recentpopularlog in

jerryking : tech-utopianism   6

Retailing Through The Trough Of Disillusionment -
January 22, 2016Posted in Blog, Marketing, Mobile Marketing, Strategy, Technology, The Future

By Doug Stephens
Doug_Stephens  retailers  strategy  location_based_services  LBMA  tech-utopianism  disillusioned  Gartner 
january 2016 by jerryking
Empire of the geeks | The Economist
Jul 25th 2015 |

The 1990s saw a financial bubble that ended in a spectacular bust. This time the danger is insularity. The geeks live in a bubble that seals off their empire from the world they are doing so much to change....Critics are often from industries wanting to protect their privileges; the geeks’ aggressive behaviour is sometimes part of the creative destruction that leads to progress. But that is not the only source of anger. Silicon Valley also dominates markets, sucks out the value contained in personal data, and erects business models that make money partly by avoiding taxes. There is a risk that global consumers will feel exploited and that the effects of a shrinking tax base will infuriate voters.
techno-evangelism  Silicon_Valley  insularity  dangers  on-demand  network_effects  start_ups  tech-utopianism  creative_destruction 
july 2015 by jerryking
Beware the Tech Bubble—But Stay Calm - WSJ.com
By Farhad Manjoo

Dec. 29, 2013

two-step guide for reaping the best from tech while staving off the next bout of irrational exuberance. Think of it as my year-end gift to you, a clip-and-save guide for preventing a new tech bubble.

Step 1: Worry. If you're an investor, employee, founder, tech journalist or in some other way connected to the tech business, worrying about the bubble is your best defense against the bubble. Worrying keeps you sharp. Worrying keeps magical thinking at bay. As in the 1990s, the tech industry is pushing grand, society-transforming novelties on the rest of the world. If you're not worried that some of these claims are crazy, you're not paying attention.

Step 2: Don't panic. Don't let your anxiety become all-consuming. If you study the last dot-com boom, you'll see profound differences between what happened then and what's happening now. Unlike in the 1990s, today's public markets have yet to fully buy in to the boom; it's difficult to take a tech company public, and a newly public company can expect to be judged harshly by the press and investors if it shows any sign of weakness. This factor—the stock market's demand for results—is an enormous difference from the last boom. And it is reason enough to hold off on any panic.

Now, I know that my plan—worry, but don't panic—sounds like a glib, easy way to deal with tech's rise. As a columnist, I strive for firmer, less squishy opinions. I want to say, "Hey, keep partying, there's no bubble!" or "Everyone hide, doom awaits, the end is nigh!"

But unfortunately, the truth is more nuanced and complicated. People with an interest in tech should be on guard against the bubble at the same time they are open to the transformative powers of tech.
Silicon_Valley  technology  bubbles  IPOs  skepticism  paranoia  happy_talk  Farhad_Manjoo  keep_calm  wishful_thinking  worrying  panics  tech-utopianism  pay_attention 
december 2013 by jerryking
In tech we trust
September 7/8, 2013 | Financial Times | By Simon Kuper.

Hope spring eternal. Instead of developing a policy to solve a problem, people now develop an app.
mobile_applications  problem_solving  tech-utopianism  techno-evangelism 
september 2013 by jerryking
The next big tech revolution? The global brain - The Globe and Mail
Sep. 22, 2011 | Globe and Mail | CHRYSTIA FREELAND.

Mr. Milner, in contrast, almost perfectly represents a technology elite with a global reference: He lives in Moscow, recently bought a home in Silicon Valley, and addressed the Ukrainian conference by video link from Singapore. From that vantage point, the most pressing issue in the world today isn’t recession and political paralysis in the West, or even the rapid development and political transformation in emerging markets, it is the technology revolution that, in his view, is only getting started.

Here are some of the changes he sees as most significant:

The Internet revolution is the fastest economic change humans have experienced, and it is accelerating. Two billion people are online today, he noted; he predicts that number will double over the next decade.

The Internet is not just about connecting people, it is also about connecting machines, a phenomenon he dubbed “the Internet of things.” Five billion devices are connected today, he said; by 2020, he thinks more than 20 billion will be.

More information is being created than ever before. He asserted that as much information was created every 48 hours in 2010 as was created between the dawn of time and 2003. In 10 years, that much data will be generated every 60 minutes.

The result is the dominance of Internet platforms relative to traditional media, he said: “The largest newspaper in the United States is only reaching 1 per cent of the population ... That compares to Internet media, which is used by 25 per cent of the population daily and growing.”

Internet businesses are much more efficient than brick-and-mortar companies. This was one of his most striking observations, and a clue to the paradox of how we find ourselves simultaneously living in a time of what he views as unprecedented technological innovation but also high unemployment in the developed West. As Mr. Milner said: “Big Internet companies on average are capable of generating revenue of $1-million per employee, and that compares to 10 to 20 per cent of that which is normally generated by traditional offline businesses of comparable size.” As an illustration, he cited Facebook, where, he said, each single engineer supports one million users.

Finally – and Mr. Milner admitted this was “a bit of a futuristic picture” – he predicted “the emergence of the global brain, which consists of all the humans connected to each other and to the machine and interacting in a very unique and profound way, creating an intelligence that does not belong to any single human being or computer.”
Chrystia_Freeland  Yuri_Milner  e-commerce  Industrial_Internet  tech-utopianism  networks  connected_devices  platforms  collective_intelligence  efficiencies  inefficiencies 
october 2011 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read