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jerryking : tough_love   18

Susan Rice Recounts Making Policy at the Highest Levels
Oct. 10, 2019 | The New York Times | By Abby D. Phillip.

TOUGH LOVE
My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For
By Susan Rice
Illustrated. 531 pp. Simon & Schuster. $30.

Tough Love is Susan Rice's memoir. Susan Rice doesn't allow herself to be defined by the events of September 2012 in Benghazi, Libya, after which she was demonized by the right-wingers in the U.S. ....Rice’s personal story is rooted partly in slavery in America and partly in economic migration to the United States.....Rice benefitted from privilege that gave her access to well-heeled private schooling, elite advanced degrees (i.e. Stanford University, and later was a Rhodes scholar at Oxford) and membership in the even more elite Washington society. Rice’s unflagging work ethic and drive stems from her family's belief that, "The only constraints we faced were our own ambition, effort and skill.” ......Early in her career at the National Security Council, Rice navigated some of the most difficult foreign policy challenges the country has faced in recent history, and in a pattern that continued into the Obama years her fate seemed constantly intertwined with Africa. The 1994 genocide in Rwanda provided an object lesson in the moral failures of inaction. Later, she dealt with another major crisis that would reverberate later in her career. The 1998 Nairobi embassy and Dar es Salaam embassy bombings.
Rice is clinical in her retelling of the foreign policy decisions of the Clinton and Obama administrations. And there is no attempt to neatly sew together an overarching narrative about her approach to foreign policy challenges based on her years of experience in government. In fact, that may be the lesson of her tale of “tough love.” Public policy, Rice argues, is pragmatic, and sometimes a little dark: “We did fail, we will fail. Our aim must be to minimize the frequency and the price of failure.”.....Rice's “assertiveness and relentlessness” has cost her reputation within the State Department as a difficult boss. Rice has considered--and ruled out--pursuit of elected office, preferring the comfort of policy-focused, behind-the-scenes roles.
African-Americans  APNSA  assertiveness  Benghazi  books  book_reviews  cost_of_inaction  failure  memoirs  NSC  Obama  policymaking  public_policy  relentlessness  Rhodes  Stanford  Susan_Rice  tough_love  U.S.foreign_policy  U.S._State_Department  women  work_ethic 
october 2019 by jerryking
Opinion | My Father Wanted to Prove America Wrong About Race - The New York Times
By Susan E. Rice
Ms. Rice, a contributing opinion writer, is the author of the forthcoming memoir, “Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For,” from which this essay is adapted.
African-Americans  books  Emmett_Rice  memoirs  Susan_Rice  tough_love 
october 2019 by jerryking
‘I Wish You Bad Luck,’ He Said With Good Intentions
Dec. 28, 2017 | WSJ | By Bob Greene.

In Spring 2017, Chief Justice John Roberts delivered a commencement address to his son's grade 9 graduation ceremony that offered a universal lesson about the value to be found in generosity of spirit. Roberts prepared the advice offered in his speech specifically for the commencement address, as he set out to reflect upon “some of the harsh realities that everyone will face in the course of a full life,” and how to anticipate them and learn from them....His speech was structured in pairs.....He told his audience that commencement speakers will typically “wish you good luck and extend good wishes to you. I will not do that, and I’ll tell you why.

“From time to time in the years to come, I hope you will be treated unfairly, so that you will come to know the value of justice.

“I hope that you will suffer betrayal, because that will teach you the importance of loyalty.

“Sorry to say, but I hope you will be lonely from time to time so that you don’t take friends for granted.

“I wish you bad luck, again, from time to time so that you will be conscious of the role of chance in life, and understand that your success is not completely deserved and that the failure of others is not completely deserved either.

“And when you lose, as you will from time to time, I hope every now and then your opponent will gloat over your failure. It is a way for you to understand the importance of sportsmanship.

“I hope you’ll be ignored so that you know the importance of listening to others, and I hope you will have just enough pain to learn compassion.

“Whether I wish these things or not, they’re going to happen. And whether you benefit from them or not will depend upon your ability to see the message in your misfortunes.”

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Also,......“Once a week, you should write a note to someone. Not an email. A note on a piece of paper. It will take you exactly 10 minutes.” Then, Roberts urged, put the note in an envelope and send it off the old way: via the mail.

The handwritten note, he said, might express appreciation for someone who has helped you out or treated you with kindness, and who may not know how grateful you are.........here’s a toast to bad luck, and to its hidden gifts. First, though, the corner mailbox awaits. Gratitude is priceless, but conveying it costs no more than a postage stamp.
advice  betrayals  chance  commencement  failure  friendships  gratitude  handwritten  John_Roberts  judges  justice  life_skills  loyalty  luck  pairs  speeches  sportsmanship  U.S._Supreme_Court  values  compassion  listening  inspiration  teachable_moments  counterintuitive  tough_love  good_intentions 
may 2019 by jerryking
Bridgewater Founder Ray Dalio’s Next Investment
Oct. 13, 2017 | WSJ | By Alexandra Wolfe.

Ray Dalio, founder of Bridgewater Associates, believes in radical truthfulness. He lives by a mélange of maxims about being transparent and embracing reality. “Don’t filter.” “Don’t treat all opinions as equally valuable.” “Don’t ‘pick your battles.’ Fight them all.”

New book, “Principles: Life and Work,” a new 592-page tome about how to succeed. Truth is “the essential foundation for producing good outcomes.” He says it’s also the foundation on which he built Bridgewater, which manages $160 billion.
Ray_Dalio  Bridgewater  hedge_funds  values  truth-telling  transparency  tough_love  books 
october 2017 by jerryking
Bark with bite
January 30, 2012 | FT | By John Quelch.

Academics succeed if their names are linked to one important idea that outlives them. Professor Theodore Levitt’s name is linked to many. The first was a blockbuster. “Marketing myopia” was published by Harvard Business Review (HBR) in 1960, one year after Harvard Business School plucked Prof Levitt, the son of a German immigrant cobbler, from the University of North Dakota.

The article famously asked: “What business are you in?” It critiqued railroads for “letting their customers get away from them because they assumed themselves to be in the railroad business rather than the transportation business”. They were product-orientated rather than market-orientated....the importance of tangible evidence to reassure customers choosing among suppliers of intangible services (the impressive bank building, the authoritative logo)....I gave him a wide berth until it was time for feedback on my thesis proposal after three months of hard labour. The meeting lasted five minutes, barely long enough for Prof Levitt, whose mentoring style was more tough love than hand-holding, to dismiss me with: “Throw this out, start again and come back in a week with something important!” Fortunately, I did.

Prof Levitt’s advice was always to work on important problems that are important to important people in important companies. It spurred me to get out into the field, talk to business people, write case studies and understand the messy complexity of the world, rather than work behind my desk on mathematical models based on unrealistic assumptions.
advice  discernment  feedback  hand-holding  HBR  HBS  John_Quelch  marketing  market-orientated  messiness  myopic  primary_field_research  product-orientated  reminiscing  sophisticated  Theodore_Levitt  tough_love  worthiness  worthwhile_problems 
december 2013 by jerryking
Between Barack Obama and the Press - Robert Gibbs - Profile - NYTimes.com
By MARK LEIBOVICH
Published: December 17, 2008

Gibbs is not shy about nagging Obama or inflicting tough-love feedback. Early in the campaign, Obama was averse to making courtesy calls to local officials. He was not great about “calling the former state rep in Wapello County for the fourth time,” Plouffe said. So Gibbs took it upon himself to make sure a certain number of calls got done every day. He could be very insistent. “You said you were going to do 35 calls today,” Gibbs would tell Obama, according to Plouffe. “Eventually he just did them.”
Obama  Robert_Gibbs  journalists  Communicating_&_Connecting  Campaign_2008  retail_politics  tough_love 
september 2013 by jerryking
Africa Needs Tough Love - WSJ.com
July 15, 2003 | WJS By GEORGE B.N. AYITTEY.

President Bush correctly recognized that what Africa needs is straight talk, tough love. Short of recolonization, there's only so much he can do to help unless Africa's leadership is willing to get serious about tackling its innumerable woes.
Africa  tough_love  foreign_aid  failed_states  Robert_Mugabe  truth-telling  Zimbabwe  capital_flight  sub-Saharan_Africa  leaders  leadership 
august 2012 by jerryking
Wise Words from a Judge in New Zealand - for Young People and Adults - Michael Sampson on Collaboration
February 13, 2012

"Northland College (NZ) principal John Tapene has offered the following words from a judge who regularly deals with youth.

"Always we hear the cry from teenagers 'What can we do, where can we go?'
... My answer is, "Go home, mow the lawn, wash the windows, learn to cook, build a raft, get a job, visit the sick, study your lessons, and after you've finished, read a book."

"Your town does not owe you recreational facilities and your parents do not owe you fun. The world does not owe you a living, you owe the world something. You owe it your time, energy and talent so that no one will be at war, in poverty or sick and lonely again."

"In other words, grow up, stop being a cry baby, get out of your dream world and develop a backbone, not a wishbone. Start behaving like a responsible person. You are important and you are needed. It's too late to sit around and wait for somebody to do something someday. Someday is now and that somebody is you...""
New_Zealand  inspiration  self-pity  tough_love  young_people 
february 2012 by jerryking
Why Should Anyone be Led by You
September-October 2000| HBR | by Robert Goffee and Gareth Jones
leadership  HBR  myths  tough_love  tough-mindedness  empathy  mindsets 
november 2011 by jerryking
U.S. needs to try harder on the global stage - The Globe and Mail
CHRYSTIA FREELAND | Columnist profile
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Oct. 20, 2011

I had breakfast this week with Jeffrey Immelt, chief executive officer of GE, and the main dish on the menu was tough love. In an Americans can still win in the global economy – but that they need to fight harder...The competition Mr. Immelt and Ms. Clinton want U.S. companies to win is the battle for dominance in the global marketplace and for the chequebook of the growing global middle class....As a cautionary counterexample, he cited Japan. “When I was a young guy, when I first started with GE, Jack Welch sent us all to Japan because in those days Japan was gonna crush us,” he said. “And we learned a lot about Japan when we were there. But over the subsequent 30 years, the Japanese companies all fell behind. And the reason why they fell behind is because they didn’t globalize. They didn’t have to go out and sing for their dinner in every corner of the world. That’s not the case with GE. It’s not the case with other American multinationals.”...Smart businesses have figured out how to globalize. We don’t yet know if countries can do the same.
globalization  GE  Jeffrey_Immelt  Chrystia_Freeland  multinationals  exporting  national_identity  tough_love  global_economy 
october 2011 by jerryking
Tough-mindedness - Gabor's Positive Thoughts
William James, a great teacher of psychology & philosophy
at Harvard during the early yrs. of the 20th century, made the useful
distinction between being tough-minded vs. tender-minded. The terms have
nothing to do with levels of ethical conduct; the toughness referred to
is toughness of the intellectual apparatus, toughness of the spirit,
not toughness of the heart. It is the attitude & the qualities &
the training that enable one to seize on facts & make these facts a
basis for intelligent, courageous action. The tough-minded have a zest
for tackling hard problems. They dare to grapple with the unfamiliar
& wrest useful truth from stubborn new facts. They are not dismayed
by change. Above all, the tough-minded do not wall themselves in
comfortable illusions. They do not rely on the easy precepts of
tradition or on mere conformity to regulations. They know that the
answers are not in the book.
tough_love  tough-mindedness  attitudes  conformity  mindsets  decision_making  ambiguities  change  illusions  arduous 
april 2011 by jerryking
The Arduous Community - NYTimes.com
December 20, 2010 | NYT | By DAVID BROOKS.
Erica Brown leads Torah study groups and teaches adult education classes
in Jewish thought....Brown has what many people are looking for these
days. In the first place, she has conviction. For her, Judaism isn’t a
punch line or a source of neuroticism; it’s a path to self-confident and
superior living....In her classes and groups, she tries to create
arduous countercultural communities. “We live in a relativistic
culture,” she told me. Many people have no firm categories to organize
their thinking. They find it hard to give a straight yes or no answer to
tough moral questions. When they go in search of answers, they
generally find people who offer them comfort and ways to ease their
anxiety.

Brown tries to do the opposite. Jewish learning, she says, isn’t about
achieving tranquility. It’s about the struggle. “I try to make people
uncomfortable.”
Judaism  education  tough_love  David_Brooks  community_builders  convictions  tough-mindedness  rigour  discomforts  struggles  self-confidence  candour  arduous  counterculture 
december 2010 by jerryking

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