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jerryking : transactional_relationships   10

Donald Trump Poisons the World
JUNE 2, 2017 | The New York Times | David Brooks.

This week, two of Donald Trump’s top advisers, H. R. McMaster and Gary Cohn, wrote the following passage in The Wall Street Journal: “The president embarked on his first foreign trip with a cleareyed outlook that the world is not a ‘global community’ but an arena where nations, nongovernmental actors and businesses engage and compete for advantage.”

That sentence is the epitome of the Trump project. It asserts that selfishness is the sole driver of human affairs. It grows out of a worldview that life is a competitive struggle for gain. It implies that cooperative communities are hypocritical covers for the selfish jockeying underneath.

The essay explains why the Trump people are suspicious of any cooperative global arrangement, like NATO and the various trade agreements. It helps explain why Trump pulled out of the Paris global-warming accord. This essay explains why Trump gravitates toward leaders like Vladimir Putin, the Saudi princes and various global strongmen: They share his core worldview that life is nakedly a selfish struggle for money and dominance.

It explains why people in the Trump White House are so savage to one another. Far from being a band of brothers, their world is a vicious arena where staffers compete for advantage......In the essay, McMaster and Cohn make explicit the great act of moral decoupling woven through this presidency. In this worldview, morality has nothing to do with anything. Altruism, trust, cooperation and virtue are unaffordable luxuries in the struggle of all against all. Everything is about self-interest. David Brooks contends that this philosophy is based on an error about human beings and it leads to self-destructive behavior in all cases.

The error is that it misunderstands what drives human action. Yes, people are self-interested but they are also wired to cooperate....Good leaders like Lincoln, Churchill, Roosevelt and Reagan understand the selfish elements that drive human behavior, but they have another foot in the realm of the moral motivations. They seek to inspire faithfulness by showing good character. They try to motivate action by pointing toward great ideals.

Realist leaders like Trump, McMaster and Cohn seek to dismiss this whole moral realm. By behaving with naked selfishness toward others, they poison the common realm and they force others to behave with naked selfishness toward them........By treating the world simply as an arena for competitive advantage, Trump, McMaster and Cohn sever relationships, destroy reciprocity, erode trust and eviscerate the sense of sympathy, friendship and loyalty that all nations need when times get tough.....George Marshall was no idealistic patsy. He understood that America extends its power when it offers a cooperative hand and volunteers for common service toward a great ideal. Realists reverse that formula. They assume strife and so arouse a volley of strife against themselves.
commonwealth  op-ed  climate_change  Donald_Trump  Gary_Cohn  decoupling  worldviews  WSJ  H.R._McMaster  selfishness  U.S.foreign_policy  Greek  morals  realism  George_Marshall  Marshall_Plan  self-interest  autocrats  Thucydides  David_Brooks  transactional_relationships  national_interests  institutions  international_system  values  human_behavior 
june 2017 by jerryking
The new game | The Economist
Oct 17th 2015 |

America still has resources other powers lack. Foremost is its web of alliances, including NATO. Whereas Mr Obama sometimes behaves as if alliances are transactional, they need solid foundations. America’s military power is unmatched, but it is hindered by pork-barrel politics and automatic cuts mandated by Congress. These spring from the biggest brake on American leadership: dysfunctional politics in Washington. That is not just a poor advertisement for democracy; it also stymies America’s interest. In the new game it is something that the United States—and the world—can ill afford.
Asia_Pacific  China  gridlocked_politics  indispensable  influence  international_system  NATO  networks  network_density  network_power  political_power  Obama  Russia  South_China_Sea  strategic_alliances  superpowers  Syria  transactional_relationships  U.S.foreign_policy  politics  Vladimir_Putin 
october 2015 by jerryking
Membership Experience Not Membership Math
Posted by Amanda Kaiser on Sep 5, 2014

How do you move members away from doing that mental math? How do you make joining less transactional and focus more on experience?

Help members solve more important problems

Our visits to the zoo solve many problems for me. Superficially, we are active and outside – but I can get this at a playground. More importantly, we are having fun and learning something. Most important, I believe that experiences like this can help teach my son those life skills that will help him be well rounded, fulfilled and giving person.

The zoo markets fun and learning but stories from higher up the list of mom’s needs would resonate far more. You see this play out successfully with the big brands. Harley Davidson means freedom not transportation. Coke means youth and fun not sugar water.

You can provide the most value when you help solve your member’s most important problems.

Provide special member experiences

Many member benefits lists read like a math equation: 10% off for members, a $50 savings, and 1 free guest. This is hardly compelling reading and it is not so compelling in the decision making process either. The logic is there but the emotion is missing.

How to help LBMA members package the emotional benefits of joining so that they can be shared back at their companies?
memberships  LBMA  associations  branding  transactional_relationships  brands  value_propositions  experience  emotions  OPMA  worthwhile_problems 
july 2015 by jerryking
The Mind of Marc Andreessen - The New Yorker
MAY 18, 2015 | New Yorker | BY TAD FRIEND.

Doug Leone, one of the leaders of Sequoia Capital, by consensus Silicon Valley’s top firm, said, “The biggest outcomes come when you break your previous mental model. The black-swan events of the past forty years—the PC, the router, the Internet, the iPhone—nobody had theses around those. So what’s useful to us is having Dumbo ears.”* A great V.C. keeps his ears pricked for a disturbing story with the elements of a fairy tale. This tale begins in another age (which happens to be the future), and features a lowborn hero who knows a secret from his hardscrabble experience. The hero encounters royalty (the V.C.s) who test him, and he harnesses magic (technology) to prevail. The tale ends in heaping treasure chests for all, borne home on the unicorn’s back....Marc Andreessen is tomorrow’s advance man, routinely laying out “what will happen in the next ten, twenty, thirty years,” as if he were glancing at his Google calendar. He views his acuity as a matter of careful observation and extrapolation, and often invokes William Gibson’s observation “The future is already here—it’s just not very evenly distributed.”....Andreessen applies a maxim from his friend and intellectual sparring partner Peter Thiel, who co-founded PayPal and was an early investor in LinkedIn and Yelp. When a reputable venture firm leads two consecutive rounds of investment in a company, Andreessen told me, Thiel believes that that is “a screaming buy signal, and the bigger the markup on the last round the more undervalued the company is.” Thiel’s point, which takes a moment to digest, is that, when a company grows extremely rapidly, even its bullish V.C.s, having recently set a relatively low value on the previous round, will be slightly stuck in the past. The faster the growth, the farther behind they’ll be....When a16z began, it didn’t have even an ersatz track record to promote. So Andreessen and Horowitz consulted on tactics with their friend Michael Ovitz, who co-founded the Hollywood talent agency Creative Artists Agency, in 1974. Ovitz told me that he’d advised them to distinguish themselves by treating the entrepreneur as a client: “Take the long view of your platform, rather than a transactional one. Call everyone a partner, offer services the others don’t, and help people who aren’t your clients. Disrupt to differentiate by becoming a dream-execution machine.”
Marc_Andreessen  Andreessen_Horowitz  Silicon_Valley  transactional_relationships  venture_capital  vc  Peter_Thiel  long-term  far-sightedness  Sequoia  mindsets  observations  partnerships  listening  insights  Doug_Leone  talent_representation  CAA  mental_models  warning_signs  signals  beforemath  unevenly_distributed  low_value  extrapolations  acuity  professional_service_firms  Michael_Ovitz  execution  William_Gibson 
may 2015 by jerryking
The man with the key to China: Barrick Gold’s quest to open new doors - The Globe and Mail
Dec. 06 2013 | The Globe and Mail | RACHELLE YOUNGLAI - MINING REPORTER.

The former Goldman Sachs president has spent more than 20 years working with Chinese policymakers. He shares Mr. Munk’s vision of turning Barrick into a diversified mining giant and tapping China to join the effort...Mr. Thornton said his Barrick talks with the Chinese have been with the highest levels of the communist government right on down the system. He stresses he does not want what he calls a “transactional” or one-off deal with the Chinese. He wants to build an enduring relationship with the government...Mr. Thornton envisions Barrick first doing one “thing that is relatively modest” with the Chinese. For example, he says Barrick could consider a Chinese construction company for Pascua Lama. Mr. Thornton has not spoken to any such companies about the South American mine and says it’s only an example.

Michael Evans, a Goldman vice-chairman who worked with Mr. Thornton for years in London and Asia, describes Mr. Thornton as a hugely strategic operator who “loves flawless execution” and prefers to work behind the scenes...In the mid-1990s, Mr. Thornton got wind that the vice-premier at the time, Zhu Rongji, wanted to reform some of the country’s state-owned telecoms.

Mr. Thornton, who had taken Britain’s Vodafone public in the late-1980s, arranged for a meeting with the number 2 banker at the newly formed state-owned Chinese investment bank, a Chinese national who did not speak English.

Through a translator late at night in Beijing, Mr. Thornton said: “Here’s the real situation, you call yourself a banker and yet you know nothing about banking. I am in charge of Goldman Sachs Asia and China and I know nothing about any one of those. So we have a perfect marriage here. You’re going to teach me China and I am going to teach you banking and I am going to make you look like a hero in front of Zhu Rongji and everyone else who is important to you. And I don’t need any visibility, credit, anything. All I want to do is understand China out of this whole process.”

Mr. Thornton stressed his experience with Vodafone...
Barrick  gold  mining  John_Thornton  CEOs  relationships  Goldman_Sachs  personal_connections  Tsinghua  boards_&_directors_&_governance  barter  transactional_relationships 
december 2013 by jerryking
Four Executives on Succeeding in Business as a Woman - NYTimes.com
October 12, 2013 | NYT | By ADAM BRYANT.

You need to spend political capital — be unafraid to introduce people, compliment somebody when it’s deserved and stand up for something you really believe in, rather than just go with the flow. I don’t mean being a perennial troublemaker, but it’s about having conviction and courage. Spend that political capital you earn by being intellectually credible, by being a fighter for the people on your team when appropriate, and by arguing for principles that matter. Those are qualities that give you credit. If you’re waiting for the perfect moment to spend that capital, you’re going to be sidelined your whole career waiting to just kind of enter the ring.

Women can and should do a better job of helping one another to be in that transactional forum, and to get over the anxiety that we’re going to be found wanting on the wrong side of that equation. We’re undervaluing the role that we can play in the success of other people and the organization. So don’t be afraid to spend some of that political capital. You have to be well prepared, you have to be smart, you have to be on time, you have to be responsive, you have to be respectful, you have to have principles. But once you have all those things and you’ve built a track record, don’t wait for the perfect day.
women  CEOs  movingonup  lessons_learned  gender_gap  executive_management  leaders  leadership  political_capital  principles  courage  convictions  punctuality  transactions  transactional_relationships  troublemakers  responsiveness  on-time 
october 2013 by jerryking
Meet Bay St.'s new breed of deal makers
April 4, 2007 | G&M pg. B10 | by Jacquie McNish.

Days after Ottawa's Halloween clampdown on income trusts, a team of Bay Street dealmakers flew to New York to alert a handful of private equity funds to potential Canadian trust takeovers.

Investment bankers pitch deals to ravenous private equity buyers all the time, but this group was unique because they were lawyers.

Canadian firms can no longer be complacent about private equity deals. As traditional Canadian corporate clients fall on the takeover battleground, Canada’s major firms are moving quickly to grab their share of private equity deals.

Some law firms are wooing private equity funds by aggressively promoting deals, while most are starting to share risks by taking fee cuts on unsuccessful takeovers and pocketing fee premiums on deal victories.

A few are so eager to represent the powerful acquirers that a single firm will act for multiple buyers vying for the same target.

The deal frenzy is shifting legal M&A away from long-term relationships to a more transaction-oriented practice that is seeing firms hop in and out of deals with an ever-changing group of buyers and sellers.

Stephen Donovan, co-head of Torys’ Private Equity Group, adds, "It is no longer enough to just know the law. There is a much more deliberate effort to bring deals to clients."
deal-making  dealmakers  lawyers  law_firms  Bay_Street  private_equity  prospectuses  complacency  crossborder  M&A  risk-sharing  transactions  relationships  transactional_relationships  rescue_investing  pitches  proactivity  entrepreneurial  opportunistic 
january 2013 by jerryking
Networking Lessons According to an ex-Goldman partner, women need to get a lot better at the quid pro quo. - November 10, 2003
November 10, 2003 | Fortune | Interview of Connie Duckworth by Bethany McLean.

Networking is the glue of all business--it's the foundation of how business gets done. Your relationships drive how successful you'll be. I had guidance from very good mentors, all of whom were men. There were no women at the time...you can ask someone for something and they'll ask for something back, and that's a norm and an expectation, not an infringement on a personal relationship. It's not personal. It's business.
networking  Goldman_Sachs  women  relationships  mentoring  personal_relationships  quid_pro_quo  transactional_relationships 
march 2012 by jerryking
Connections with Integrity
February 13, 2012 |Strategy + BUsiness | by Reid Hoffman.

The venture capitalist who co-founded LinkedIn reveals the surefire system that he has used since high school for evaluating potential business relationships.....It seems counterintuitive, but the more altruistic your attitude, the more benefits you will gain from the relationship. If you insist on a quid pro quo every time you help others, you will have a much narrower network and a more limited set of opportunities. Conversely, if you set out to help others by introducing them to the right people, simply because you think it’s the right thing to do, you will rapidly reinforce your own reputation and expand your universe of possibilities. For me, that is the greatest value of understanding alliances; it can help you build the kind of network on which great careers are built.
networking  LinkedIn  Reid_Hoffman  social_networking  social_capital  serving_others  counterintuitive  transactional_relationships  integrity  quid_pro_quo  alliance  the_right_people  personal_connections 
march 2012 by jerryking
How To Lunch
May 3, 2010 | Financial Times pg. 12 | by Rhymer Rigby. How do
you make sure your working lunch works?
What is the point of a business lunch? Unlike a meeting, sitting down
and breaking bread with someone gives them a chance to open up, relax
and make a real connection." "Lunch is more discursive and an
opportunity to talk more broadly," "A business lunch turns a
transactional relationship into something deeper."tell people why you're
inviting them to lunch," says Ms Ellis. "Is it to discuss strategy or
to thank them for putting business your way? If you don't tell them, it
can be awkward."
ProQuest  etiquette  networking  howto  restaurants  lunchtime  personal_connections  Communicating_&_Connecting  transactional_relationships  candour  transparency 
may 2010 by jerryking

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