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jerryking : traffic_congestion   37

Cake shop management cannot suffice for a modern economy.
Feb 28, 2019 | Kaieteur News | Columnists, Peeping Tom.

Cake shop management cannot suffice for a modern economy.

The style of governance since political Independence has not been conducive to development. It is ill-suited for modernization. Given the expansive nature of relations and issues which governments have to address, there is a need for greater devolution of power. Centralized government can no longer cope with the multiple, overlapping and multilayered aspects of governance.......Guyana, however, is going in the opposite direction. The more modern the bureaucracy, the more swollen and overstaffed it becomes. The more complex government becomes, the more centralized is decision-making. The greater demands on resources, the bigger the bureaucracy.
The public bureaucracy is now a cancer. It is sucking the life out of public administration. Merely keeping this inefficient and revenue-guzzling monstrosity alive is costing taxpayers in excess of 500 million dollars per day. This is wanton wastage. That money could have been put to help boost private sector development to create jobs for the thousands of young people who are unemployed. The more the government implements technology, the more inefficient it becomes. It is all part of what is known as cake shop management........Guyana is going to continue to be left behind the rest of the world. It has seen Guyana retrogress and we will always be in a fire fighting mode rather than ensuring forward thinking and planning. A country today simply cannot be run like a cake shop. The world is too modern, and too many things are taking place to allow for such a style of governance. Once the policy is made by the government, the mechanics should be left to lower level officials who should be held accountable for ensuring its implementation and who should be held responsible for any failures........What is required is for faster decision-making so as to allow for the multitasking.........Plantain chips and breadfruit chips and other small businesses cannot make the economy grow. It cannot generate the massive jobs needed to impact on unemployment. It will not lift large numbers out of poverty. This is catch-hand approach to helping poor people.
Cake shop management cannot run a modern economy. Never has; never will.
bureaucracies  centralization  complexity  decision_making  devolution  Guyana  inefficiencies  modernization  policymaking  public_sector  public_servants  technology  traffic_congestion  forward-thinking  multitasking  decentralization  digital_economy  governance  knowledge_economy  centralized_control  implementation  unsophisticated 
march 2019 by jerryking
Singapore experiments with smart government
January 22, 2018 | FT | by John Thornhill.

Singapore has a reputation as a free-trading entrepôt, beloved of buccaneering Brexiters. ....But stiff new challenges confront Singapore, just as they do all other countries, in the face of the latest technological upheavals. Is the smart nation, as it likes to style itself, smart enough to engineer another reboot?.....Singapore is becoming a prime test bed for how developed nations can best manage the potentially disruptive forces unleashed by powerful new technologies, such as advanced robotics and artificial intelligence...Naturally, Singapore’s technocratic government is well aware of those challenges and is already rethinking policy and practice. True to its heritage, it is pursuing a hybrid approach, mixing free market principles and state activism.

Rather than passively reacting to the technological challenges, the island state is actively embracing them....“The real skill of Singapore has been to reverse engineer the needs of industry and to supply them in a much more cost-effective way than simply writing a cheque,” says Rob Bier, managing partner of Trellis Asia, which advises high-growth start-ups...To take one example, the country has become an enthusiastic promoter of autonomous vehicles. The government has created one of the most permissive regulatory regimes in the world to test driverless cars.....GovTech’s aim is to help offer seamless, convenient public services for all users, creating a truly digital society, economy and government. To that end, the government is acting as a public sector platform, creating a secure and accessible open-data infrastructure for its citizens and companies. For example, with users’ permission, Singapore’s national identity database can be accessed by eight commercial banks to verify customers with minimal fuss. A public health service app now allows parents to keep check of their children’s vaccinations.

By running with the technological wolves, Singapore is clearly hoping to tame the pack.
Singapore  autonomous_vehicles  dislocations  traffic_congestion  aging  smart_government  disruption  robotics  automation  artificial_intelligence  test_beds  reboot  city_states  experimentation  forward-thinking  open-data  privacy  reverse_engineering 
january 2018 by jerryking
Globe editorial: A little transit miracle grows on King Street - The Globe and Mail
'Make no little plans," goes architect Daniel Burnman's oft quoted line. "They have no magic to stir men's blood."

A three-kilometre stretch of King Street, which runs through the heart of downtown and is home to the busiest streetcar route in the city, has been redesigned to give public transit priority. For decades, streetcars have been slowed to a walking pace at rush hour, held up by a crush of cars. As of a week ago, however, cars are being severely restricted on King, and must turn right off of the newly transit-centric street at every intersection. Under the one-year pilot project, only streetcars can use the downtown stretch of King as a thoroughfare.

The aim is to greatly speed up the King streetcar, which carries 65,000 passengers a day. That's more people than any above-ground transit route in the city, roughly as many as the 500 buses of the provincial GO Transit's entire suburban bus system, and more than the Toronto Transit Commission's Sheppard subway. (The Sheppard line was one of those Big Plans that never made sense based on ridership or economics, but which got built anyhow because it had the magic to stir the blood of well-connected politicians.)

The cost of this big change on one of the busiest transit routes in the city? Small. Instead of being measured in billions of dollars and decades of construction, it involved the exorbitant expense of trucking in a few concrete barriers, changing a handful of road signs and buying some yellow paint. Construction period? Counted in days. This in a city used to endlessly debating big, transformative transit solutions that, if they could get funded, would arrive around the time one of Jagmeet Singh's grandchildren is elected prime minister.

For example, look at the so-called Downtown Relief Line. It's a badly needed subway expansion that has been under consideration for more than half a century. Politicians, who have repeatedly shelved the DRL because it will do a better job of serving passengers than voters, have recently rediscovered it, and feasibility studies are once again moving forward. But even under the most optimistic timetable – and assuming Toronto, Queen's Park and Ottawa find the money to pay for it – it's still at least a decade and a half away from completion.

Meanwhile, between a Friday night and a Monday morning, King Street was transformed from a run-of-the-mill road into the country's newest public transit thru-way.

But beyond King Street, politicians and promoters continue searching for the biggest of big transit ideas for the GTA. For example, the provincial Liberals continue to push ahead with planning a $21-billion (before cost overruns) high-speed rail line between Toronto and Windsor. And the Greater Toronto Airports Authority, the quango that runs Pearson International Airport, is pushing the idea of making itself the region's second public-transit hub, a move it estimates will cost $11.2-billion. The concept, however questionable its value to most GTA commuters, aims to excite the new Canada Infrastructure Bank, while pleasing 905-region voters and the politicians who woo them.

The challenge is that much of the GTA is too low density to support high-intensity public transit. The two big exceptions are routes running from the periphery to the compact employment area of downtown Toronto, and transit within the central parts of Toronto, which are dense enough to allow many people to live car-free.
Toronto  commuting  traffic_congestion  pilot_programs  TTC  transit  editorials  DRL  GTA  density  HSR  GTAA  hubs  Pearson_International  YYZ  King_Street  Queen’s_Park 
november 2017 by jerryking
Toronto aims to use data for traffic insight - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE - URBAN TRANSPORTATION REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 02, 2015
Toronto  data  transportation  hackathons  analytics  traffic_congestion  John_Tory  GPS  location_based_services  LBMA 
october 2015 by jerryking
Public transit and the rush-hour commute now federal issues - The Globe and Mail
CAMPBELL CLARK
Public transit and the rush-hour commute now federal issues
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 27 2015
transit  GTA  transportation  Milton  traffic_congestion  infrastructure  GO  public_transit  rush-hour  commuting 
april 2015 by jerryking
Toronto to use big data to help reduce traffic congestion - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 07 2015 | The Globe and Mail | OLIVER MOORE - URBAN TRANSPORTATION REPORTER

Toronto is creating a “big data” traffic team as the city tries to manage congestion better by learning what is actually happening on its streets.....The push is a start toward filling that vacuum of information. The city has released a job posting for someone to lead the data unit and will spend the rest of the year deciding what they want to learn. A “hackathon” in September will let people come in, look at the available data and see what they can do with it.

Big data has become a buzz phrase in traffic circles as smartphones and GPS units make it easier to track people’s movements. But in most places, the promise looms larger than the reality. Many cities are still trying to figure out how to turn the flood of data into useful information.
massive_data_sets  traffic_congestion  Toronto  John_Tory  transportation  analytics  data  information_vacuum 
april 2015 by jerryking
Street savvy: A look at how Toronto’s traffic nerve centre really manages our roads - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Feb. 27 2015,

As drivers wrestle with congestion on roads across Toronto, staff at the city’s Traffic Management Centre swing into action when anything goes wrong. Far from the public gaze, they dispatch response teams, warn drivers and, in some cases, fiddle with traffic signals to manage the flow better.

This real-time effort to monitor and relieve Toronto’s increasingly clogged streets is run by a small team in a nondescript Don Mills office building.
traffic_congestion  Toronto  surveillance  real-time  digital_savvy 
march 2015 by jerryking
2014’s lessons for leaders: Don’t make assumptions, do make hard decisions - The Globe and Mail
BOB RAE
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 26 2014,

Life has a way of lifting you by the lapels and giving you a good shake. Stuff happens, and when it does, it can throw all the steady paths predicted by pundits, pollsters and economic forecasters into the trash heap....Canadians are fixated on who the winners and losers of the "where will oil prices head" game ...but we need to lift our heads a bit. Russia’s falling ruble and the debt crisis of its elites and their companies have rightly grabbed headlines. But a couple of countries, notably Nigeria and Venezuela, are now in political crisis, and their very stability is at risk in the days ahead.

One of the implications of the 2008 world economic crisis is that regional and world institutions have much less room to manoeuvre and help sort things out. it will be harder for those agencies (EU, IMF) to do as much as is required. Stability doesn’t come cheap....a healthy dose of reality and skepticism is always a good idea. In a useful piece of advice, Rudyard Kipling reminded us that triumph and disaster are both imposters. People draw too many conclusions from current trends. They fail to understand that those trends can change. And that above all, they forget that events can get in the way....One clear lesson is for leaders everywhere to learn the importance of listening and engagement. The path to resolution of even the thorniest of problems...involves less rhetoric and bluster and a greater capacity to understand underlying interests and grievances. ... Engagement should never mean appeasement.
Bob_Rae  pundits  decision_making  leaders  unintended_consequences  predictions  WWI  humility  Toronto  traffic_congestion  crisis  instability  listening  engagement  unpredictability  Rudyard_Kipling  petro-politics  imposters  short-sightedness  amnesia_bias  interests  grievances  appeasement  hard_choices 
december 2014 by jerryking
Tory unveils six-point plan for easing Toronto’s gridlock - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE - URBAN TRANSPORTATION REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Dec. 04 2014
John_Tory  Toronto  traffic_congestion 
december 2014 by jerryking
CBC.ca | Metro Morning | TTC delays
Thursday November 6, 2014
TTC delays
"Late for work, the subway's delayed." That's become a common refrain in this city. But yesterday was particularly bad, with signal problems causing delays on both major lines. Matt talked to transit advocate Steve Munro about what's behind those problems and whether they'll be fixed any time soon.
TTC  transit  traffic_congestion 
november 2014 by jerryking
Toronto's summertime roadwork fest the start of a noisier – but sounder – future - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 18 2014

Bloor Street West is getting new sidewalks and asphalt. Dundas and Spadina is being dug up for track and water-main work. Construction fencing is going in and heavy equipment setting up on Eglinton Avenue for the Crosstown light-rail transit project. Then, of course, there is the Gardiner Expressway, now in the midst of a massive rehabilitation that often slows traffic to a crawl even more snail-like than usual. With contractors hurrying to finish projects for next year’s Pan American Games as well, it is feeling like the worst construction season in years.
Eglinton_Crosstown  summertime  Toronto  infrastructure  transit  TTC  congestion  transportation  Metrolinx  traffic_congestion 
july 2014 by jerryking
Google buys Waze: Street plan
Jun 15th 2013 | | The Economist

The modern map is almost a living thing. Its habitat is the personal computer or (increasingly) the smartphone. It can carry layer upon layer of data, from traffic conditions and public-transport routes to reviews of local restaurants and indoor plans of shops, museums and airports. And as the world changes, the map adapts....In maps Google is already far ahead of both its rivals, Facebook and Apple. It has spent huge sums making the physical world as searchable as the digital realm, sending cars and aeroplanes to gather images and data from all over the planet. Recently Google showed off improvements to its maps. Among other things, they will be more personal: people can add their own landmarks (a favourite restaurant or museum, say), and similar or related places will be highlighted....Smartphones on which Waze’s app is open are tracked automatically. They contribute to an ever-changing map that shows drivers the best way to beat the traffic on the way to work or home. Drivers can also choose to report jams, as well as accidents, roadworks, speed traps and petrol prices. Thousands have also edited Waze’s maps. Waze users’ data, if eventually built into Google’s maps, should give a timelier, fuller picture of conditions on the roads.
mapping  Google  M&A  Waze  mergers_&_acquisitions  cyberphysical  Israeli  wayfinding  physical_world  indoors  traffic_congestion 
june 2013 by jerryking
Traffic accidents: predict, then prevent
March 19, 2013 | G&M | NICK ROCKEL.
Edmonton cut crash deaths and injuries by nearly 40 per cent by crunching data ranging from road design to license plates....Beyond looking for existing patterns to improve traffic safety, OTS has started peering into the future, with the use of predictive analytics.

Last year, its analytics team collaborated with the University of Alberta's departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, to build a computer model that shows, based on snow conditions, when to expect a higher number of collisions.

This weather model predicts collision trends seven days in advance with about 90-per-cent accuracy, Mr. Shimko says. As conditions turn hazardous, the city's Traffic Management Centre can use this information as part of its digital sign messaging.

As well, OTS works with the Edmonton Police Service on several initiatives to reduce speeding and other traffic violations.

Last year it began collecting and analyzing data on every licence plate detected via intersection safety devices, photo speed enforcement and other automated means, and giving high-risk drivers' plates to the police. "Then the police can target their resources based on those high-risk drivers," who typically have more injury collisions, Mr. Shimko says. "Some of the initial results are quite promising."

Special to The
Edmonton  predictive_analytics  analytics  data  prevention  engineering  data_driven  massive_data_sets  weather  traffic_congestion  OTS  collisions 
march 2013 by jerryking
Car Companies Tap Data Trove - WSJ.com
March 7, 2013 | WSJ| By IAN SHERR And MIKE RAMSEY.
Drive Into the Future
Your car knows a lot about you. And it's talking....Automakers are exploring ways to use information form cars on the road to improve the driving experience, car design, fuel efficiency and financing, among other things...Improving safety, however, isn't the only way car companies can use that data. Mr. Koslowski estimates that by 2016, up to a third of all interactions between car companies and their customers will happen in the vehicle. Car companies, for example, could collect and analyze data about how customers use leased vehicles, and based on that information suggest other cars a driver might like around the time his or her lease is expiring, he says.

"They can notice all the vehicle seat belts are occupied and they can say, hey, maybe you want a family vehicle," Mr. Koslowski says....In the coming years, auto makers like Ford, Audi AG NSU.XE +0.34% and others see even more potential in big data. They envision taking information from customers' typical driving patterns, schedules and movements on the road to recommend routes the drivers might feel more comfortable with, either because they prefer city streets to freeways or don't respond well to bumper-to-bumper traffic.
massive_data_sets  automotive_industry  data  pattern_recognition  traffic_congestion  data_driven  product_recalls  social_media  telematics  customer_experience  UX 
march 2013 by jerryking
Using 'Big Data' to Fill Potholes and End Traffic Jams - WSJ.com
June 11, 2012 | WSJ | By SHIRA OVIDE

Tapping 'Big Data' to Fill Potholes
Start-Ups Help States and Municipalities Track Effects of Car Speeds, Other Variables on Traffic.

The New Jersey center offers a glimpse at the power of "big data," a term for techniques to gather reams of computerized information points, analyze them and spit out patterns, often in easy-to-understand visuals like maps or charts. While some industries have used big-data methods for years, what's new is the massive scale of data being generated now thanks to the proliferation of networked gadgets like mobile phones and the growing power of computers to store and make sense of data quickly and more cheaply.
municipalities  massive_data_sets  New_Jersey  sensors  traffic_congestion 
june 2012 by jerryking
Toronto - The Globe and Mail
May. 28, 2012 | Globe and Mail | ADRIAN MORROW.
Toronto  urban  traffic_congestion 
may 2012 by jerryking
CPCS Transcom helps tame traffic chaos in Lagos - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 27, 2011 | G & M | GEOFFREY YORK. If any company can
handle the unpredictability of Lagos, it would be CPCS Transcom Ltd.,
an Ottawa-based company that serves as lead adviser to the project. The
Canadian company has quietly emerged as one of the trouble-shooters of
Africa’s economic revival. It has experience in 40 African countries,
primarily as a consultant in infrastructure development, and Africa
accounts for about half of its worldwide business....Peter Kieran, grew
up in Toronto and graduated from U of T, got his first African
experience in 1970 on a summer job in Tanzania while he was an MBA
student at HBS. Inspired by his Tanzania experience, he set up a
consulting company to work in developing countries. In 1996, he
purchased CPCS International, which had originally been established by
Canadian Pacific, and merged it with their own company, Hickling
Transcom. The company has specialized in railways and ports, seeking to
make them more commercial and privately financed.
Africa  Geoffrey_York  Nigeria  Lagos  transit  canadian  management_consulting  traffic_congestion  developing_countries 
may 2011 by jerryking
Needed: national urban strategy - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 29, 2011|G&M|CAROL WILDING & MERV HILLIER.
Infrastructure has not kept pace with the growth of our cities. Our
report, Toronto as a Global City, documents what any commuter in rush
hour can tell you. Canada’s transportation systems have fallen well
behind those of the rest of the world. Among 23 global cities, 3 of the
bottom 5 positions in the transportation ranking are Canadian (Toronto,
Vancouver & Halifax). The avg. commuter round trip ranges from 67 to
80 minutes. Toronto again is last, longer than NYC, London and LA.
Canada has to do better. If employees and goods can’t get to their
destination on time, productivity will suffer. The quality and
availability of infrastructure directly affect business locations and
operations. In the GTA, congestion now costs the economy $6-B annually;
that will rise to $15-B annually by 2031 without sufficient levels of
investment. Across the country, the cost of underinvestment in just our
transportation infrastructure is even higher.
Toronto  urban  strategy  congestion  commuting  rush-hour  cities  infrastructure  underinvestments  traffic_congestion 
april 2011 by jerryking
Toronto's worst intersection?
Jun. 14, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | John Lorinc.
Toronto  John_Lorinc  bicycles  traffic_congestion 
june 2010 by jerryking
Toronto congestion costs Canada $3.3-billion: OECD
Nov. 19, 2009 | The Globe and Mail | by Brodie Fenlon. More
should be done to capitalize on immigrants' international networks in
order to expand Canada's global trade. Cities outside Toronto need to
increase investment in affordable and rental housing that serves
newcomers.
OECD  Toronto  congestion  transit  transportation  planning  immigrants  traffic_congestion 
december 2009 by jerryking
Stuck in traffic? Phone may soon help you escape - The Globe and Mail
Monday, Jan. 15, 2007 | Globe & Mail pg. A12 | by JEFF
GRAY. "In the surprisingly near future, your cellphone may be able to
warn you about a traffic jam ahead, predict precisely how long your
commute home will take, or even recommend an alternative route."
computers essentially take a look at the torrent of data this "pinging"
pours in, using a "triangulation" process based on the time-delay
between pings. Its system figures out which cellphones are moving, where
they are, and how fast they are going. The data are then streamed into a
traffic map and produce precise information on speeds and estimated
travel times not just on major expressways, but on every single road in
cellphone range.
Jeff_Gray  mobile_phones  triangulation  privacy  congestion  competingonanalytics  data_mining  massive_data_sets  location_based_services  metadata  traffic_congestion 
october 2009 by jerryking

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