recentpopularlog in

jerryking : television   162

« earlier  
Mary Tyler Moore Show star Valerie Harper dies at 80 - The Globe and Mail
JOHN ROGERS
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, UNITED STATES
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PUBLISHED 3 HOURS AGO
'70s  obituaries  sitcoms  television  women 
6 weeks ago by jerryking
Opinion | The Best Year of Our Lives
April 6, 2019 | The New York Times | By Ross Douthat.

There’s a theory of human psychology that holds that the time you enter maturity becomes fixed in your mind as a civilizational peak — with everything since a falling-off that conveniently matches your own stagger toward the grave. Thus it doesn’t matter if you came of age in the Great Depression or some other nadir; because you were 18 then, it must have been a golden age......I’ve been thinking about how good we had it lately because we’re 20 years out from 1999, and the cultural press is thick with reminders that it was a pop-culture annus mirabilis — from the premiere of “The Sopranos” that defined a golden age of television, to the yearlong cascade of brilliant movies .....from a Hollywood not yet captive to the superhero era......Widen the aperture a little, so that the “Xennial” cultural era covers 1995 to 2005, and you get everything from the perfection of the sitcom (late “Seinfeld,” season one of “Friends,” the silver age of “The Simpsons,” “Arrested Development”) to the peak of HBO (when “The Wire” and “The Sopranos” and “Deadwood” and “Sex and the City” were all airing). Oh, and those were also the days when George R.R. Martin could publish three “Game of Thrones” novels in five years, inventing all the good parts of the TV show’s plot in an end-of-millennium rush.....cold hard economic data also suggest that ours was a uniquely blessed coming-of-age: a time of low unemployment, surging productivity, strong working-class wage growth — and all without a huge overhang of public and private debt.......a statement about generational experiences, Alter was basically right. If you were born around 1980, you grew up in a space happily between — between eras of existential threat (Cold War/War on Terror, or Cold War/climate change), between foreign policy debacles (Vietnam/Iraq), between epidemics (crack and AIDS/opioids and suicide), and between two different periods of economic stagnation (the ’70s and early Aughts).
'90s  op-ed  Alexandria_Ocasio-Cortez  annus_mirabilis  coming-of-age  cultural_gatekeepers  films  generational_touchstones  golden_age  millennials  movies  noughties  popular_culture  Ross_Douthat  television  shared_consciousness  shared_experiences 
april 2019 by jerryking
With the iPhone Sputtering, Apple Bets Its Future on TV and News
March 25, 2019 | WSJ | By Tripp Mickle.

The iPhone is running out of juice. To go beyond the device that made Apple Inc. a global colossus, Tim Cook is betting on a suite of services—marking the company’s biggest shift in more than a decade......Apple will take a giant leap forward announcing video- and news-subscription services that it hopes will generate billions of dollars in new annual revenue and deepen ties between iPhone users and the company.....apps and services, from Spotify to Netflix to China’s WeChat , have often become more important to users than the devices that run them. .....The company’s ambition in video is to become an alternative to cable, combining original series with shows from other networks to create a new entertainment service that can reach more than 100 markets world-wide. ....Apple hasn’t said what it will charge for the programming. .....The original series will be delivered in a new TV app that staff have been calling a Netflix killer.....Apple has been negotiating to bring its new TV app to multiple platforms, including Roku and smart TVs.........Apple plans to showcase a revamped News app that includes a premium tier with access to more than 200 magazines—including Bon Appétit, People and Glamour—as well as newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal.....The Washington Post and New York Times aren’t participating in the new app...... in the early 2000s, co-founder Steve Jobs reinvented the company by pushing it into mobile devices. The iPod and its accompanying iTunes service revived a company that was largely dependent on Mac computer sales....Mr. Cook is attempting a similar feat in the approaching twilight of the smartphone era....Cook wanted to know which apps were selling well, how many Apple Music subscribers stuck with the service, and how many people were signing up for iCloud storage.....Apple’s biggest source of services revenue comes from distributing other companies’ software through its App Store.....Apple’s music-streaming service has about 50 million global subscribers—far behind Spotify’s 96 million.

Apple’s base of 1.4 billion iPhones, iPads and Macs in use globally gives it a distribution platform..................The push into news subscriptions could help Apple battle Facebook, whose News Feed has helped it become the No. 1 app world-wide in monthly active smartphone users.....Facebook is attempting to become a super-app like China’s WeChat, which allows users to shop, order food, buy movie tickets and make reservations on any mobile operating system......Steve Jobs foreshadowed Apple’s services future when he started iTunes in 2001, offering categories from competing major labels to make the first successful digital-music store, with songs available for 99 cents.

For Mr. Cook’s monthly services meetings, the company monitors of apps that benefit and threaten Apple. There is a "release radar" for Cook to track apps that are expected to sell well and other metrics for the apps that have challenged Apple’s business, including iTunes sales decreases compared with Apple Music subscription growth.
App_Store  Apple  Apple_IDs  Apple_Music  big_bets  CEOs  cloud_computing  Disney  iCloud  iPhone  iTunes  magazines  mobile_applications  multiplatforms  Netflix  news  NYT  original_content  pivots  platforms  services  smartphones  Spotify  storage  streaming  subscriptions  television  Tim_Cook  WaPo  WeChat 
march 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | Luke Perry Had a Stroke and Died. I Had One and Lived.
March 5, 2019 | The New York Times | By Kara Swisher, Contributing Opinion Writer.

Kara Swisher was 49 years old, healthy and had none of the conditions--symptoms--like high blood pressure that might predict a stroke...yet she had one after arriving in Hong Kong after a long flight...not hydrating or walking around enough on the long flight to Hong Kong, created what the doctor, who immediately started the treatment of anticoagulant drugs and others, called a “hole in one.”.....The idea of death — the absolute nearness of it — has been ever-present for Kara Swisher. Since her dad died, she's lived her life as if she had no time at all or very little, making the kinds of choices of someone who knew that tomorrow might indeed be her last.

[Stanford University in 2005 by the Apple founder and tech visionary Steve Jobs:

For the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been no for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything — all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure — these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.]

.....Sometimes {Steve Jobs'] urgency manifested itself in inspiration, sometimes in meanness, sometimes in humor, sometimes in seriousness. But it was always urgent.......[recast in my words...I have both the privilege to live more days on earth and the awareness that those days are limited.

Be tough-minded going forward--Basically, I don’t have the time to be so careless in what I do and I don’t have the time to not to ask the same of you.].........You get this kind of nudge again and again from death. It is, as the Buddhist teacher Frank Ostaseski noted, “a secret teacher hiding in plain sight.” Luke Perry’s death was yet another lesson from that teacher. ....... Mr. Perry’s Dylan McKay, who was given to saying things like, “The only person you can trust in this world is yourself.”
'90s  actors  hydration  Kara_Swisher  Luke_Perry  midlife  mini-stroke  mybestlife  op-ed  tips  speeches  Stanford  Steve_Jobs  strokes  symptoms  television  travel  It's_up_to_me  urgency  long-haul  deaths 
march 2019 by jerryking
Offering Inspiration and Advice, Real Vision Is HGTV for Hedge Fund Hopefuls - The New York Times
By Landon Thomas Jr.
Oct. 2, 2018

Real Vision offers a way to skip the traditional hedge fund path: slog away at an investment bank or a mutual fund, then settle down in Midtown Manhattan or Greenwich, Conn. For a modest fee, Real Vision will connect investors to a network of elite Wall Street analysts, traders and hedge fund managers, making it easier for novices like Mr. O’Dea to jump the line.

Raoul Pal, a former hedge fund executive who also worked at Goldman Sachs and runs an investment strategy service called Global Macro Investor, co-founded Real Vision. Since then, 20,000 people have signed up, paying $180 a year to hear directly from financial insiders.

It is a vibrant community with an average age of 38, which distinguishes it from CNBC and its more mature audience. Mixing the Netflix payment model with a cozy interview style, Real Vision offers to help upstart investors decode the mysteries of today’s markets. It features those insiders presenting their views in lengthy, explanatory videos: How to short China, the long-term opportunities in emerging markets and the best way to play Bitcoin, among others.
hedge_funds  television  inspiration  subscriptions  investors  explanatory 
october 2018 by jerryking
Beyond Netflix: Fall’s Must-See Streaming TV - WSJ
By Joshua Fruhlinger
Sept. 14, 2017

+ Acorn TV

If you want more adventurous (and brag-worthy) fall viewing, look beyond the usual suspects to the myriad specialized, niche streaming services offering everything from Korean soap operas to B-horror.

To tune in, you’ll need a smart TV or a streaming device like Apple TV or Google Chromecast. (A game console, like an Xbox or PlayStation, will work, too.) Of course, you can also watch on a computer, tablet, or smartphone.
niches  streaming  television  Netflix  HBO_Go  Amazon_Prime 
september 2017 by jerryking
The music industry dances to the beat of TV revenue - The Globe and Mail
September 4, 2017 | Globe and Mail | by JOSH O’KANE.

Toronto's Barenaked Ladies first blew up in the 1990s, when CDs were king. But music sales have since collapsed and streaming services such as Spotify have replaced some, but not nearly all, of that revenue. Bands such as Mr. Robertson's have made up for lost sales in large part by touring. As the fall TV season begins – including The Big Bang Theory's season premiere later this month – getting music on a TV show, film or commercial is becoming an increasingly enticing revenue stream for musicians and the businesses that back them.

As streaming-video platforms keep adding new, original shows and films on top of traditional broadcast channels, the opportunities to license music increase as well. The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, the recorded music industry's global lobby group, reports that in 2016 Canada brought in $7.8-million (U.S.) in "synchronization" revenue for artists and labels from using music in TV, film, ads and video games.

While that represents less than 1 per cent of total revenue, it's a 32-per-cent increase over the previous year, signalling growing attention for recordings' revenue stream. Meanwhile, SOCAN – which collects royalties for songwriters and music publishers in Canada – says more than a third of all of its royalty revenue comes from TV sources.
films  licensing  music  musicians  music_industry  music_publishing  royalties  streaming  songwriters  television 
september 2017 by jerryking
Will Packer Starting Production Company With Backing From Discovery and Universal
JULY 25, 2017 | The New York Times | By MICAH MAIDENBERG.

Mr. Will Packer, 43, is already known as one of the prominent African-American producers in Hollywood, with movies that have grossed more than $1 billion.....best known for his work in movies, including the “Ride Along” films and “The Wedding Ringer.” Now he wants to take aim at consumers using just about every other form of contemporary media.....Packer is starting a new company, Will Packer Media, with backing from Discovery Communications and Universal Pictures. The new entity aims to develop a wide range of programming, from television shows and documentaries to short-form digital videos and advertising campaigns.....telling stories the way that a given story should be told...without having to look at it as one particular type of content for one particular medium.”.....To support the company’s planned advertising campaigns, Will Packer Media bought a marketing and technology company called Narrative that was founded in 2013 by the mogul Russell Simmons and the advertising executive Tricia Clarke-Stone. The company will take the name WP Narrative.

Ms. Clarke-Stone said combining her enterprise with Mr. Packer’s new company would allow for storytelling at the intersection of entertainment, innovation and branding. Working with Mr. Packer, for example, will give her team greater access to Hollywood talent.

“Brands now have a new standard they have to live by,” she said, explaining that they must act as broadcasters, publishers and entertainers. ”That’s the only way to engage with audiences.”
Hollywood  African-Americans  storytelling  movies  packaging  documentaries  short-form  video  producers  television  advertising  Discovery  Universal  films  brands 
july 2017 by jerryking
Peter Mansbridge anchors his final edition of CBC’s The National - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 30, 2017

Last September, when Mansbridge announced his retirement, I wrote a column with the headline It’s About Time: We’ve Put Up With Mansbridge And His Pompous Ilk For Too Long. It acknowledged at the start that it might seem ungracious and harsh.

It argued against the traditional anchor position, which Mansbridge has embodied, and declared that the reverence for the job is outdated and, essentially, redundant.

About half the readers thought it too harsh and about half applauded the content. It caused some hurt feelings. Sometimes a critic does that, expressing the unsentimental view.

Oddly enough, CBC seems to be agreeing with the views expressed about the traditional anchor role and is moving away, post-Mansbridge, to a multihost format rather than anchoring The National in one middle-aged man who delivers the news.

Whatever the new format might be, Peter Mansbridge will be missed by many. Understandably, given his skills and achievements.

Cheers, Pastor, and may the retirement be pleasant and fruitful.
Peter_Mansbridge  farewells  retirement  CBC  unsentimental  television  journalists  Canada150  John_Doyle 
july 2017 by jerryking
Samuel L. Jackson and Others on Black British Actors in American Roles - The New York Times
By CHRISTOPHER D. SHEA MARCH 9, 2017
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Pin
Email
More
actors  Black_British  African-Americans  Hollywood  diversity  visible_minorities  television  films  movies 
march 2017 by jerryking
Dick Clark Productions to Be Sold to Chinese Company for $1 Billion
NOV. 4, 2016 | The New York Times | By AMIE TSANG.

Dalian Wanda Group said on Friday that it would buy Dick Clark Productions for about $1 billion, giving it the broadcasting rights to the Golden Globe Awards, the Academy of Country Music Awards and the New Year countdown celebrations in New York. Dalian Wanda has been on a multibillion-dollar spending spree in the entertainment industry. It is the world’s biggest owner of movie theaters, with complexes across the United States, Europe and Australia.....Wanda had bought and strengthened struggling companies like AMC Theaters and Legendary...This is Wanda's first step into television production. The company noted in a news release that it would be “occupying the highest-end TV program resources from the start,” adding that these television rights would be “complementary” to its focus on film, tourism and sports.
FDI  mergers_&_acquisitions  China  television  entertainment  entertainment_industry  Dalian_Wanda 
november 2016 by jerryking
Live Streaming Breaks Through, and Cable News Has Much to Fear - The New York Times
Farhad Manjoo
STATE OF THE ART JULY 13, 2016
Continue reading the main storyShare This Page
Share
Tweet
Email
More
livestreaming  Facebook  television  CATV  Farhad_Manjoo 
july 2016 by jerryking
Pillars of Black Media, Once Vibrant, Now Fighting for Survival - The New York Times
JULY 2, 2016 | NYT | By SYDNEY EMBER and NICHOLAS FANDOS.

As racial issues have once again become a prominent topic in the national conversation, the influence of black-owned media companies on black culture is diminishing.

“Ebony used to be the only thing black folks had and read,” Ms. Spann-Cooper said. “As we became more integrated into society, we had other options.”

Continue reading the main story
To that end, Time Inc. now owns the magazine Essence and Viacom owns Black Entertainment Television. The Oprah Winfrey Network, a partnership between Ms. Winfrey and Discovery Communications, has been around since 2011. The Undefeated, ESPN’s site covering the intersection of race and sports, debuted in May. The emergence of Black Twitter has also given African-Americans a powerful voice on social media.

Johnson Publishing stressed that the Clear View Group, the private equity firm that bought Jet and Ebony, was an African-American-led company and positioned the sale more as a partnership. “...Traditional media companies have struggled for years to adapt to a digital world, but the pressure on black-owned media has been even more acute. Many are smaller and lack the financial resources to compete in an increasingly consolidated media landscape. Advertisers have turned away from black-oriented media, owners say, under the belief that they can now reach minorities in other ways.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
See my Pinboard reference to [Carol Williams' concern] that agencies catering to multicultural audiences employ mass marketing strategies that look to target such consumers simply by casting minorities in ads, or making assumptions based on social media data.

“It becomes an issue of, ‘If they see themselves in a commercial, they’ll buy the product,’ rather than it being about the messaging and how that messaging is delivered to them,” she said.

Some companies are also using digital technology to “withdraw what they perceive as insights out of these communities,” she added, instead of “developing research techniques to really get to know this culture.”
African-Americans  owners  digital_media  mass_media  FCC  broadcasting  publishing  consolidation  television  culture  magazines  radio  black-owned  Carol_Williams  Essence  Ebony  print_journalism 
july 2016 by jerryking
Five habits that helped Joshua Jackson bulk up his acting resume - The Globe and Mail
COURTNEY SHEA
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Nov. 29, 2015 12:00PM EST
Last updated Sunday, Nov. 29, 2015

To be creative, you have to be prepared

How to be a real man (on camera)

The trouble with the trappings

It’s okay to dress like a grown-up

Throw yourself in front of the (figurative) train
habits  actors  television  HBO  creativity  playing_in_traffic  preparation 
november 2015 by jerryking
An ailing titan of the small screen
October 10-11| FT| By Matthew Garrahan

In its 1980s heyday, MTV was the coolest brand in media. The music video channel was name-checked in pop hits, helped turn acts such as Michael Jackson into h...
Sumner_Redstone  moguls  MTV  Viacom  television  aging  CBS  digital_media 
november 2015 by jerryking
TV Networks Borrow Page From Digital Rivals to Attract Advertisers - NYTimes.com
MAY 11, 2015 | NYT | By SYDNEY EMBER.

Coca-Cola is just one of many brands now shifting advertising budgets to digital and social media, which offer the promise of better consumer data and the ability to reach targeted audiences....“Everyone is coming out with a data play, a data product, right now,” said Jeff Lucas, head of sales for Viacom Media Networks, whose channels include MTV and Nickelodeon.

Television networks, which rely on the upfront season for tens of billions of ad dollars, are facing declining ratings and heightened competition from digital outlets. And while television still dominates the ad market, with some $70 billion in ad spending last year in the United States, online ad spending is swelling. In particular, digital video, which attracted $5.8 billion in ad spending in the United States last year, is expected to grow to $7.8 billion this year and to $12.8 billion by 2018, according to the research firm eMarketer.....the line between TV and digital is blurring, and that advertisers care more about the effectiveness of their ads than where they run.
Coca-Cola  television  advertising  digital_media  online_advertising  web_video  Hulu  tools  brands  effectiveness  data_driven 
may 2015 by jerryking
Don’t Confuse Jeremy Piven with Ari Gold - NYTimes.com
By RUTH LA FERLA APRIL 17, 2015

Ari “leads through intimidation,” he said. “He’s an equal opportunity offender.” Selfridge, on the other hand, “operates from the heart.”

Mr. Piven himself seems to operate from a disarming mixture of naked self-interest and an unalloyed passion for his métier. Before “Entourage,” he said: “I was never progressing. I was still the schlumpy best friend No. 6.”

During lunch the next day at Bubby’s, a favorite haunt in TriBeCa, he picked up the thread. “I’ve been the underdog my entire life — 1,000 percent,” he said. But Mr. Piven is nothing if not tenacious. “Beyond sharp elbows, you’ve got to create your own work,” he said, “to make a meal out of the scraps that you’re given.”

Early in the taping of “Entourage,” which ran for eight seasons on HBO starting in 2004, he hogged the camera and filled dead air with a barrage of hastily improvised banter. “It was awkward at first,” he acknowledged. “People were asking, ‘Who is this guy and what does he think he is doing?’

“But I just kept talking and they didn’t yell, ‘Cut.’ And suddenly one scene turns to three.”
Entourage  actors  television  funnies  underdogs  tenacity  rainmakers  value_creation  opportunistic  creating_valuable_content 
april 2015 by jerryking
The Canadian connection to P&G’s 'Like a Girl' campaign - The Globe and Mail
SUSAN KRASHINSKY - MARKETING REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 02 2015
Susan_Krashinsky  P&G  Super_Bowl  television  advertising  girls  daughters 
february 2015 by jerryking
Mobile Apps : Books, Video, Research & More : Toronto Public Library
BookMyne
BookMyne (developed by library vendor SirsiDynix) allows you to check your account, search the catalogue, and place holds

OverDrive
Use the OverDrive app to download ebooks and eaudiobooks directly to your tablet or phone.

OneClickDigital
Download and listen to audiobooks on your device

Zinio
Download full current issues of popular magazines to read on your mobile device.

Hoopla
Stream music, movies and television episodes through the Hoopla app, or download for offline viewing.

Naxos Music Library
Listen to streaming classical music and jazz through the Naxos Music Library app.

Mango Languages
More than 34 foreign language courses and 14 English as a second language courses
mobile_applications  libraries  TPL  e-books  streaming  digital_media  movies  television  magazines  audiobooks 
february 2015 by jerryking
Stuart Scott, ESPN Anchor, Dies at 49 - WSJ
By ANDREW BEATON
Updated Jan. 5, 2015

“When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer,” Mr. Scott said in accepting the award. “You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, and in the manner in which you live.”
obituaries  tributes  cancers  sports  African-Americans  television  ESPN  sportscasting 
january 2015 by jerryking
Satire and heavy-handed sermons as The Newsroom ends - The Globe and Mail
ALESSANDRA STANLEY
The New York Times News Service
Published Monday, Dec. 15 2014
HBO  television  sentimentality  journalism  comedy  exits 
december 2014 by jerryking
How a Netflix for sports could be a game-changer - The Globe and Mail
IAN McGUGAN
How a Netflix for sports could be a game-changer Add to ...
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Oct. 08 2014,
sports  NBA  NHL  NFL  television  Netflix  broadcasting  streaming 
october 2014 by jerryking
It’s time to be honest: Netflix is parasitic - The Globe and Mail
SIMON HOUPT
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 03 2014,

Most industrialized countries subsidize domestic television and film production, partly because of scale: It costs a lot of money to make shows look even half as glossy as the stuff coming out of Hollywood, and if there’s a limited audience (say, because you’ve set your miniseries in the shipyards of Gdansk because you think it’s important that your fellow Poles know about their history), you’re probably not going to make your money back. American film and TV studios have global marketing machines to get their shows in front of consumers.

As it happens, Canadians do watch plenty of homemade TV, and not just hockey: Last month’s season finale of The Amazing Race Canada on CTV was the most-watched show of that week, with more than three million viewers. (Necessary disclosure: CTV’s parent company BCE Inc. owns 15 per cent of The Globe and Mail. Unnecessary disclosure: I’ve never watched The Amazing Race Canada.) Scripted dramas and comedies are popular, too – though they certainly don’t pull in the numbers here that Big Bang Theory does. Millions still tune in to domestic news and current affairs shows. And just try telling Mike Holmes, Sarah Richardson, Debbie Travis and, frankly, Ben Mulroney that Canadians don’t watch Canadian-made TV.

If you’re fine with all that disappearing because hey, Netflix is awesome and a sexy disruptor, so be it: That’s your choice, and you’re free to make it. Plenty of people love their weekly pilgrimage to Walmart and Costco, too.

But please, at least be honest with yourself and recognize that Netflix, like the retail disruptor Walmart before it, is a parasitic enterprise. Netflix is currently pocketing an estimated $300-million a year from Canadian consumers. Its total investment in original Canadian programming so far? One season of Trailer Park Boys: 10 half-hour episodes of cheaply made TV.
Netflix  CRTC  Simon_Houpt  television  disruption  Wal-Mart  parasitic 
october 2014 by jerryking
The CRTC needs to start thinking outside the idiot box - The Globe and Mail
The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Sep. 27 2014,

...Watching CRTC commissioners questioning cable-company executives and other stakeholders about whether Canadians should be able to choose which channels they pay for made it painfully clear that the commission’s usefulness is being outstripped by technology. ..The new scarce resource is not bandwidth, but viewers. Broadcasters and cable carriers that once had captive markets now compete with Netflix, Youtube and other Internet-based services that exist outside CRTC regulations. These newcomers, including millions of people producing and posting their own content, from Vines to videos, are stealing viewers and changing Canadians’ habits.....the reason why the CRTC still talks "television" – is because it remains the only avenue for Canada’s heavily regulated broadcasters and cable companies to hold onto their current revenue streams while they buy time and figure out what their next move should be. The CRTC’s most critical role – ensuring Canada’s stories are told, as required under the Broadcasting Act – has lately transmogrified from obliging broadcasters to produce Canadian content, and making sure the cable companies prioritize it, to something a little less noble: namely, temporarily protecting Canadian companies from the stateless, unregulated, market-driven onslaught of the Internet....There are significant advances coming down the pipe that are going to get here faster than the end of your next two-year cable contract. This is where the CRTC should be focusing its energies. The future is not “pick-and-pay”; the future is fibre-optic Internet in every home that is magnitudes faster than the current co-axial standard, and which will become the backbone of the digital economy.... The future is not limiting access or enforcing nationalistic content rules; the future is more border-ignoring services with more content than ever, some of which will inevitably be Canadian. The future is asking the question, Do we need a national television broadcaster, or would we be better off subsidizing a national content producer that sells its programming to the highest bidder? Or produces it with a taxpayer subsidy – and then instead of broadcasting via a traditional TV channel, simply posts it online for anyone to watch on Youtube and other sites?

Talking about TV – about pick-and-pay and basic packages and Canadian content – is at best a distraction while the future barrels down on us.
Netflix  Canada  CRTC  streaming  data  roaming  CATV  television  scarcity  statelessness  bandwidth  Youtube  future  Vine  content  DIY  bite-sized 
september 2014 by jerryking
‘The Hippest Trip in America’ and ‘Soul Train’ - NYTimes.com
By ROSEMARY BRAY McNATTMAY 30, 2014.

THE HIPPEST TRIP IN AMERICA
Soul Train and the Evolutionof Culture and Style
By Nelson George
Illustrated. 236 pp. William Morrow/HarperCollins Publishers. $27.99.

SOUL TRAIN
The Music, Dance, and Style of a Generation
By Questlove
Illustrated. 239 pp. Harper Design/HarperCollins Publishers. $45.
books  African-Americans  book_reviews  entertainment_industry  television  soul  music_industry 
june 2014 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria: ‘There is a market for intelligent discussion on television’ - The Globe and Mail
JAMES BRADSHAW
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 16 2014

How would you describe the tenor of international political debate on television today, whether on your network, CNN, or Fox or The Daily Show with Jon Stewart?

It doesn’t take much observation to see that we unfortunately do not have a serious conversation about international affairs on television. I think that, in the media in general, it’s pretty high-quality, if you look at print, if you look at the new websites, some of which are really very good. Television, for some reason, has not been able to sustain that. Obviously, it’s different in Canada – CBC, I think commendably, does it.

What’s dramatic is the complete collapse of foreign news in network news. When you look at what NBC was doing in foreign coverage, I wouldn’t be surprised if they had 30 to 40 times as much in the 1980s as they do now. That’s the real drawdown.

Your show gets credit for trying to have sophisticated discussions. Is there a market for that in the U.S., or is your international audience creating the appetite?

We get a good audience in the United States. We don’t get a big blowout audience or anything, but it’s a very loyal audience. We are one of the most DVR-ed shows on CNN, so we are appointment viewing in a way that very few shows are on news channels because news is perishable by nature. I think there is a market for intelligent discussion on television. Television has a kind of haiku-like precision, if you use it well. You don’t have a lot of space – the entire transcript of my show would fit on one page of The New York Times. It can be incredibly powerful, and it’s incredibly exacting.
Fareed_Zakaria  television  salons  CNN  public_discourse  international_affairs  drawdowns  sophisticated  high-quality 
may 2014 by jerryking
« earlier      
per page:    204080120160

Copy this bookmark:





to read