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Martin Kilson, Scholar and Racial Pathbreaker at Harvard, Dies at 88
April 30, 2019 | The New York Times | By Richard Sandomir.

Martin Kilson, a leftist scholar, fierce debater and follower of W. E. B. Du Bois who became the first tenured African-American professor at Harvard, died on April 24 in Lincoln, Mass. He was 88.....Professor Kilson was a prolific writer, an expert on ethnic politics in Africa and the United States, and a mentor to generations of students, among them the writer, teacher and philosopher Cornel West......Professor Kilson, an avowed integrationist, was already teaching courses in African politics in the 1960s when black students were starting to assert themselves on predominantly white campuses like Harvard.......Professor Kilson was a faculty sponsor of the Harvard-Radcliffe Association of African and Afro-American Students. But after the university’s Afro-American studies department was established in 1969, he became disenchanted with its governance, criticizing it as lacking academic rigor and maintaining that it had become an enclave for radical black students.

“Black solidarity forces are distinctly anti-intellectual and anti-achievement in orientation,” he wrote in a provocative essay about Harvard in The New York Times Magazine in 1973. “They indulge in the ‘black magic’ of nationalism, believing that miracles are possible if Negroes display fidelity to black nationalism or separatism and its anti-white attitudes, rituals and symbols.”....Kilson argued that the radical politics of separatists was an academic dead end.....“It took extraordinary courage in 1969 to challenge Black Panther and black power rhetoric,” the Rev. Eugene Rivers III, a former student of Professor Kilson’s, said in a telephone interview. “And he was right.”......Professor Kilson encountered Du Bois, the pioneering urban sociologist who was a founder of the N.A.A.C.P., as a freshman at Lincoln University, a HBCU....Du Bois remained an influence throughout Professor Kilson’s career....Harvard hired him as a lecturer in government in 1962. He was named an assistant professor two years later and granted tenure in 1968.

“He took a lot of pride in that accomplishment,” his daughter Hannah Kilson said in a telephone interview....Kilson used that sharp pen in 2002 when he challenged Randall L. Kennedy, a distinguished African-American professor at Harvard Law School, over the title of Professor Kennedy’s book “Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word.”
academic_rigor  African-Americans  Black_Panthers  black_nationalism  black_power  black_separatism  black_studies  Cornel_West  Eugene_Rivers  Harvard  Henry_Louis_Gates  integration  left-wing  obituaries  PhDs  scholars  trailblazers  W.E.B._Du_Bois  wishful_thinking 
may 2019 by jerryking
"Boss: The Black Experience in Business" Explores the History of African American Entrepreneurship Tuesday, April 23 on PBS
Apr 23, 2019 | WNET |

Tying together the past and the present, Boss: The Black Experience in Business explores the inspiring stories of trailblazing African American entrepreneurs and the significant contributions of contemporary business leaders. Stories featured in the film include those of entrepreneur Madam C.J. Walker, publisher John H. Johnson, Motown CEO Berry Gordy, and business pioneer and philanthropist Reginald F. Lewis, among others. The film features new interviews with Vernon Jordan, senior managing director of Lazard, Freres & Co. LLC.; Cathy Hughes, CEO and founder of Urban One; Ursula Burns, former CEO of Xerox and chairman of VEON; Ken Frazier, chairman, president and CEO of Merck & Co., Inc.; Richelieu Dennis, founder, CEO and executive chairman of Sundial Brands; Robert F. Smith, chairman and CEO of Vista Equity Managing Partners, LLC; Earl "Butch" Graves, Jr., CEO of Black Enterprise; and John Rogers, CEO and founder of Ariel Investments.

As a capitalist system emerged in the United States, African Americans found ways to establish profitable businesses in numerous industries, including financial services, retail, beauty, music and media.
African-Americans  Berry_Gordy  C.J.Walker  CEOs  documentaries  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  filmmakers  founders  historians  history  inspiration  Kenneth_Frazier  Lazard  Merck  moguls  PBS  Reginald_Lewis  Robert_Smith  storytelling  trailblazers  Vernon_Jordan 
april 2019 by jerryking
Andrew Marshall, Pentagon’s Threat Expert, Dies at 97 - The New York Times
By Julian E. Barnes
March 26, 2019

Andrew Marshall, a Pentagon strategist who helped shape U.S. military thinking on the Soviet Union, China and other global competitors for more than four decades, has died. He was 97. Mr. Marshall, as director of the Office of Net Assessment, was the secretive futurist of the Pentagon, a long-range thinker who prodded and inspired secretaries of defense and high-level policymakers.......Marshall was revered in the DoD as a mysterious Yoda-like figure who embodied an exceptionally long institutional memory.......... Marshall's view of China as a potential strategic adversary, an idea now at the heart of national defense strategy....Through his many hires and Pentagon grants..... Mr. Marshall trained a coterie of experts and strategists in Washington and beyond.....he cultivated thinking that looked beyond the nation’s immediate problems and sought to press military leaders to approach long-term challenges differently......His gift was the framing of the question, the discovery of the critical question..... always picking the least studied and most strategically significant subjects....Marshall’s career as a strategic thinker began in 1949 at the RAND Corporation, where his theory of competitive strategies took root. Borrowing from business school theories of how corporations compete against each other, Mr. Marshall argued that nations are also in strategic competition with one another. “His favorite example was if you can pit your strengths against someone else’s weakness and get them to respond in a way that makes them weaker and weaker, you can put them out of business without ever fighting,”....He had early insight into the economic troubles the Soviet Union was having, and helped develop strategies to exacerbate those problems and help bring about the demise of the Soviet Union....In 2009, Robert M. Gates, the defense secretary at the time, asked Mr. Marshall to write a classified strategy on China with Gen. Jim Mattis, the future defense secretary.
adversaries  assessments_&_evaluations  China  China_rising  classified  economists  éminence_grise  future  futurists  inspiration  institutional_memory  long-range  long-term  obituaries  Pentagon  policymakers  problem_framing  RAND  rising_powers  Robert_Gates  SecDef  security_&_intelligence  strategic_thinking  threats  trailblazers  uChicago 
march 2019 by jerryking
Barbara Gardner Proctor Became a Role Model for African-American Women
Jan. 25, 2019 | WSJ | By James R. Hagerty.

Barbara Gardner Proctor applied for a Small Business Administration loan to start an advertising firm in 1970, she was asked what her collateral was. “Me,” she replied. That turned out to be solid backing for the loan. Her Chicago-based firm, Proctor & Gardner Advertising Inc., lasted for 25 years and worked for clients including Kraft Foods and Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Though the firm never had more than a couple dozen employees, she became a role model for African-American women staking out positions of influence.
advertising  advertising_agencies  African-Americans  Barbara_Proctor  public_relations  trailblazers  women  Chicago  concision  writing  obituaries 
january 2019 by jerryking
Sandra Day O’Connor, first female justice on U.S. Supreme Court, reveals she has dementia - The Globe and Mail
OCTOBER 23, 2018 | THE NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | MATTHEW HAAG.

Ms. O’Connor was born in El Paso, Texas, and grew up in Arizona on the Lazy B Ranch, 250 square miles of high desert along the state’s border with New Mexico. Her upbringing has remained a point of pride, and she has often referred to herself as a cowgirl.

“It is possible to survive and even make a living in that formidable terrain,” she wrote in her memoir of her childhood, “Lazy B,” in 2002. “The Day family did it for years; but it was never easy. It takes planning, patience, skill and endurance.”

She left Arizona for Stanford Law School, where she finished third in her class in 1952. It was also where she met her future husband, a fellow law-review editor at the university.

The top graduate in her class was William H. Rehnquist, the future chief justice, who received a clerkship on the Supreme Court.
cancers  civics  dementia  judges  lawyers  Sandra_Day_O'Connor  trailblazers  U.S._Supreme_Court  women  Alzheimer’s_disease 
october 2018 by jerryking
Trailblazing judge George Ethelbert Carter embodied ethics - The Globe and Mail
JOHN LORINC
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

become not only one of Toronto’s first black lawyers, but also this country’s first Canadian-born black judge. A member of the Order of Ontario and a Queen’s Counsel, he died in Toronto on June 7 at the age of 96.

Justice Carter loomed large among black lawyers and judges, and also in Canada’s legal profession generally, observes Toronto criminal lawyer Selwyn Pieters. “He exuded the ethical principles and professionalism lawyers strive to live by. He was a role model and a trailblazer.”
African_Canadians  John_Lorinc  judges  lawyers  obituaries  trailblazers 
june 2018 by jerryking
Opinion | The Man Who Changed the World, Twice - The New York Times
May 8, 2018 | NYT | by David Brooks.
This column is about a man, Stewart Brand, who changed the world, at least twice. I want to focus less on the impact of his work, which is all around us, and more on how he did it, because he’s a model of how you do social change.....In 1965, Brand created a multimedia presentation called “America Needs Indians,” which he performed at the LSD-laced, proto-hippie gatherings he helped organize in California.

Brand then had two epiphanies. First, there were no public photos of the entire earth. Second, if people like him were going to return to the land and lead natural lives, they would need tools......launched the the “Whole Earth Catalog.”....the Catalog....was also a bible for what would come to be known as the counterculture, full of reading lists and rich with the ideas of Buckminster Fuller and others........When a culture changes, it’s often because a small group of people on society’s margins find a better way to live, parts of which the mainstream adopts. Brand found a magic circle in the Bay Area counterculture. He celebrated it, publicized it, gave it a coherence it otherwise lacked and encouraged millions to join.....The communes fizzled. But on the other side of the Bay Area, Brand sensed another cultural wave building-- computers!! Brand and others imagined computers launching a consciousness revolution — personal tools to build neural communities that would blow the minds of mainstream America. [See Fred Turner says in “From Counterculture to Cyberculture,” ].......Brand played cultural craftsman once again, as a celebrity journalist. In 1972 he wrote a piece for Rolling Stone announcing the emergence of a new outlaw hacker culture..... Brand is a talented community architect. In the 1970s, he was meshing Menlo Park computer geeks with cool hippie types. The tech people were entranced by “Whole Earth,” including Steve Jobs....In 1985, Brand and Larry Brilliant helped create the Well, an early online platform (like Usenet) where techies could meet and share. .......Brand’s gift, Frank Foer writes in “World Without Mind,” is “to channel the spiritual longings of his generation and then to explain how they could be fulfilled through technology.” Innovations don’t just proceed by science alone; as Foer continues, “the culture prods them into existence.”....... Brooks argues that the computer has failed as a source of true community. Social media seems to immiserate people as much as it bonds them. And so there’s a need for future Brands, young cultural craftsmen who identify those who are building the future, synthesizing their work into a common ethos and bringing them together in a way that satisfies the eternal desire for community and wholeness.

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Third, the age seems to reward procedural architects (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. , people who can design an architecture/platform that allows other people to express ideas or to collaborate. Fourth, people who can organize a decentralized network around a clear question, without letting it dissipate or clump, will have enormous value. Fifth, essentialists will probably be rewarded--the ability to grasp the essence of one thing, and then the essence of some very different thing, and smash them together to create some entirely new thing. Sixth, the computer is the computer. The role of the human is not to be dispassionate, depersonalized or neutral. It is precisely the emotive traits that are rewarded: the voracious lust for understanding, the enthusiasm for work, the ability to grasp the gist, the empathetic sensitivity to what will attract attention and linger in the mind. Unable to compete when it comes to calculation, the best workers will come with heart in hand.
David_Brooks  Stewart_Brand  community_builders  product_launches  counterculture  community_organizing  Silicon_Valley  '70s  trailblazers  social_change  role_models  via:marshallk  hackers  social_media  Steve_Jobs  books 
may 2018 by jerryking
Roger Bannister, athlete, 1929-2018
March 4, 2018 | FT | by Pat Butcher and Matthew Garrahan. 10 HOURS AGO
obituaries  athletes_&_athletics  doctors  Oxford  trailblazers  running 
march 2018 by jerryking
20 Years On, Amazon and Jeff Bezos Prove Naysayers Wrong - The New York Times
Andrew Ross Sorkin
DEALBOOK MAY 15, 2017

Twenty years ago this week, Amazon.com went public........Here we are, 20 years later, and Mr. Bezos has an authentic, legitimate claim on having changed the way we live.

He has changed the way we shop. He has changed the way companies use computers, by moving much of their information and systems to cloud services. He’s even changed the way we interact with computers by voice: “Alexa!”......he has bought — and fixed — The Washington Post,.........Most executives are worried about the next quarter, but Mr. Bezos is worried about what will happen years from now. That is a competitive advantage that many chief executives could learn from.

“If everything you do needs to work on a three-year time horizon, then you’re competing against a lot of people,” Mr. Bezos told Wired in 2011. Here, he was expressing the view that some chief executives think in three-year cycles — a relatively generous assessment, given that most top executives don’t last many more years than that.

“But,” he continued, “if you’re willing to invest on a seven-year time horizon, you’re now competing against a fraction of those people, because very few companies are willing to do that.”....Is Mr. Bezos an easy boss? Hardly. He is unbelievably demanding. ......I’m supposed to hate Mr. Bezos. After all, he has pressured publishers, cut their margins and practically put old-school bookstores out of business. As if to rub it in, he’s now introducing bricks-and-mortar Amazon bookstores.

But to take that view would be to misunderstand what innovation looks like. It upends industries — witness the current carnage in the retail industry, which has been outmoded by Amazon and all the companies trying to copy it.

“Amazon is not happening to book selling,” Mr. Bezos explained, defending his role in a 2013 interview with Charlie Rose. “The future is happening to book selling.” And the future is now happening to retail stores and even supermarkets — Mr. Bezos’ next conquest. And the future is clearly happening to enterprise computing.
Andrew_Sorkin  Jeff_Bezos  Amazon  WaPo  newspapers  e-commerce  innovation  anniversaries  moguls  trailblazers  cloud_computing  Alexa  long-term  Warren_Buffett 
may 2017 by jerryking
An Ad Woman at the Top of an Industry That She Thinks Still Has Far to Go - The New York Times
APRIL 24, 2017 | NYT | By SAPNA MAHESHWARI.

The American workplace and the ad industry have evolved strikingly since then, but perhaps not fast enough. On Tuesday evening, Ms. Williams will be the first African-American woman with a creative agency background — the class of executives exalted on “Mad Men” — to be inducted into the Advertising Hall of Fame, which was established in 1948.

Ms. Williams, the founder of Carol H. Williams Advertising, got her start at Leo Burnett in Chicago. There she coined the tagline for Secret deodorant — “Strong enough for a man, but made for a woman” — and helped sell Americans on Pillsbury canned frosting back when the boxed version was in vogue.....Ms. Williams eventually became the first woman to be a creative director at Leo Burnett, but her career was not without challenges. She learned to ignore or detach herself from situations where men would say culturally “unacceptable” things, she said, and advanced without having a female boss or peer “to derive mentorship from.”........“In those days, I saw people would execute a project because they enjoyed executing the project and the project was just that to them,” she said. “Whereas when I would execute a project, it impacted the bottom line.”....Ms. Williams said the industry still had work to do in connecting with African-Americans. She is concerned that agencies catering to multicultural audiences employ mass marketing strategies that look to target such consumers simply by casting minorities in ads, or making assumptions based on social media data.

“It becomes an issue of, ‘If they see themselves in a commercial, they’ll buy the product,’ rather than it being about the messaging and how that messaging is delivered to them,” she said.

Some companies are also using digital technology to “withdraw what they perceive as insights out of these communities,” she added, instead of “developing research techniques to really get to know this culture.”
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The 3% Conference, which supports female creative leadership at agencies, has estimated that only 11 percent of creative directors are women, even as they account for half of the industry’s work force. For black women, the field is even tougher: Last month, the Interpublic Group publicized statistics from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission showing that fewer than 1 percent of executives in advertising, public relations and related services are black women.
advertising  advertising_agencies  African-Americans  Carol_Williams  EEOC  Interpublic  Leo_Burnett  public_relations  trailblazers  women 
april 2017 by jerryking
Harry and Sidney: Soul Brothers - The New York Times
Charles M. Blow FEB. 20, 2017

Belafonte and Poitier demonstrated over a lifetime how celebrities could embody activism as well as the quiet power of dignity and grace.

King once said of Poitier: “He is a man of great depth, a man of great social concern, a man who is dedicated to human rights and freedom. Here is a man who, in the words we so often hear now, is a soul brother.”

In fact, I think that is what Poitier and Belafonte found in each other: a soul brother. Happy birthday, gentlemen.
Charles_Blow  trailblazers  civil_rights  celebrities  actors  African-Americans  friendships  Caribbean  '60s  iconic 
february 2017 by jerryking
Julie Dash Made a Movie. Then Hollywood Shut Her Out.
NOV. 18, 2016 | The New York Times| By CARA BUCKLEY.

Julie Dash’s 1991 film, “Daughters of the Dust”, about Gullah women on the Sea Islands off the Southeastern United States in the early 1900s who are tugged north by the Great Migration, celebrated its 25th anniversary....Along with reveling in the film’s restoration, rerelease and Beyoncé-borne attention, Ms. Dash was recently inducted, to her delight, into the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences as part of its effort to diversify its membership....Ms. Dash is still having trouble getting through the door. The agent she eventually ended up with died years ago, and for all her efforts, she said, she has not been able to get another one since.
films  movies  Hollywood  Beyoncé  women  African-Americans  anniversaries  trailblazers  filmmakers  Great_Migration  Gullah  storytelling  '90s 
november 2016 by jerryking
Africans were pioneers in business in Guyana
January 12, 2010 | Stabroek News | F. Skinner.

Africans are the pioneers of the majority of business trends and innovations in Guyana, but there is hardly any tangible proof of this. Their ideas were worked and developed only to change hands with no royalties attached. ...Mr King identified many problems/obstacles facing the African businessman. He pointed out that if an Indian is a barber his son and even grandson are destined to be barbers. Next, the lack of other rich African businessmen to turn to for support – financial or business advice – when the banks and your competitors gang up against you.....He discussed the proposition with his closest friends and was asked, “What you gon do wid all that property?” He admitted that it was not that his friends were deliberately giving him bad advice, it was that they simply did not know and he was no different. He regretted the missed opportunity because a few years later one year’s rental of a small section on the ground floor would have paid for the entire property at the time....They ran into financial problems and got some assistance from the government, which was not enough. Which African organization could they have turned to for financial assistance? The same can be said about another three who had the stone quarry....All the persons mentioned were out there with their shoulders to the wheel. There are reasons for their failures. We must identify these reasons and address them as a community. Glaring though is the lack of a support system in the community.
We must accept that we must generate wealth and not just depend on education, a salaried job or a government. We must be able to be trustworthy to each other. We must stop this individualist approach to business. One ‘pointer’ can’t sweep. Our foreparents trusted each other enough to form co-ops and bought land.
Afro-Guyanese  small_business  history  '70s  entrepreneurship  letters_to_the_editor  Guyanese  trailblazers  trustworthiness  advice  pioneers  missed_opportunities  regrets  support_systems  challenges  wealth_creation  failure  post-mortems  disunity 
june 2016 by jerryking
‘Grown-up who steered the Fab Four to Stardom
12 March/13 March 2016 | FT | Ludovic Hunter-Tilney. Obit of George Martin, Beatles' producer.

"Martin was measured about his contribution. "I was purely an interpreter," he said, "The genius was theirs, no doubt about that"
Beatles  obituaries  '60s  trailblazers  music  engineering  producers  interpretation 
april 2016 by jerryking
Trying to Separate Bill Cosby From Cliff Huxtable - The New York Times
By RACHEL L. SWARNS JAN. 31, 2016

When an artist is disgraced, what happens to his art? What in the world will become of Dr. Huxtable?
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Many people are deeply flawed and everyone has to wrestle with their relationship to them. What they create is one thing, who they are is another - for me the two can co-exist, as they must.....Great people are flawed, and evil people have unexpected qualities. It is only in our desire to fit everyone into a nice one-dimensional box that we struggle. ...Very few half hour TV sitcoms show complex characters. When the weekly showing of a beloved one dimensional character must co-exist with with the real life actor whose private behaviour crosses so many lines of good manners, morality or criminality, viewers rarely are able to look at the "art" without seeing the "artist". Reconciling any perfect image with "tarnished" reality is difficult whether examining the work and lives of sports heroes, elected officials, rock stars, bishops or authors.
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role_models  compartmentalization  actors  Bill_Cosby  grieving  African-Americans  scandals  trailblazers  sexual_misconduct 
february 2016 by jerryking
How to be a Top-Gun Deal Maker | Ivey Business Journal
by: Michael Benoliel

[8 April/9 April 2017; Letter to the editor by Bruce Mathers] "It is axiomatic that negotiators who understand their opponents have a strong advantage"
Robert_Johnson  BET  dealmakers  deal-making  howto  moguls  CATV  African-Americans  entrepreneur  Viacom  Second_Acts  NBA  trailblazers  negotiations 
july 2015 by jerryking
No barrier’s too big for Brazilian hair-care pioneer
Mar. 20 2015 | The Globe and Mail | STEPHANIE NOLEN.

The barrier-breaking Leila Velez: By bringing fast-food standardization and Disney’s customer-service model to her hair-care business serving Brazil’s black and mixed-race women, the bootstraps entrepreneur has taken Beleza Natural from one tiny storefront to a chain of 29 locations – and her ambitions don't stop there.
Stephanie_Nolen  personal_care_products  personal_grooming  Brazilian  gazelles  women  trailblazers  Afro-Brazilians  hair  standardization  entrepreneur 
march 2015 by jerryking
Lincoln Alexander Becomes Canada's First Black Lt.-Governor
September 20, 2013 | Globe & Mail | Karen Howlett

As the first black to hold a vice-regal post in Canada, he was a symbol of society’s growing intolerance for racial prejudice. Lincoln Alexander, the son of a railway porter and a maid, was sworn in as Ontario’s 24th lieutenant-governor at the age of 63. He had grown up in an era when blacks were denied the basic rights and opportunities enjoyed by whites, something he experienced firsthand when he could not get a sales job at Stelco - he was told customers would not want to deal with a black man. His appointment as the Queen’s representative capped a distinguished career for the first black member of Parliament and the first black federal cabinet minister. “I want to believe it served as a beacon of hope for the black community," Alexander wrote in his memoir. He died last year, his beacon still bright.
Lincoln_Alexander  African_Canadians  trailblazers  anniversaries  lawyers  politicians 
november 2013 by jerryking
Harriet Tubman's Great Raid - NYTimes.com
June 7, 2013, 11:19 pm 29 Comments
Harriet Tubman’s Great Raid
By PAUL DONNELLY
slavery  Underground_Railroad  the_South  trailblazers  African-Americans  women  Civil_War  Harriet_Tubman 
june 2013 by jerryking
Monique Maddy and Mobile Opportunities
WSJ | by Tom Petzinger Jr.

The whole package is priced for people making $200 a month. "Virtual phone service," the company calls it.
wireless  mobile_phones  Africa  trailblazers  HBS  women  entrepreneur  Tanzania  Thomas_Petzinger 
february 2013 by jerryking
Rachel Carson’s Lessons, 50 Years After ‘Silent Spring’ - NYTimes.com
By NANCY F. KOEHN
Published: October 27, 2012

Rachel Carson, throughout her personal and public struggles, she was an informed spokeswoman for environmental responsibility.

She was a classic introvert who exhibited few of the typical qualities associated with leadership, like charisma and aggressiveness. But as people like Susan Cain, author of “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking,” have pointed out, leadership can come in less obvious forms.... her story is a reminder that one person’s quiet leadership can make a difference.... RACHEL CARSON’S story offers many leadership lessons, including the importance of persistence in pursuing an objective. When I discuss her with business executives, many are struck by her ability to stay focused on goals in the face of obstacles including severe illness.

Another lesson involves the importance of doing thorough research and taking the long view. A sense of context based on hard facts, along with a knowledge of history, is essential to understanding what’s at stake in difficult and uncertain situations. It also confers a sense of authority on the person who has acquired this knowledge.

A third insight concerns the juggling of personal demands and professional ambitions. Carson understood the challenge — and satisfaction — of dealing with our obligations to others even as we follow our professional drive. And she saw that this can rarely be navigated smoothly. For her, and for many executives with whom I have worked, times of great productivity were followed by fallow periods when ambitions had to be put aside for personal reasons.
solo  leadership  environment  cancers  women  non-obvious  trailblazers  books  introverts  contextual  long-term  history 
october 2012 by jerryking
Thomas Perkins
August 26, 1996 | FORBES ASAP |Owen Edwards
Kleiner_Perkins  venture_capital  vc  trailblazers  HP  Tom_Perkins  passions 
july 2012 by jerryking
Businessman Parlays Expertise to Help Others
Aug 1995 | Emerge | Ernest Holsendolph.

''I think that those at us who have been fortunate enough to gain the contacts should reach out to help true entrepreneurs with financing and the know-how to build significant businesses that can employ large numbers of people," Hill says. "I'm developing people and I can help by opening doors that no one elee can open"...."lf I were to come along today, l would get an MBA. I would aim for management and finance and I would be drawn to economic development -- especially ways to stimulate the urban ecunamy and help Black people be employed," Hill says. "I just don't believe there is any higher calling for a talented business person these days than to tackle the job of developing our communities."
African-Americans  trailblazers  retirement  Atlanta  entrepreneur  airports  actuarial_science  urban  economic_development 
june 2012 by jerryking
Meet the man who shaped 20th-century Toronto - The Globe and Mail
JOHN LORINC
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 18, 2012

Rowland Caldwell Harris – who began a 33-year term as works commissioner a century ago this week – left his civic fingerprints all over Toronto, building hundreds of kilometres of sidewalks, sewers, paved roads, streetcar tracks, public baths and washrooms, landmark bridges and even the precursor plans to the GO commuter rail network.

“The significance of Harris a hundred years later is that we’re still living fundamentally in the city he imagined,” observes Dalhousie architecture professor Steven Mannell, who studies his career and has advised city officials on an extensive rehabilitation of the R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant, due to be finished next year.

Mr. Harris famously added a second deck to the Prince Edward Viaduct in anticipation of a subway line that wasn’t built for decades. What’s less well known is that Mr. Harris was a photo buff who, in 1930, presided over the city’s first planning exercise – a process that led to construction of congestion-easing arterials such as Dundas Street East and the parkway extension of Mount Pleasant through Rosedale and up towards St. Clair.
John_Lorinc  Toronto  trailblazers  R.C._Harris  architecture  wastewater-treatment  infrastructure  municipalities  urban  urban_planning  landmarks  bridges  foresight  imagination  TTC  '30s  city_builders 
may 2012 by jerryking
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