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jerryking : teams   73

What will Apple do without Jony Ive?
June 27, 2019 | Financial Times | by Tim Bradshaw, Global Technology Correspondent.

Sir Jonathan prepares to move on from Apple to launch his own new venture, LoveFrom, after more than two decades at the Silicon Valley giant.....As a company worth nearly $1tn, Apple today is financially secure. But Sir Jonathan's looming departure will once again raise questions about its future. 

This is not the first time that Sir Jonathan’s role has evolved. In recent years, his design expertise has extended beyond crafting Apple’s pocketable devices. He helped retail chief Angela Ahrendts overhaul its stores, from fixtures such as its tree-lined “Genius Groves”, down to simplifying product packaging. 

More significantly, he oversaw the company’s long-planned move to its new headquarters, Apple Park, which was first conceived with Jobs back in 2004 and designed in partnership with British architects Foster + Partners.....Speaking at a Wired magazine event in 2018, he appeared to suggest that he was back for the long haul, saying: “There’s an awful lot to do and an awful lot of opportunity.” ....Apple Park...brought Apple’s entire design team together for the first time into one purpose-built studio, with industrial designers sitting side by side with font and interface designers......Perhaps the most important legacy that Jon Ive leaves . . . is the team.”.......By Apple’s outsized standards, the tight-knit group of people who work on product design is small. It runs to just a few dozen people out of an organisation that employs some 132,000 staff.....
Yet the team wields a disproportionate influence inside the Cupertino-based company. With an extensive array of tooling and fabrication equipment that is rarely found outside a manufacturing plant, the studio explores new product categories and the materials that might build them, from unique blends of aluminium to ceramics. 

They define not only a product’s appearance but how its software looks and feels, how it responds to gestures, even how an iPhone or Watch gently vibrates to give a user “haptic feedback”. 

“No group within Apple has more power than the industrial designers,” ......Jonathan Ive has thousands of patents to his name, encompassing the original iPod and iPhone to more obscure innovations, including the iPad’s magnetic cover, the Apple Store’s wooden tables and a lanyard used to attach an iPod to a wrist......Jonathan’s departure is likely to reopen a debate that has been simmering for several years — namely how will Apple come up with a new hit product that can match the unprecedented success of the iPhone, whose record-breaking profits propelled Apple to become the first trillion-dollar company last year........it may be that no single product ever will top the iPhone — for any tech company, not just Apple. It is a question that hangs over Silicon Valley as the industry casts around for a new platform, be it virtual reality or smart speakers, that might become as ubiquitous and essential as the smartphone.........Apple is also putting greater attention on an expanding portfolio of online services, including games, news and video........Tim Cook and Jonathan Ive have both pointed to healthcare as a potential new market for Apple, building on the Watch’s new capabilities for detecting heart irregularities.....Healthcare is just one example of how the battleground has changed for Apple in recent years. Despite pioneering virtual assistants with Siri, Apple found itself outflanked by Amazon’s Alexa and Google Assistant in both sales of smart speakers and artificial intelligence capabilities.

New blood at Apple

Some analysts believe that new blood could invigorate Apple’s response to these challenges. Alongside the high-profile departures of Ms Ahrendts and Sir Jonathan, Apple poached John Giannandrea from Google to become its head of machine learning and AI strategy, as well as Hollywood veterans Jamie Erlicht and Zack Van Amberg from Sony Pictures Television to run its push into original video. 

“The apparent acceleration in the pace of change within Apple at the executive level reflects the paradigm shift the company is undergoing from a hardware-driven story to ‘Apple as a service’,....... the most significant concern for investors will be that Sir Jonathan’s departure will take away another arbiter of focus and product direction that Apple had already lost with the death of Jobs.....Jonathan’s focus is growing beyond the steel and glass borders of Apple Park, saying he wants to “solve some complicated problems”. .....“One defining characteristics is almost a fanatical curiosity,” he said. “But if you don’t have the space, if you don’t have the tools and the infrastructure, that curiosity can often not have the opportunity to be pursued.”

LoveFrom itself defies traditional categorisation. “I have no interest in creating yet another design agency,” he said firmly. “What’s important is the values and what motivates that collection of people …Small groups of people, I think as Apple has demonstrated over the years, can do some extraordinary things.”

 

 

 
Alexa  Apple  Apple_IDs  Apple_Park  artificial_intelligence  breakthroughs  curiosity  design  departures  exits  Google_Assistant  haptics  healthcare  Jonathan_Ive  LoveFrom  new_categories  new_products  patents  services  Silicon_Valley  Siri  smart_speakers  subscriptions  teams  Tim_Cook  virtual_assistants 
june 2019 by jerryking
Slack aims to be ‘great connector’ ahead of US IPO
June 17, 2019 | Financial Times | by Richard Waters in San Francisco.
chat  collaboration  e-mail  grouping  mobile_applications  platforms  Slack  teams 
june 2019 by jerryking
How the modern office is killing our creativity
March 14, 2019 | | Financial Times | by Pilita Clark.

Roger Mavity and Stephen Bayley, the design guru, have published "How to Steal Fire", ....a book on one of the most eagerly sought qualities in the business world: creativity. Companies buffeted by a storm of digital disruption and competitive pressures have embraced the need for creative thinking with gusto in recent years, which marks a turnaround......CEOs have talked ....about the importance of innovation (i.e. the implementation of new ideas), but far less attention has been devoted to figuring out how to foster creativity itself.....“The first thing that helps creativity is solitude,” “Creativity is essentially an individual rather than a collective activity.” Sir Isaac Newton was a case in point....The great thoughts that helped him go on to formulate the theory of gravity came after the Great Plague closed his university (Cambridge) and he spent nearly two years shut away in his home in Lincolnshire......When he was running Microsoft, Bill Gates used to head off by himself to a secluded hideaway twice a year for what he called Think Week.....Mavity says: “If you need to produce an idea, isolating yourself can be enormously beneficial.”......“How you do that in a big open-plan office with 100 other people trying to be creative at the same time?.......Solitude is in hopelessly short supply at a time when companies are captivated by the financial allure of the open-plan office and its evil twin, hot-desking. ....The idea that great creative thoughts come from teamwork, brainstorming and the ever-present away day is one of the “great myths” of creativity......the Ringelmann effect, named after a French engineer, Max Ringelmann, who first observed that individual productivity falls as group size increases. Away days can be useful for helping people get to know each other better, but not for generating ideas, said Mr Mavity. As his book puts it: “Brainstorming produces, at best, a light, irritating drizzle of complacent mediocrity.”....smart companies understand the need for focused concentration....what should executives be doing to foster creativity?....“They have to walk the talk,” ....leaders need to set clear goals and then give people doing creative work the time, resources and autonomy to achieve them....Managers must be genuinely open to new thoughts and make sure good ideas are fostered. “None of it is rocket science or brain surgery,” “But you have to pay attention on a regular basis to whether people have these things.”
advertising  billgates  books  brainstorming  creativity  disruption  ergonomics  ideas  innovation  Isaac_Newton  myths  open-plan  pay_attention  solitude  teams  workplaces 
march 2019 by jerryking
Amazon offers cautionary tale of AI-assisted hiring
January 23, 2019 | Financial Times | by Andrew Hill.

the task of working out how to get the right people on the bus has got harder since 2001 when Jim Collins first framed it, as it has become clearer — and more research has underlined — that diverse teams are better at innovation. For good reasons of equity and fairness, the quest for greater balance in business has focused on gender, race and background. But these are merely proxies for a more useful measure of difference that is much harder to assess, let alone hire for: cognitive diversity. Might this knotty problem be solved with the help of AI and machine learning? Ming is sceptical. As she points out, most problems with technology are not technology problems, but human problems. Since humans inevitably inherit cultural biases, it is impossible to build an “unbiased AI” for hiring. “You simply have to recognise that the biases exist and put in the effort to do more than those default systems point you towards,” she says...........What Amazon’s experience suggests is that instead of sending bots to crawl over candidates’ past achievements, companies should be exploring ways in which computers can help them to assess and develop the long term potential of the people they invite to board the bus. Recruiters should ask, in Ming’s words, “Who will [these prospective candidates] be three years from now when they’re at their peak productivity inside the company? And that might be a very different story than who will deliver peak productivity the moment they walk in the door.”
heterogeneity  Amazon  artificial_intelligence  hiring  Jim_Collins  machine_learning  recruiting  teams  Vivienne_Ming  cautionary_tales  biases  diversity  intellectual_diversity  algorithms  questions  the_right_people 
january 2019 by jerryking
Overcoming adversity: In the footsteps of polar explorer Shackleton
December 22, 2018 | Financial Times | by Sarah Gordon.

In 2013 Tim Jarvis, an adventurer and environmental scientist, re-enacted Sir Ernest Shackleton’s 1916 epic journey, sailing a replica of his boat 1,500km across the Southern Ocean from Antarctica, where Shackleton’s men were stranded for more than a year, to South Georgia island, then climbing over its mountainous interior to the site of the whaling station where Shackleton finally found help.....Mr Jarvis’ team used the same rudimentary equipment, clothing, rations and technology as had been used a century earlier......Jarvis' Shackleton expedition, like the original, hit numerous hurdles:
(1) loss of a sponsor;
(2) a gruelling sea leg of their journey, navigating storms and treacherous currents to reach South Georgia;
(3) three of the six team members had trench foot and some frostbite and were unable to embark on the next phase, the mountain climb across the island.

Jarvis coped by “trying to take a leaf out of Shackleton’s book”, keeping people busy, staying completely focused himself and “not even entertaining” the thought of stopping. He and the other lead climber, former Marine Baz Gray, isolated themselves in order to stop others’ negativity clouding their judgment before tackling the mountains ahead. There were no rows, says Mr Jarvis, but there were tears......“If you feel that at some level the risk and the fear are worth it, you will overcome it.”.....Choosing the right team for a challenge as extreme as this required unorthodox methods. For Mr Jarvis, the best team is about people whose skills complement one another rather than just the best individuals. But he also needed to make sure that team members could really do what they said they could....You don't want “employees”. “When the chips are down, you want someone who feels that they’ve invested a lot in [the expedition] and it’s theirs . . . ”Jarvis believes the expedition taught him how to set a positive example, how to recognise which buttons to press to get people to apply themselves more, and how to deal with “multi-dimensional” challenges, not just physical, but reputational and financial. “On the sea I wasn’t the best sailor. On the land I wasn’t the best climber. All you’ve got is your leadership, your conviction that you can pull it off, your bloody-minded determination to continue.”
adversity  Antartica  Ernest_Shackleton  expeditions  explorers  leadership  multidimensional  negativity_bias  obstacles  pessimism  teams  re-enactments  selection_processes  South_Pole  torchbearers  unorthodox 
december 2018 by jerryking
Do less this year but do it better
January 7, 2018 | FT| Andrew Hill.

Accumulating multiple commitments poses other risks, too. If you try to do more than one thing, you will not be as efficient as if you concentrated on a single task. A 2001 paper found that people toggling between tasks took longer to solve complex maths problems than those who concentrated on one job.....Doing less “comes with this harsh requirement that . . . you have to obsess [about what you choose to do],”.........people who pursued a strategy of “do less, then obsess” ranked 25 percentage points higher than those who did not embrace the practice. ....Beware the danger of collaborating too little — or too much.....Sometimes achieving more requires more than individual effort. Managers can play a role in helping thier employees exercise self-discipline. Too often, organizations measure success by volume of work done — the law firm’s billable hours, say — or try to match the size of a team to the perceived importance of the project. Sometimes, though, the best approach may be to simplify a process, cut the size of a team, or impose a new strategic focus. How can you and your team achieve more this year? Try taking something away: impose constraints.
self-discipline  constraints  teams  productivity  commitments  South_Pole  Antartica  resolutions  busyness  Roald_Amundsen  obsessions 
january 2018 by jerryking
How to Build a Successful Team - Business Guides - The New York Times
By Adam Bryant

Make a Plan
You need a clear and measurable goal for what you want to accomplish.

HIRING WELL ISN'T ENOUGH - Hiring the right people is the most important part of building a strong team, of course, and delegating to give people more autonomy is a powerful motivator.

But managing a team is not that simple. Leaders have to play a far more hands-on role to make sure the group works well together and remains focused on the right priorities.

CREATE A CLEAR MAP - Leaders owe their teams an answer to .....“Where are we going and how are we going to get there?” In other words, what is the goal and how are we going to measure progress along the way? ..... What does success look like? If you were to set up a scoreboard to track success over time, what would it measure?

The trouble often starts when leaders start listing five or seven or 11 priorities. As Jim Collins, the author of the best-selling management books “Good to Great” and “Built to Last,” is fond of saying: “If you have more than three priorities, you don’t have any.”

HAVE A SHARED SCOREBOARD - Another benefit of having a simple plan is that it creates a shared goal that will offset the tendency of people to identify themselves as part of smaller groups. Think of a football team, for example. There are many “tribes” within a team – offense and defense, linemen and receivers, running backs and defensive backs. But because the goal of the team is clear, and there’s an external scoreboard to track progress, there is a greater sense of “us” on the team than the “us and them” dynamic that can often divide colleagues in companies.

“Metrics are actually the way that you can harmonize a large number of people, whether it’s dozens or even thousands,

YOU MAY FEEL LIKE A BROKEN RECORD--Once you have a simple plan... keep reminding your team of the priorities, even if it can feel repetitive. ....“You say something seven times and they haven’t heard you,” he said. “Until they start making jokes about how often you repeat it, they haven’t internalized it.”

Rules of the Road
You’ll need a set of values, behaviors and cultural guardrails so that everybody knows how to work together.

CREATE YOUR TEAM'S CULTURE

All families have values, even if they aren’t discussed explicitly. There are certain behaviors that are encouraged and discouraged — like rules of the road — for how everyone is going to (try to) get along and spend their time. ...As a leader, you can take a laissez-faire approach and hope the team meshes well over time. Or you can look for opportunities to set some shared guidelines for how people will work together.

There are no hard and fast rules for developing the cultural values of a team. In some cases, the founder of a company will issue them to employees. In others, top executives will turn the exercise over to employees to make it a bottom-up effort.

...AND STICK TO IT
teams  howto  lists  specificity  sticktoitiveness  shared_goals  cynicism  Jim_Collins  organizational_culture  values  repetition  priorities  metrics  subordinates  guardrails  the_right_people  cultural_values  tribes 
december 2017 by jerryking
Diversity means looking for the knife in a drawerful of spoons
SEPTEMBER 8, 2017 | Financial Times | Tim Harford.

Recruiters and admissions tutors are hoping they made the right choices.

So how do we select the best people for a course or a job? It seems like a sensible question, yet it contains a trap. In selecting the best person we might set a test — in a restaurant kitchen we might ask them to whip up some meals; in a software company we might set some coding problems. And then the trap is sprung.

By setting the same task for every applicant we recruit people who are carbon copies of each other. They will have the same skills and think in the same way. Allowing recruiters some subjective discretion might loosen this trap a little, but it might equally make it worse: we all tend to see merit in applicants who look, speak, and dress much like we do. Opposites do not attract, especially when it comes to corporate hiring.

This is unfair, of course. But it is also — for many but not all tasks — very unwise. Scott Page, a complexity scientist and author of The Diversity Bonus, invites us to think of people as possessing a kind of cognitive toolbox. The tools might be anything from fluent Mandarin to knowing how to dress a turkey to a command of Excel keyboard shortcuts. If the range of skills — the size of the toolkit — matters, then a diverse team will boast more cognitive skills than a homogenous team, even one full of top performers.
admissions  diversity  heterogeneity  hiring  homogeneity  recruiting  selection_processes  teams  Tim_Harford 
november 2017 by jerryking
The Pop-Up Employer: Build a Team, Do the Job, Say Goodbye -
JULY 12, 2017 | The New York Times | By NOAM SCHEIBER.

Two Stanford biz profs, Melissa Valentine and Michael Bernstein, have introduced the idea of “flash organizations” — ephemeral setups to execute a single, complex project in ways traditionally associated with corporations, nonprofit groups or governments.....information technology has made the flash organization a suddenly viable form across a number of industries.....intermediaries are already springing up across industries like software and pharmaceuticals to assemble such organizations. They rely heavily on data and algorithms to determine which workers are best suited to one another, and also on decidedly lower-tech innovations, like middle management......Temporary organizations capable of taking on complicated projects have existed for decades, e.g. Hollywood, where producers assemble teams of directors, writers, actors, costume and set designers and a variety of other craftsmen and technicians to execute projects with budgets in the tens if not hundreds of millions.....Jody Miller, a former media executive and venture capitalist, a co-founder of the Business Talent Group, sets up temporary teams of freelancers for corporations. “We’re the producers,” Ms. Miller said. “We understand how to evaluate talent, pick the team.”.....
Three lessons stand out across the flash-type models. First is that the platforms tend to be highly dependent on data and computing power....Second is the importance of well-established roles. ...Third, there is perhaps the least likely of innovations: middle management. The typical freelancer performs worker-bee tasks. Flash-like organizations tend to combine both workers and managers...........Flash organizations have obvious limits....they tend to work best for projects with well-defined life spans, not continuing engagements....“The bottleneck now is project managers,” ... “It’s a really tough position to fill.”.....even while fostering flexibility, the model could easily compound insecurity. Temporary firms are not likely to provide health or retirement benefits. ..... the anxiety is legitimate, but these platforms could eventually dampen insecurity by playing a role that companies have historically played: providing benefits, topping off earnings if workers’ freelance income is too low or too spotty, even allowing workers to organize.
pop-ups  freelancing  on-demand  ephemerality  producers  execution  Hollywood  project_management  teams  data  algo  lessons_learned  Business_Talent_Group  Gigster  Artella  Foundry  Slack  pharmaceutical_industry  Outsourcing  contractors  job_insecurity  middle_management  gig_economy  ad_hoc  dissolutions  short-term  short-lived 
july 2017 by jerryking
MBA Mondays: Turning Your Team
August 12, 2013 | – AVC | Fred Wilson.

A serial entrepreneur I know tells me "you will turn your team three times on the way from startup to a business of scale." What he means is that the initial team will depart, replaced by another team, which in turn will be replaced by yet another team....Companies scale and the team needs to scale with it. That often means turning the team.

The "turning your team" thing probably makes sense to most people. But executing it is where things get tricky and hard. How are you going to push out the person who built the first product almost all by themselves? How are you going to push out the person who brought in the first customer? How are you going to tell the person who managed your first user community so deftly that their services are no longer needed by your company?

And when do you need to do this and in what order? It's not like you tell your entire senior team to leave on the same day. So the execution of all of this is hard and getting the timing right is harder.
advice  business  scaling  teams  start_ups  Fred_Wilson  turning_your_team  turnarounds  execution  judgment  serial_entrepreneur  think_threes 
october 2016 by jerryking
The Similarities Between Building and Scaling a Product and a Company – AVC
August 15, 2013 | AVC | by Fred Wilson.

Once you have a successful product in the market, you need to turn your attention to scaling it. The system you and your team built will break if you don't keep tweaking it as demand grows. Greg Pass, who was VP Engineering at Twitter during the period where Twitter really scaled, talks about instrumenting your service so you can see when its reaching a breaking point, and then fixing the bottleneck before the system breaks. He taught me that you can't build something that will never break. You have to constantly be rebuilding parts of the system and you need to have the data and processes to know which parts to focus on at what time.

The team is the same way. Your awesome COO who helped you get from 30 people to 150 people without missing a beat might become a bottleneck at 200 people. ....
How you fix your system and how you fix your team depends on the facts and circumstances of the problem. There is no one right answer. The key is removing the bottleneck so the rest of the system can work again. ...It is harder to instrument your team the way you can instrument a software system. 360 reviews and other feedback systems are a good way to get some data. And walking around the company, doing lunches with managers who are one level down from your senior team, and generally being open to and available for feedback is the way you get the data. When you see that someone on your team has maxed out and the entire system is crashing as a result, you need to act.
Fred_Wilson  scaling  teams  professional_service_firms  bottlenecks  COO  instrumentation_monitoring  soft_skills  turning_your_team 
october 2016 by jerryking
Inside the mind of a venture capitalist | McKinsey & Company
August 2016 | McK | Steve Jurvetson is a partner at Draper Fisher Jurvetson. Michael Chui,
(1) entrepreneurs who have infectious enthusiasm.
(2) sector of the economy believed to be experiencing rapid growth/ massive disruptive change.
(3) wide range of industries, from synthetic biology to rockets to electric cars to a variety of sectors that weren’t ripe for venture investment in prior decades but now are becoming software businesses.
(4) attributes and people somewhat similar to what I look for in the team at work: enough self-confidence to be humble about what it’s proposing and respect for the team over individuals
How should large companies respond? The large companies that are most exciting to me are the ones that innovate outside their core. big companies need to innovate outside their core businesses. The biggest start-up: Space.
Steve_Jurvetson  McKinsey  DFJ  venture_capital  teams  vc  disruption  space  large_companies  software  core_businesses  Moore's_Law  machine_learning  passions  Elon_Musk  accelerated_lifecycles  space_travel  innovation  self-confidence  humility 
august 2016 by jerryking
Beth Comstock of General Electric: Granting Permission to Innovate - The New York Times
By ADAM BRYANT JUNE 17, 2016

Early on, I wasn’t confident, and I’m sure that showed. I probably asked a lot of questions that started with, “Would you …? Could you …? Might you think about …?”

There was probably a tentativeness about me. But I also remember being very impatient about wanting things to go faster in my career, and wanting people to move faster.

I’ve also had to learn to ask for help, rather than waiting until everything is perfectly done. Sometimes you feel like you can’t put an idea out there until you’ve looked at it from every angle, as opposed to saying, “Here’s a seed of an idea, help me make it better.” In those early days, I was afraid to put something out there if it wasn’t totally baked and perfect.

Being part of collaborative teams, I’ve come to appreciate the power of them a lot more than I did early on. When you get the teamwork right, it’s like magic because everybody has a role. You’re different, but you come together and you have a mission.

Those are the things I really love about work. When it hasn’t worked, it’s because the team hasn’t been right. The dynamics aren’t right.
CEOs  GE  innovation  women  Beth_Comstock  leadership  teams  asking_for_help  personal_chemistry 
june 2016 by jerryking
5 Spectacular Marketing Insights From Cirque du Soleil On Customer Intimacy | momentology
By Lisa Lacy, 21st of April 2016 at 14:05 PM.

So how does Cirque du Soleil use get closer to its fans? Here are five marketing insights from Derricks.

1. Be Ready To Ask & Re-Ask Questions

the live entertainment brand isn’t the new kid on the block anymore....undergoing a huge transformation as a result in part of private investment firm TPG acquiring a majority stake last year.

“And what’s fascinating is this inflection point is a chance to re-ask all the questions,” Derricks said. “Everything is back on the table again. Our brand is incredibly strong on stage, but where we’re challenged is what happens beyond the lights and how to interact with you.”

2. Don’t Miss The Marketing Basics
it’s hard for a brand like Cirque du Soleil to simply deliver an app or the like, so “given the crowded market, there’s a lot of basic blocking and tackling as much as finding the next brand new thing. Sometimes it’s about being in the right place at the right time.”

That means Cirque du Soleil capitalizes on traditional out-of-home tactics like taxi toppers and marquis ads, as well as videos in taxis to create awareness and buzz.

3. Have Smaller Conversations & Tell Stories

Derricks said the brand is hearing from its fans that they want to know more about the performers and what goes on behind the scenes.

“Where we’re challenged is selling the concept of the show itself,” Derricks said. “The most radical thing we can do is to be more intimate. I don’t know if we can be louder, but we can be more intimate and [and bring you] behind the curtain, which is a fascinating new adventure for Cirque du Soleil.

4. Bring People To You

Another part of Cirque du Soleil’s marketing strategy involves breaking down the shows into their component parts and connecting with audiences from there....As a result, the brand has begun experimenting with master classes in fields like makeup and dance.

5. Conduct Team Building Activities

What’s more, noting the circus itself has changed drastically as traditional circuses included acts in which performers were related by blood and were therefore very tightly knit, Derricks said Cirque du Soleil, which includes groups of performers without family ties, had to conjure up its own unique methods of fostering trust....As a result, Cirque du Soleil created Spark Sessions, or corporate experiences for networking, business development and/or milestones, to get other companies involved and to help teach what it has since learned about trust and leadership, "
private_equity  TPG  Guy_Laliberté  entrepreneur  fascination  Cirque_du_Soleil  customer_experience  storytelling  customer_intimacy  LBMA  out-of-home  teams  trustworthiness  brands  insights  outreach  live_performances  corporate_training  inflection_points 
april 2016 by jerryking
Gen. Stanley McChrystal’s Lessons Learned - WSJ
By ALEXANDRA WOLFE
May 8, 2015

Next week, Gen. McChrystal will release a new book, “Team of Teams,” in which he describes how he and his staff remade the Joint Special Operations Task Force in the Middle East to fight a new kind of decentralized, tech-savvy enemy. (The book is co-written by Tantum Collins, David Silverman and Chris Fussell.) The general remade the Task Force in part by using technology such as daily videoconferences to create something he calls “shared consciousness.” The goal was to empower subordinate units to make decisions far more quickly and with greater precision than a traditional hierarchy could. It wasn’t easy. “In some ways, the military has sort of invented bureaucracy,”
Stanley_McChrystal  JSOC  lessons_learned  books  teams  operational_tempo  shared_consciousness 
may 2015 by jerryking
What Hollywood Can Teach Us About the Future of Work - NYTimes.com
MAY 5, 2015 | NYT |By ADAM DAVIDSON.

the “Hollywood model.” A project is identified; a team is assembled; it works together for precisely as long as is needed to complete the task; then the team disbands. This short-­term, project-­based business structure is an alternative to the corporate model, in which capital is spent up front to build a business, which then hires workers for long-­term, open-­ended jobs that can last for years, even a lifetime. It’s also distinct from the Uber-­style “gig economy,” which is designed to take care of extremely short-­term tasks, manageable by one person, typically in less than a day....With the Hollywood model, ad hoc teams carry out projects that are large and complex, requiring many different people with complementary skills. The Hollywood model is now used to build bridges, design apps or start restaurants. Many cosmetics companies assemble a temporary team of aestheticians and technical experts to develop new products, then hand off the actual production to a factory, which does have long-­term employees...Our economy is in the midst of a grand shift toward the Hollywood model. More of us will see our working lives structured around short-­term, project-­based teams rather than long-­term, open­-ended jobs...the Hollywood model is a surprisingly good system for many workers too, in particular those with highly-sought-­after skills. Ask Hollywood producers, and they’ll confirm that there are only a limited number of proven, reliable craftspeople for any given task. Projects tend to come together quickly, with strict deadlines, so those important workers are in a relatively strong negotiating position. Wages among, say, makeup and hair professionals on shoots are much higher than among their counterparts at high-­end salons. Similarly, set builders make more than carpenters and electricians working on more traditional construction sites....It’s probably not coincidental that the Hollywood model is ascendant at a time when telling stories, broadly speaking, is at the heart of American business.The Hollywood system offers another advantage for workers: Every weekend’s box-­office results provide new information about which skills in their field are valuable. ....The Hollywood model isn’t good news for everybody. It clearly rewards education and cultural fluency, which are not distributed evenly throughout the population.
trends  Hollywood  storytelling  teams  project_management  market_intelligence  automation  Communicating_&_Connecting  Managing_Your_Career  gig_economy  ad_hoc  dissolutions  short-term  on-demand  short-lived 
may 2015 by jerryking
New York Prosecutors Hired at Boies Schiller - WSJ
Jan. 12, 2015 | WSJ | By ASHBY JONES.

Can this approach to team hiring be transferred to hiring in IT? What situations make sense for this approach? For Robert Berger...

A firm landing three federal prosecutors from the same office at the same time is highly unusual. But it was, in the words of Mr. Schwartz, “very much a package deal.” Said Mr. Zach: “All three of us wanted to work with people we trust and people we had worked with in the past.”
law_firms  Wall_Street  hiring  teams  David_Boies  carve_outs  package_deals 
january 2015 by jerryking
From War Room to Boardroom: Leadership Lessons From Two Generals - WSJ
Dec. 8, 2014 | WSJ |

Start to build relationships so that you have something to fall back on when you disagree on the issues.

What leadership lessons should we take from the American experience in Iraq and Afghanistan?

GEN. MCCHRYSTAL: The first thing is we didn’t do due diligence before we went in. We didn’t understand the problem to the depth that we needed to. We didn’t take the time to do it, and we didn’t nurture the experts.

If we gathered all the Pashtun and Arabic speakers in the U.S. military, we could probably fit them on this stage. And yet, after World War II began, after Pearl Harbor, we trained more than 5,000 military members to speak Japanese. We just haven’t made that level of effort.

The other thing is we go at this with different parts of our government. Every agency wants to help but they want to protect their equities, and you can’t do a complex endeavor like this unless you can build a truly integrated team in which everybody is focused.
leadership  lessons_learned  shared_consciousness  operational_tempo  Stanley_McChrystal  teams  NSC  security_&_intelligence  generalship  ISIS  al_Qaeda  Taliban  learning_organizations  adaptability  decision_making  speed  languages  Arabic  Pashtun  relationships 
december 2014 by jerryking
The six people every startup needs - The Globe and Mail
GABRIELLE KAROL
Entrepreneur.com
Published Tuesday, May. 06 2014
start_ups  teams 
may 2014 by jerryking
Why can’t today’s graduates get hired? -
Dec. 05 2013 | The Globe and Mail | by Margaret Wente.

“Everywhere, employers are looking to recruit young people with a strong complement of soft skills, such as the ability to communicate, think critically and work in teams,” John Manley, president of the Canadian Council of Chief Executives, said in a recent speech.

The real skills gap, business leaders say, is not the shortage of oil-field engineers and the glut of history BAs. It’s about the shortage of young people who are good at problem-solving, communication, teamwork, time management, persistence, loyalty and dedication. Survey after survey reports that businesses can’t find enough workers who are motivated, flexible and organized. As a recent piece in Time magazine declared, “The entry-level candidates who are on tap to join the ranks of full-time work are clueless about the fundamentals of office life. ”...“As recently as 10 years ago, organizations would hire for potential,” Ms. Moses told me. “But now they want people who can hit the ground running.” Employers have also become extremely risk-averse about new hires – another factor that stacks the deck against the twentysomethings. It’s hard to prove that you can do the job if nobody will give you the first one. As for the soft-skills gap, she thinks it’s overblown. For starters, today’s young adults have collaborated and worked in teams all their lives.

The trouble is that few companies do training any more, even the kind of informal short-term training that can break in someone new.
Barbara_Moses  Communicating_&_Connecting  critical_thinking  grit  hiring  job_search  John_Manley  loyalty  millennials  Margaret_Wente  new_graduates  persistence  problem_solving  skills  short-sightedness  skills_gap  teams  time-management  young_people 
december 2013 by jerryking
A Recipe to Enhance Innovation - NYTimes.com
By CHRYSTIA FREELAND
Published: November 15, 2012

it is worth thinking hard about how to make diverse teams effective, and how people who straddle two cultural worlds can succeed....In “Connecting the Dots Within: Creative Performance and Identity Integration,” Chi-Ying Cheng, of Singapore Management University, Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks, of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, and Fiona Lee, also at the University of Michigan, argue that ethnic minorities, and women in male-dominated professions, are most creative when they have found a way to believe that their “multiple and conflicting social identities are compatible.”... Their conclusion was that people who have found a way to reconcile their two identities — Asian-Americans, for example, or women who work in male-dominated jobs like engineering — are the best at finding creative solutions to problems..... In other words, if the world around us tells us our dual identities are compatible, we will believe that, and act accordingly. If female engineers work in a company that treats their gender as a virtue, they will do better. If Asian-Americans live in a community that celebrates both aspects of their identity, they will be more effective.

America’s rainbow coalition won at the ballot box this month, but in other settings, the nation has become a little weary of diversity-cheering movements like multiculturalism and even explicit feminism. Dr. Cheng’s work suggests that cynicism may be misplaced. Diversity can work, but we have to work at it.
Chrystia_Freeland  demographic_changes  ethnic_communities  diversity  cross-cultural  books  teams  innovation  connecting_the_dots  dual-consciousness  heterogeneity 
december 2012 by jerryking
The Team Advantage (Part 1)
Feb 1992 | American Printer pg. 34 | Michael PO'Connor & Becky
ProQuest  teams 
july 2012 by jerryking
In search of up-and-comers: some principles to follow
02 Dec 1995 | The Globe and Mail pg. B.18.| Gary Lamphier.

IMAGINE investing in technology stars such as California's 3Com or Ottawa's Istar Internet - last week's market darling on the Toronto Stock Exchange - long before they've gone public and other investors have jumped aboard.

That's the game venture capitalists play as they scour obscure industry publications and trade shows, attend endless conferences and swap gossip with entrepreneurs in search of tomorrow's success stories.
(1) Most want to see company principals put their money where their mouth is by investing in their own companies. Otherwise, no deal.
(2) The market that the startup company plans to sell its product into must be big and getting bigger.
(3) Any start-up company that hopes to prosper must have exceptionally strong management, the pros agree.
(4) Successful companies breed successful companies.
Sequoia  Michael_Moritz  venture_capital  vc  Kleiner_Perkins  start_ups  rules_of_the_game  large_markets  teams  skin_in_the_game  unglamorous 
july 2012 by jerryking
Don Valentine, Venture Capitalist - Forbes
12/09/2005 @ 10:59AM |149 views
Don Valentine, Venture Capitalist
Rich Karlgaard Rich Karlgaard,

Most VCs say they invest, first and foremost, in people. Technology and markets are secondary considerations. The thinking goes: “A” people will know how to find “A” technology and “A” markets.

Valentine rejects that. He bets on markets that are ready to explode. Deep in his salesman’s bones, Valentine knew the market for microcomputers (Apple), databases (Oracle) and routers (Cisco) would go nuclear before other investors did.
Don_Valentine  Rich_Karlgaard  Sequoia  large_markets  teams  high-growth 
june 2012 by jerryking
Starting Up in High Gear
July-August 2000 | HBR |An Interview with Vinod Khosla by David Champion and Nicholas G. Carr.

To create the kind of new wealth you’re talking about, we’re going to have to see massive investments in information technology. Where’s the money going to come from?

It’s going to come out of corporate budgets. Companies invest wherever they’re going to get the biggest returns, and right now that’s IT. Look at the trend in capital expenditures. Twenty years ago, information technology accounted for about 10% of capital expenditures in the United States. ...
Today, if you have a plan for a new business, you circulate it in the venture community and you get funded in a week. What you don’t get is an honest, painstaking critique. What are the downsides in your plan? What are the shortcomings? What are the weak links? The strengths of your idea get a lot of attention, but the weaknesses get ignored—and ultimately it’s the weaknesses of your plan that will kill you. A start-up is only as strong as its weakest link....
The first thing we focused on was getting the right set of people for the company—the right gene pool. We started out on the technical end. Pradeep had helped architect the Ultrasparc processor at Sun, so he had strong skills in building technical architectures and could apply those skills to routers. But he needed somebody with experience in building and operating an IP network, and he needed somebody who’d done operating systems software for routers and somebody who’d done protocols for routers. So we drew out a map that said, “Here are the ten different areas of expertise we need.” Then we made a list of the companies doing the best work in each area, and we listed the five people in each company who would make good targets. We went after those people, and piece by piece we assembled a multidisciplinary team that could make Juniper a leader.
IT  interviews  HBR  Kleiner_Perkins  start_ups  large_companies  management_consulting  Vinod_Khosla  executive_search  shortcomings  weaknesses  new_businesses  CAPEX  weak_links  Nicholas_Carr  talent_acquisition  gene_pool  expertise  team_risk  wealth_creation  cross-pollination  interdisciplinary  teams  protocols 
june 2012 by jerryking
To Bolivia and beyond: how to collaborate abroad - The Globe and Mail
nick rockel
Special to Globe and Mail Update
Published Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012
virtual_teams  teams  collaboration  home_based  howto 
february 2012 by jerryking
Nancy Folbre: Saluting Teamwork - NYTimes.com
February 6, 2012, 6:00 am
Saluting Teamwork
By NANCY FOLBRE
U.S._military  teams 
february 2012 by jerryking
How to Build Your Financial Dream Team - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 31, 2011

How to Build Your Financial Dream Team

By KAREN BLUMENTHAL
financial_advisors  howto  teams  financial_planning 
january 2012 by jerryking
"The bruises of the bandwagon: ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Reality television is revealing how desperately some people want to break into business. But many fail to analyse their ideas,
Apr. 25, 2005 | Financial Times pg 16.| by Paul Tyrrell

Everyone wants to run their own business. But many fail to prepare thoroughly before scrambling on to the bandwagon. Among the television hopefuls, the most widespread and humiliating trait is a failure to appreciate that an entrepreneur's personal qualities are just as important as their ideas.

It is a salutary warning. Venture capitalists and business angels have always been more inclined to back a great team with a mediocre idea than a mediocre team with a great idea. They attach a lot of importance to what they term "scar tissue" - evidence that the person has learned from experience.

"People who are enamoured of their own idea can be great, but only if they listen really hard,"... "Nothing goes to plan, so you're looking for people you can trust off-plan." ...Entrepreneurs are more likely to succeed if they can come up with an idea that exploits their experience. This is particularly clear in product development situations - for example, where an engineer takes the knowledge he gains at a large company and uses it to set up a rival.

Research suggests that "spin-outs have a survival edge in the market over other entrants as the result of a combination of entrepreneurial flexibility and inherited knowledge"....what distinguishes successful entrepreneurs is their ability to spot commercially exploitable patterns where others cannot. Herbert Simon, winner of the 1978 Nobel Prize in economic sciences, suggests this process is intuitive: a good business idea stems from the creative linking, or cross-association of two or more in-depth "chunks" of experience - know-how and contacts.
Infotrac_Newsstand  entrepreneurship  entrepreneur  pattern_recognition  personality_types/traits  television  spin-offs  entertainment  venture_capital  angels  cross-pollination  tacit_data  knowledge_intensive  scar_tissue  teams  team_risk  off-plan  Plan_B  tacit_knowledge  nimbleness  combinations 
november 2011 by jerryking
How GE Teaches Teams to Lead Change
January 009 | HBR | by Steven Prokesch.

Idea in Brief

Management development programs that focus on teaching and inspiring individuals to apply new approaches have a fundamental flaw: If other members of an individual’s team have not taken the course, they may resist efforts to change.

The antidote to this problem is training intact management teams.

When managers go through a program together, they emerge with a consensus view of the opportunities and problems and how best to attack them. The result: faster and more effective change.
HBR  GE  teaching  teams  change  change_management  shared_consciousness  shared_experiences  Jeffrey_Immelt  training  leadership_development  innovation  growth 
november 2011 by jerryking
How to Make Your Co-Workers Smarter
May 11, 2011| BNET | By Jessica Stillman.
Learn about people’s passions. You can’t connect with others if you
don’t know anything about them. So, who are they? Ask lots of questions.
What inspires or drives them? What are their goals? What have they
learned recently?
Get over yourself. Flip your focus from yourself to the other
person. When you say to yourself, “He hates me” or “She thinks I’m
stupid,” you are making someone else’s behavior about you [jk: emotional mastery]. Change your
perspective. For instance, if you are thinking, “I want her to think I’m
smart” flip your focus to “I want her to be smart.”
Make connections. When interacting with small groups, be a
“connector” by calling out each person’s unique talents or strengths.
Help people connect the dots and see that two or more heads really are
better than one.
Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  co-workers  curiosity  emotional_mastery  empowerment  howto  ice-breakers  passions  questions  serving_others  smart_people  teams  workplaces 
may 2011 by jerryking
Corner Office - The 5 Habits of Highly Effective C.E.O.’s
April 16, 2011|NYT|ADAM BRYANT
* Passionate Curiosity.
Share stories re. failures, doubts & mistakes. Ask big-picture
questions re. why things work the way they do & can they be improved
upon? Know people’s back stories, and what they do. Relentless
questioning can lead to spotting new opportunities, or helping
understand subordinates, and how to get them to work together
effectively.
* Battle-Hardened Confidence
The best predictor of behavior is past performance, & that’s why so
many CEOs interview job candidates about how they've dealt with failure.

* Team Smarts
* A Simple Mind-Set
Be concise, get to the point, make it simple. ...There was a time when
simply having certain information was a competitive advantage. Now, in
the Internet era, most people have easy access to the same information.
That puts a greater premium on the ability to synthesize, to connect
dots in new ways and to ask simple, smart questions that lead to
untapped opportunities.
* Fearlessness - Not status quo!
CEOs  leadership  teams  ksfs  contextual_intelligence  Managing_Your_Career  executive_management  curiosity  questions  mindsets  concision  confidence  critical_thinking  overlooked_opportunities  interpretation  connecting_the_dots  fearlessness  the_big_picture  subordinates 
april 2011 by jerryking
Document Page: Social Science Palooza II
Brooks, David
The New York Times
03-18-2011

brooks.blogs.nytimes.com
David_Brooks  teams  motivations  employee_engagement  sports 
march 2011 by jerryking
The Perils of Blame in the Workplace - NYTimes.com
By EILENE ZIMMERMAN
March 12, 2011

The last thing you want is a reputation for throwing co-workers under
the bus. It’s far more politically savvy and productive to approach the
mistake as a team problem. “Recommend a post-mortem analysis of what
happened, where you look at the chain of events, what occurred and what
didn’t, and questions get answered in a good-faith process,” says Ben
Dattner, a management consultant and author of “The Blame Game: How the
Hidden Rules of Credit and Blame Determine Our Success or Failure.”
co-workers  morale_management  workplaces  post-mortems  Communicating_&_Connecting  teams  gratitude  blaming_fingerpointing  accountability 
march 2011 by jerryking
Science Teamwork Needed - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 5, 2011 | WSJ | Jonah Lehrer. Sunset of the Solo Scientist
teams  science_&_technology  solo  breakthroughs  genius  collaboration 
february 2011 by jerryking
Monday morning manager
Apr 3, 2006 | G&M.pg. B.2 | Harvey Schachter. Most
presentations & product demos start with a corporate overview of the
company doing the selling. Instead, save the corporate overview for the
end and start with a powerful slide that captures the needs of the
buyer. ... Financing: How to raise capital from angel investors.
Raising money from angels requires a shrewd understanding of their
wallets, inner needs, and spouse, according to venture capitalist Guy
Kawasaki.On his blog, he advises you to:Make sure they are rich enough
to never get a penny back, and also sophisticated investors, who can
give you advice.Understand their motivations, whether it's purely
monetary or includes paying back society by helping other entrepreneurs.
Enable them to live vicariously through your efforts, reliving the
thrills of entrepreneurship while avoiding the firing line. Seek their
advice, routinely.Make your story comprehensible to their spouse, who
will have a say if not a veto in the investment.
Beatles  teams  presentations  Communicating_&_Connecting  storytelling  howto  angels  funding  Harvey_Schachter  guy_kawasaki  ProQuest 
december 2010 by jerryking
How to Find a Technical Co-Founder |
November 8, 2010 | Jet Cooper | by Andrew Peek
hiring  advice  tips  teams  howto  CTO  start_ups 
december 2010 by jerryking
Managing the Future Workplace? Start Here. - WSJ.com
SEPT. 19, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By ALAN MURRAY. How
should managers behave in this new economic order? Key trends include:
trust in business being at an all time low; continued govt. involvement
in the economy; credit remaining hard to come by; U.S. consumers
sitting on their wallets; Asia will likely continue to rise, and
technological change will likely continue to accelerate. Stay flexible.
Devour data. Be (somewhat) humble. Communicate. Plan for contingencies.
Be proactive. Insist on candor. Stay involved. Keep your organization
flat. Cross-train your talent.Assess your team.Use your judgment.
managing_uncertainty  workplaces  Alan_Murray  technological_change  future  organizational_culture  flexibility  resilience  contingency_planning  cross-training  data  data_driven  proactivity  humility  candour  Asia  credit  consumer_spending  judgment  teams  accelerated_lifecycles  trends  trustworthiness 
september 2010 by jerryking
The office of 2020: We need it yesterday
Apr. 09, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Michael Bloom.

The Conference Board of Canada has just finished a two-year study - Navigating Through the Storm: Leaders and the World of Work in 2020 - and found 10 major changes that leaders need to understand now.

1. Boomers won't leave. Generations will mix...."Generational mixing" will be the norm as aging baby boomers stay on the payroll, either because they will need to earn more before retiring, or because changes in government regulations will make retirement less attractive.....boomers, Gen Xers (born 1966 to 1979) and Gen Yers (born 1980 to 2000) will share space, ideas, incomes and job titles.
2. The visible minority will be white.....The challenge? How to integrate visible minorities into every part of working life - especially at the top.
3. We will all be linked to work 24/7, whether we want to be or not.
4. We will make more of what we consume, where we consume it.
5. The office will be where we say it is.
6. Social media will be the community halls of the future.
7. Real companies will have virtual locations.
8. Management will be pushed down and out.
9. Contingent workers will become unconditionally important....More part-time, seasonal and contract workers will help companies adjust in advance to quick changes in the type and amount of work that needs to be done. But they will be less loyal and make it harder to enforce a single corporate culture..
10. Teamwork will be a learned skill, not just a nice attitude.
workplaces  baby_boomers  prosumerism  mobile  social_media  decentralization  trends  teams  contingent_workers  on-demand 
april 2010 by jerryking
To Slim Down, Businesses Team Up - WSJ.com
AUGUST 28, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by DIANA RANSOM.
Teaming up is not a foreign concept to start-up business owners, who
often have less capital and fewer resources than larger, more
established firms. However, as the economy continues to soften, many
small businesses — even those that have been around for decades — are
not only trading services, but also combining forces.
collaboration  small_business  strategic_alliances  joint_ventures  teams  owners 
august 2009 by jerryking
Corner Office - John Chambers of Cisco - Treasure Your Setbacks - Question - NYTimes.com
Aug. 1, 2009 | New York Times | Interview w. John Chambers,
chairman and CEO, Cisco Systems, conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.
(1) We’re products of the challenges faced in life; (2) Becoming a
great company involves encountering major setbacks--near-death
experiences--and overcoming them; (3) During stressful events, it’s
valuable to be your calmest, most analytical self; (4) Today’s world
requires a different leadership style — more collaboration and teamwork
including using Web 2.0 tech; (5) Build relationships with people who
have dramatically different views from yours by identifying and focusing
on areas shared in common; (6) Moving too slow or moving too fast
without process behind it are both dangerous; (7) Interview questions -
tell me about your results;your mistakes and failures-what would you do
differently this time? who are the best people you recruited and
developed-where are they today? Customer-oriented? Good listeners?
Domain expertise? Sports played?
Cisco  CEOs  leadership  lessons_learned  interviews  hiring  interview_preparation  John_Chambers  setbacks  teams  stressful  resilience  bouncing_back  collaboration  dual-consciousness  dangers  internal_systems  relationships  calm  industry_expertise  dissension  process-orientation 
august 2009 by jerryking
Corner Office - Connecting the Dots Isn’t Enough, Adobe’s Chief Says - Question - NYTimes.com
July 18, 2009 | New York Times | Interview with Shantanu
Narayen, president and chief executive of Adobe Systems, was conducted
and condensed by Adam Bryant.
CEOs  leadership  Adobe  Apple  goal-setting  teams  hiring  time-management  failure  connecting_the_dots 
july 2009 by jerryking
Hallmarks of an entrepreneur striving for gold
02-Aug-2005 | Financial Times pg. 8 | by John Mullins.

Entrepreneurs can succeed in difficult industries, but they must – among other things – be able to:

· Identify the critical success factors specific to their particular industry;

· Assemble a team that can deliver on these factors.

(1) Which decisions or activities are the ones that, if carried out wrong, will have crippling effects on company performance?
(2) Which decisions or activities, done right, will have a disproportionately positive effect on performance?
(3) In terms of skilful team-building, what skills do you have? Need?
disproportionality  entrepreneur  industry_expertise  ksfs  linchpins  jck  life_skills  online_travel  questions  rate-limiting_steps  site_selection  skills  skiing  Starbucks  start_ups  teams  think_threes  tourism 
march 2009 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - The Coming Swarm - NYTimes.com
February 14, 2009 NYT op-ed by JOHN ARQUILLA: The U.S. needs to
prepare itself for small team, simultaneous, multiple target terrorist
attacks.
op_ed  terrorism  security_&_intelligence  teams  multiple_targets  militaries 
february 2009 by jerryking
Managing: Six ways to be a team player
April 16, 2007 G&M column by Harvey Schachter in which John Szold outlines 6 tips to becoming a team MVP.

Be approachable: When someone asks for help, no matter how trivial the task may seem to you, it's important to him or her. Treat them with respect. Avoid sighing, eye rolling or other negative reactions.

Be responsive: Often, we're so focused on the tasks we need to accomplish that we put off a colleague's request for help. You shouldn't be expected to drop what you're doing, but you should offer a date or time when you can accommodate the request.

Improve your communication skills: Make sure people understand you -- and if you're not sure, ask: "I'm not sure if I said that clearly. What's your understanding?" When listening, make a conscious effort to really "hear" what's being said, rather than simply formulating your response.

Establish and maintain trust: Avoid gossiping. Nothing upsets an office dynamic like anger and distrust.

Share what you know: If you hold back because you want sole credit for an idea, you are doing yourself and the group a disservice.

Put the team first: If you find yourself thinking, "What's in it for me?" reposition your thinking by asking, "What's in it for the team?" No one person is more important than anyone else.
Managing_Your_Career  tips  teams  Harvey_Schachter  clarity  filetype:pdf  media:document  responsiveness  Communicating_&_Connecting  trustworthiness  gossip  generosity  serving_others  approachability  listening 
january 2009 by jerryking

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