school_districts  grading  CEOs  lawyers  Michael_Bloomberg  charter_schools  K-12  public_schools 
november 2010 by jerryking
Michelle Rhee Is Out
Oct 13 2010 | The Atlantic | Ta-Nehisi Coates.“ I think a
better politician than Adrian Fenty would have handled this a lot more
deftly, and not allowed the teacher union's and "the community" to
effectively become synonymous. I strongly believe that an elected
officials job isn't simply to devise solutions, but also to get a
critical mass of the electorate to buy into those solutions.

I do not doubt the strength of the teacher's unions in the District. But
it's very hard for me to believe that among black parents grappling
with the problems of D.C. schools there isn't some crucial portion that
could have been peeled off. The inference that black District parents,
en masse, are somehow more interested in making sure teachers keep their
jobs, then they are in making sure their kids are able to secure jobs
of their own, doesn't ring true to me.“
Ta-Nehisi_Coates  Michelle_Rhee  exits  Washington_D.C.  Adrian_Fenty  public_schools  teacher's_unions  politicians  critical_mass  leaders  teachers  firings 
october 2010 by jerryking
What They're Doing After Harvard: The Weekend Interview with Wendy Kopp - WSJ.com
JULY 10, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By NAOMI SCHAEFER RILEY.
Teach for America now attracts 12% of all Ivy League seniors. The
program's founder explains why it beats working on Wall Street.
NaomiSchaeferRiley  Teach_for_America  Ivy_League  teaching  teachers  education  reform  Wall_Street 
july 2010 by jerryking
What Educators Are Learning From Money Managers
June 7, 2010 | Forbes Magazine | Daniel Fisher. "Away from the
angriest national debates, however, a quiet revolution in American
public education is occurring at organizations around the country like
Achievement First (see sidebar stories listed below). Most were launched
by idealistic liberals with dreams of social equality. But with annual
budgets exceeding $50 million, sophisticated computer systems and
hundreds of employees, they are starting to resemble
corporations--tracking and responding to minute changes and putting
resources to efficient and innovative uses. The question is whether
these strategies can be writ large, like Wal-Mart, to work in thousands
of schools with millions of students nationwide. There are plenty of
doubters."
school_districts  schools  data_driven  education  teachers  money_management 
may 2010 by jerryking
Corner Office - To the C.E.O. of Teach for America, Charisma Is Overrated - Question - NYTimes.com
July 4, 2009 | New York Times | Interview with Wendy Kopp,
founder and chief executive of Teach for America, conducted and
condensed by Adam Bryant. "For three years, every single payroll was a
huge question. But ultimately that near-death experience led us to see
the power of really clear, measurable goals."
leadership  managing_people  teachers  failure  metrics  overrated  goal-setting  CEOs  charisma  Teach_for_America  hiring  recruiting  measurements 
july 2009 by jerryking

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