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These six harmful things will prevent your success - The Globe and Mail
ROY OSING
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED 18 HOURS AGO

(1) NOT ENOUGH CONTACTS
(2) TOO MUCH RELIANCE ON EDUCATION
(3) COPYING OTHERS
(4) THE WRONG KIND OF MENTOR
(5) NOT STAYING ON THE LEARNING PATH
(6) RELIANCE ON WHAT WORKED YESTERDAY
career_ending_moves  Communicating_&_Connecting  differentiation  Managing_Your_Career  networks  torchbearers  weak_links  copycats  missteps  personal_connections  Roy_Osing 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
Six ways to get noticed and get ahead
JUNE 25, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by ROY OSING, SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL.

**INVISIBILITY BEGETS IGNORABILITY
Get noticed in a crowd of people all looking to advance themselves. Be competent in your current role, of course, but stand out.....Develop a “be visible” plan that, in a simple and factual way, presents your achievements and what you do day-in and day-out to execute your organization’s strategy.

**VALUE IS THE END GAME
Create value that people care about. The focus must be on the benefits you create for the organization (and for people), .....Realize that the project or task you’ve been given is just the internal vehicle for adding value. Keep your eyes on your contribution to the marketplace within which your organization operates.

**DIFFERENCES MUST DEFINE YOU
Be the only one that does what you do:

* Invent your own problem-solving method using crowd sourcing, or canvassing others;
* Do more of what was asked;
* Do the opposite of what the pundits preach;
* Use trusted external resources for added credibility;
* Launch additional projects from your original task.

** DOING IT IS 10 TIMES BETTER THAN TALKING ABOUT IT
“A little less conversation, a little more action please.” – Elvis Presley

It’s not about intent; it’s about getting stuff done in the trenches where life is messy and people never behave the way you expect them to.

**FIND A ‘DONE IT’ MENTOR
Find a mentor who has done stuff.....plenty of smart people who have achieved less than their potential because they put all their trust in the way things should work – based on theory – as opposed to pouring their energy into finding a way to make them work in the hard realities of people’s biases and internal politics.

My mentors always had the subliminal tag “master crafter in doing stuff” associated with their name.

** BE OPEN TO ANYTHING
Do anything asked of you and do it with eagerness and an open mind. Don't be too picky.... upwardly mobile people are expected to overreach every once in a while, to go for something that is beyond their capability.
action_plans  advice  differentiation  execution  ignorability  implementation  individual_initiative  internal_politics  invisibility  in_the_real_world  Managing_Your_Career  mentoring  messiness  movingonup  new_graduates  open_mind  overdeliver  overreach  realities  Roy_Osing  sophisticated  torchbearers  urgency  value_creation 
june 2019 by jerryking
Be a Potentiator - Mike Lipkin
April 25, 2019 | @ #CAIF2019 | Presentation and speech By Mike Lipkin.

1. Be Self-Savvy: Define your principles. Discern your impact. Play your role. Know what drives you. Know how you’re occurring to others. Know their expectations of you. Know thyself and thy relationship with others.
2. Develop Situational Sensibility: Get out there. Know the trends. Connect the dots. Context is decisive. Whoever understands their environment best wins. So expand your footprint. Study the data until it tells the truth. Anticipate the future by getting there first. Become your peers’ scout. Discover the new world for yourself and other will want to join you.
3. Make a Powerful Promise: Declare your purpose. Express your value proposition. Focus your execution. Know your personal mission. Know the unique benefit you give to others. Act accordingly. So my mission is to turn people into potentiators. My unique benefit is to excite people into remarkable action. I’m executing my promise through motivational messages like this one in any way I can. What are you doing?
4. Become Sublimely Skilled: Practice for real. Become the authority. Make it a pleasure. Whatever your level, be the best at that level. Learn from every experience. Communicate your knowledge with conviction. Light others up with your joie de vivre.
5. Build Robust Resilience: Interpret to win. Be prolific. Train like an athlete. We’re only as good as the stories that we tell ourselves. Make whatever happens meaningful. Do more things. Put the odds on your side. And train, train, train. Stamina is the rocket fuel of champions.
6. Grow Courageous Creativity: Unleash your imagination. Experiment like Edison. Talk, listen, learn. Dare to dream then declare your dream. Turn it into reality by trying something new. Fail fast until you fly high. Get in front of people and give them great conversation. Enrich their perspective while you expand yours.
7. Be Fanatically Faithworthy: Commit to your commitments. Come through in the crunch. Be the best you can be, every day. If you say it, do it. Make your word the one thing that others can always depend on. Become the go-to-person in a crisis. And, whatever happens, bring your A-Game every time. You can’t always be the best, but you can always be the best you can be that day.
8. Create Close Connections: Give First. Open yourself up. Become an insider. Generosity pays big dividends. Show what you can give them and others will show you the money. Get up, close and personal. Become integral to others’ wellbeing. If you build their trust, they will pay it forward all the way back to you.
9. Communicate Like a Champion: Say it like you mean it. Talk their language. Connect them to their purpose. How you say what you say is as important as what you say. Let your authenticity shine through but inject it with your passion. Be the reason why other people rediscover why they make a difference.
10. Cause Bold Breakthroughs: Own it. Celebrate the struggle. Finish like a professional. It’s not about the title. It’s about your skin in the game. It’s about taking on the responsibility for everyone else’s success, no matter what. You can’t always win, but you can always play to win. It’s meant to be hard. The pain is the price you pay to be a potentiator. Close strong and the force will be with you.
breakthroughs  CAIF  code_switching  commitments  Communicating_&_Connecting  connecting_the_dots  execution  inspiration  It's_up_to_me  Mike_Lipkin  motivations  purpose  self-awareness  self-knowledge  self-made  serving_others  situational_awareness  skin_in_the_game  torchbearers  value_propositions 
april 2019 by jerryking
Overcoming adversity: In the footsteps of polar explorer Shackleton
December 22, 2018 | Financial Times | by Sarah Gordon.

In 2013 Tim Jarvis, an adventurer and environmental scientist, re-enacted Sir Ernest Shackleton’s 1916 epic journey, sailing a replica of his boat 1,500km across the Southern Ocean from Antarctica, where Shackleton’s men were stranded for more than a year, to South Georgia island, then climbing over its mountainous interior to the site of the whaling station where Shackleton finally found help.....Mr Jarvis’ team used the same rudimentary equipment, clothing, rations and technology as had been used a century earlier......Jarvis' Shackleton expedition, like the original, hit numerous hurdles:
(1) loss of a sponsor;
(2) a gruelling sea leg of their journey, navigating storms and treacherous currents to reach South Georgia;
(3) three of the six team members had trench foot and some frostbite and were unable to embark on the next phase, the mountain climb across the island.

Jarvis coped by “trying to take a leaf out of Shackleton’s book”, keeping people busy, staying completely focused himself and “not even entertaining” the thought of stopping. He and the other lead climber, former Marine Baz Gray, isolated themselves in order to stop others’ negativity clouding their judgment before tackling the mountains ahead. There were no rows, says Mr Jarvis, but there were tears......“If you feel that at some level the risk and the fear are worth it, you will overcome it.”.....Choosing the right team for a challenge as extreme as this required unorthodox methods. For Mr Jarvis, the best team is about people whose skills complement one another rather than just the best individuals. But he also needed to make sure that team members could really do what they said they could....You don't want “employees”. “When the chips are down, you want someone who feels that they’ve invested a lot in [the expedition] and it’s theirs . . . ”Jarvis believes the expedition taught him how to set a positive example, how to recognise which buttons to press to get people to apply themselves more, and how to deal with “multi-dimensional” challenges, not just physical, but reputational and financial. “On the sea I wasn’t the best sailor. On the land I wasn’t the best climber. All you’ve got is your leadership, your conviction that you can pull it off, your bloody-minded determination to continue.”
adversity  Antartica  Ernest_Shackleton  expeditions  explorers  leadership  multidimensional  negativity_bias  obstacles  pessimism  teams  re-enactments  selection_processes  South_Pole  torchbearers  unorthodox 
december 2018 by jerryking
How to approach your own career like an entrepreneur - Fortune
1. Choose growth over profitability. Rather than focus on short-term gains, think long-term goals and what you need to get there.
2. Bet on who you want to work with, not on where. Job seekers should invest in people, not ideas. That means pick the place you’re going to work for the people you’re going to work with. They’re the ones who will train you and lead you to other opportunities when the time comes.
3. Find your special sauce. Fetishize your product-market fit. This may be one of the hardest challenges in the new economy.
4. Celebrate uncertainty. Iterate. Seek feedback and adapt. Pivot where necessary.
5. Be public. Be on Linkedin. Give away hard-won information and knowledge, you’ll get something back. Be more transparent.

Nitin Julka was 31 and working like a dog in Cleveland when he got the itch. For six years he’d been a VP of his family’s business, a $20 million company that sold IT to schools. He had moved home after getting an MBA, excited to grow the company and make a difference in educational technology. It had been a “wild ride,” but he was ready for change. “I had no idea what I wanted to do,” he says. “I just knew I wanted to do something different.”

The jobs that interested him most were in tech. He started calling friends, friends of friends, business school classmates, and even distant contacts to talk about Bay Area companies and about what professional roles he might actually qualify for. After 30 or so conversations, he made up his mind: He wanted to be a product manager at a fast-growing Silicon Valley–based startup.

This struck few as a logical or even feasible next step for Julka: “I was changing job functions, industries, and geographies. People told me you can do one of those things—not all three at once.”

But Julka is more self-aware than most. On a quarterly basis, he conducts a life assessment and reviews what he considers to be his professional competitive advantage. Among his “most unique” attributes he lists his receptiveness to feedback. Indeed, in his quest for continual improvement, he has recorded personal and professional feedback in a single, running Google doc since 2010. He reads it once a week, when prompted by a recurring calendar invite.

And so began what Julka considers the “abnormal part” of his job search: He drew up a spreadsheet of 60 target companies, a few of which he researched for 60 to 80 hours (he admits he “overinvested”). He read 10-Ks and 10-Qs and a hundred CrunchBase articles; he mined his personal and virtual connections; he enlisted a friend, a former Google programmer, to tutor him in code; and he found free online videos from which he learned UX/UI design. With his wife’s support, he gave himself five weeks in Silicon Valley—no mean feat given that he had an 18-month-old baby at home. He met with three or more people a day, prepared a 48-page set of interview notes, and rode the highs and lows of pitching himself for a job that many thought he was an odd fit for.

It ended on a high. In September 2013 he got several job offers—including one, through a contact of his business school professor, at Bizo, a startup that has since been acquired by LinkedIn LNKD .

Julka may sound like a case study in craziness, a modern-day Ben Franklin whose entrepreneurial energy and efforts cannot be easily matched. But while he exists at one extreme, he’s the prototype for what it takes to navigate one’s career these days.

The truth is, wherever you are on the corporate ladder, whatever you do for a living, you’ve got to think like you’re launching a business from the ground up.

As LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha wrote in their zeitgeist-tapping book from 2012, The Start-Up of You, “All humans are entrepreneurs.” To accelerate your career in today’s economy, you’ve got to embrace that spirit and apply the Silicon Valley formula—“adapt to the future” and “invest in yourself”—no matter how comfortable in your job you might be.

Imagine you’re a founder. You’ve been working for days—years, really. (You can’t remember the last time you took a day off.) You’ve networked like crazy. And now, at last, you’ve landed one of those much-coveted meetings with a high-profile venture capital firm on Sand Hill Road.

the start up of you bookIt feels as though you’ve been waiting your whole life for this: You’ve prepared your slide deck, rehearsed your pitch, and honed your talking points. You’re ready to be grilled about even the finest details of your marketing and monetization strategies. You’ve gone so far as to research your VC’s hobbies. But the product you’re selling isn’t some whiz-bang app or the latest and greatest cloud-computing platform; the product is you.

Here’s where your potential backer steps in: What’s your competitive advantage, she asks? The questions come rapid-fire: What’s your addressable market? The opportunities for growth? Your five-year plan? Your 10-year plan?

You may not be used to thinking about your career in such calculating terms, but old standards like “follow your passion” get you only so far. You won’t get Series A funding, but the analogy is apt: If you are the startup, you’d better start answering to your inner VC.

“You’ve got to have a sense of purpose, authenticity, self-awareness, intellectual honesty, and the ability to navigate ambiguity,” says Hemant Taneja, managing director at General Catalyst Partners, a venture capital firm. That’s what he looks for in companies—and people—he invests in. Alan Braverman, an entrepreneur and angel investor who co-heads the Giant Pixel, a tech startup studio, speaks more bluntly: “What most people consider a safe career path, I consider falling behind.”

You don’t have to be a TaskRabbit (or a VC) to know that the world of work has changed. Technology, globalization, and one long recession—in which nearly one in six Americans reported losing a job, according to Princeton economist Henry Farber—have all disrupted old-fashioned employment. Corporations have downsized, outsourced, and rightsized. They slashed training budgets during the recession, and though that spending is coming back—up 15% in 2013, according to a Deloitte survey—corporate talent development is thought to be a dying art. “As companies see it, the incentives are just so perverse,” says Peter Cappelli, a professor of management at Wharton Business School. “Typically you train someone, and once they become useful, they’re hired away from you.” Meanwhile, the slow march of automation continues: Robots now fly planes, perform surgeries, and in some cases write news. That leaves you, dear worker, in a tight spot—whether or not you’ve got your dream job now, you’ve got to stay relevant and evolve.

That’s not as easy as it once was. The half-life of desirable skills has shortened with the hastening pace of technological change. (A Python programmer now eats the once-hot Java programmer for lunch.) Fabio Rosati, CEO of the online freelancing platform Elance-oDesk, says these dynamics are moving us from the era of employment to one of newfangled “employability.” Professionals, like the 9.3 million who find work on his site, are now being viewed as mobile, independent bundles of skills. In this universe the most adaptable talent rules the day. Increasingly, learning agility is an attribute sought in corporate leadership, says Vicki Swisher, a senior director at Korn Ferry, an executive search firm. What’s more, she says, it’s what employers are looking for in all new hires.

That agility is also mission critical for your personal enterprise (formerly known as your career path). Rather than climb a single corporate ladder like the company man of yore, you’re more likely to spend your career scaling a professional jungle gym, maneuvering between projects, jobs, companies, industries, and locales. By the reckoning of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest job-tenure survey, you’ll pivot every 4.6 years (make that three if you’re a millennial, a demographic that will dominate the workforce in 2015). To do this well requires imagination, initiative, and some guts. Much like a startup, you’re forging your way ahead in a dynamic world where there is no conventional path.

“Get comfortable with being uncomfortable,” advises Mike Abbott, a general partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, who knows as an entrepreneur and as someone whose career zigged to Microsoft, Palm, and Twitter before it zagged to venture capital. In his case, he sought discomfort. “That’s how you learn the most.”

While the ideas of a free-agent nation and personal brand building have been with us for a couple of decades, DIY-career building has gotten a big push from the digital (and old-fashioned sharing) infrastructure that fosters this independence. There’s the rise in communal workspaces like WeWork and educational alternatives like Coursera, which offers college courses online, and General Assembly, which trains workers in the most in-demand tech skills. (As Julka’s case shows, YouTube and Google can also be empowering resources.)

A slew of online platforms has made it simpler to drum up employment, from one-off gigs to full-time jobs. Professionals can peddle their services, whether it be supply-chain management or legal advice, more easily and independently too, through sites like Elance-oDesk and TrustedPeer, which sometimes cater to big companies.

The data are messy on the size and shape of this new, more independent workforce. The BLS, whose classification system dates back to 1948, counted 14.4 million self-employed Americans in April 2014. That’s a far cry from the results of a study commissioned this year by the Freelancers Union and Elance-oDesk, which put the number of freelancers—a broader category that includes temps, part-timers, and moonlighters—at 53 million, or one in three American workers. (A report on freelancers … [more]
Ben_Casnocha  customer_growth  discomforts  Elance-oDesk  free-agents  gig_economy  invest_in_yourself  it's_up_to_me  job_search  large_companies  learning_agility  Managing_Your_Career  non-routine  personal_branding  pitches  preparation  product-market_fit  readiness  Reid_Hoffman  self-assessment  self-awareness  self-employment  Silicon_Valley  skills  slight_edge  special_sauce  start_ups  torchbearers  transparency  TrustedPeer  uncertainty  value_propositions  via:enochko  WeWork 
july 2016 by jerryking
How Not to Be a Networking Leech: Tips for Seeking Professional Advice - The New York Times
SEPT. 26, 2015 | NYT | By MARGARET MORFORD.

(1) Make the meeting convenient. Ask for time frames that would work well, and meet at a place that is convenient for them, even if you have to drive across town.
(2) Buy their coffee or meal.
(3) Go with a prepared list of questions. People whose advice is worth seeking are busy.
(4) Don’t argue about their advice or point out why it wouldn’t work for you. You can ask for clarification by finding out how they would handle a particular concern you have, but don’t go beyond that. You get to decide whether or not to use their advice.
(5) Don’t ask for intellectual property or materials.
(6) Never ask for any written follow-up. It is your job to take good notes during your meeting, not their job to send you bullet points after the meeting. No one should get homework after agreeing to help someone.
(7) Spend time at the end of the meeting finding out what you can do for them.
(8) Always thank them more than once. Follow up with a handwritten note — not an email or a text.
(9) Do not refer others to the same expert.
(10) Ask an expert for free help only once. If the help someone offered you was so valuable that you would like them to provide it again, then pay for it the next time.
(11) As you ask people for help, always consider how you in turn can help others.
best_of  tips  torchbearers  networking  questions  gratitude  serving_others  note_taking  mentoring  advice  handwritten  leeches  brevity 
september 2015 by jerryking
Andy Kessler: Potholes on the Uber Ride to Riches - WSJ
By ANDY KESSLER
Dec. 8, 2014

What should Uber do? Hiring expensive crisis managers is one option. Or do these four things that everyone else eventually figured out. Admit the mistake. Fire someone. Be transparent on the solution. Put guidelines in place to assure customers that this can’t happen again. Uber hasn’t done much of this but it should.... Those who run or work at startups are a different breed. Often computer science majors or engineers, they didn’t get invited to the cool parties. And then when they came up with ideas for products or companies, just about everyone, from parents to friends, told them they were crazy. That’ll never work, they said. Get a job at IBM like your uncle. But instead these entrepreneurs persist, usually failing a time or two. Mr. Kalanick started a peer-to-peer file-sharing company called Scour that went belly up in 2000.

Entrepreneurs pitch their ideas, sometimes to angel investors like dentists and accountants with extra cash, but more often to venture capitalists looking to fund the next big thing. As a venture capitalist, I’ve been pitched thousands of times, and entrepreneurs often peddle market-size projections and future sales predictions that are creative, if not fictional.

Those who win funding wake up every day and ask what they can do to make this thing work. Hubris becomes an asset. Startup CEOs are always saying the goal is to “suck the oxygen out of the room” of their competitors. Success requires a certain bravado. That should be encouraged, but most entrepreneurs have no idea when to turn it off.
hubris  Uber  sharing_economy  ride_sharing  Andy_Kessler  guardrails  start_ups  organizational_culture  entrepreneur  torchbearers  founders 
february 2015 by jerryking
Ken Lombard, on Staying a Student of Business - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: July 6, 2013

When I go and speak to B-school students, the point I try to emphasize is, don’t stop being a student of the game. Don’t think that when you get out of this institution with your degree that now you walk on water. This should make you hungrier than you’ve ever been, because there are people who are coming out with fewer credentials who are very, very hungry....The time I spent working with Howard Schultz at Starbucks [as president of Starbucks Entertainment] was a tremendous learning experience for me in a lot of ways. He was very disciplined in that he was such a thorough and deep thinker, and would really commit to diving in and looking closely at any particular situation, and would turn over every stone. But he would not get stuck on the analysis side, and would have the guts to make the decision, and not accept the status quo....I’m a guy who comes from hard work, and I’m a guy who comes with an approach that says, before I make a tough decision, I want to be on the ground, I want to roll up my sleeves and understand the opportunity. While I understand that analysis tells you what you need to hear in how you need to structure a deal, there’s a difference between deal makers and analysts. Analysts can tell you everything wrong with the deal; the deal maker is going to try to figure out a way to come up with a structure that makes sense.

That doesn’t mean you should ignore what the numbers tell you, but you should try to figure out a structure that mitigates your downside. I try to make sure they understand that deal-making takes some guts. You can’t develop that in a short period. You have to be willing to go out and get the experience, and not think that this is going to happen for you overnight.

You can speed up the learning curve by positioning yourself in a way so people who have the experience want to help you. You have to make it conducive for them to really want to provide you with the information. Then become a sponge. That will help accelerate some of it. Go to someone who has done this before and try to get them to provide you with some guidance, so you’re not reinventing the wheel.
African-Americans  Magic_Johnson  commercial_real_estate  Starbucks  torchbearers  entrepreneur  dealmakers  deal-making  learning_curves  mentoring  life_long_learning  analysis  hard_work  Jason_Isaacs  risk-mitigation  staying_hungry  analysts  assessments_&_evaluations  playing_in_traffic  reinventing_the_wheel 
july 2013 by jerryking
Who gets the money: 'aggressive, hungry and paranoid' - The Globe and Mail
MARK EVANS | Columnist profile
Special to Globe and Mail Update
Published Friday, Mar. 02, 2012

there is financing available for “aggressive, hungry and paranoid” entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The problem is that there aren’t enough of those kinds of entrepreneurs in Canada....“Venture capital is made for people who are very ambitious, people who want to make a dent in the world, eat someone’s lunch, and want to disrupt someone’s business. That attitude, we don’t have enough of in Canada.”
iNovia  venture_capital  vc  entrepreneur  change_agents  disruption  mindsets  paranoia  ambitions  Mark_Evans  aggressive  frugality  pitches  thinking_big  champions  competitiveness  self-confidence  overambitious  staying_hungry  torchbearers 
march 2012 by jerryking
Don't wait for brighter days to go after your goals
April 24, 2009 | Globe & Mail | WALLACE IMMEN

THE FOLLOW-THROUGH FACTOR

It's the people who challenge perceptions and find ways around barriers who will get ahead in a tough economy, job coach says
Wallace_Immen  economic_downturn  Managing_Your_Career  adversity  following_up  torchbearers 
april 2009 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: And from the Russian judge...
More good stuff from Seth Godin. Sticking to it to get a task
done! When VC firms look for entrepreneurs on whom to risk their money,
they aren't searching for a great idea, or even great credentials. No,
what they're searching for is this: the certainty that the person who
brings them a business idea is going to carry the torch for that idea as
long as it takes, that the idea will get passed on, and that the
business will make it across the finish line-- torchbearers.
Torchbearers are people with that rare skill, the ability to dig deep
when the need arises -- to get past the short-term pain and to pull off
an act that few would have believed possible.
Seth_Godin  perseverance  indispensable  leadership  torchbearers  entrepreneur  venture_capital  vc  grit  certainty  character_traits  champions  overambitious 
september 2007 by jerryking

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