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jerryking : translations   9

The Language Barrier Is About to Fall - WSJ
By ALEC ROSS
Jan. 29, 2016

Universal machine translation should accelerate the world’s growing interconnectedness. While the current stage of globalization was propelled in no small part by the adoption of English as the lingua franca for business—to the point that there are now twice as many nonnative English speakers as native speakers—the next wave will open up communication even more broadly by removing the need for a shared language. Currently, when Korean-speaking businesspeople speak with Mandarin-speaking executives at a conference in Brazil, they converse in English. There will no longer be this need, opening the door of global business for nonelites and a massive number of non-English speakers.
languages  globalization  machine_learning  translations 
january 2016 by jerryking
It’s not a small world after all - The Globe and Mail
PICO IYER
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Saturday, Jun. 06, 2015

Yes, we may share the same cultural products. But go to a showing of Avatar in China, and tell me that it carries the same meaning for its audience as it would in Studio City. For the former, I’m sure, it’s as much about environmental destruction as to the latter it might be about a dazzling new technology. Watch the same movie in Baghdad and it becomes a parable about imperialism. Every country may draw from the same pop-cultural pool, but each translates it into its own context and language and tradition. We file into the same movie, but come out having seen a radically different film.

Again and again, in fact, what strikes me when I touch down in Jerusalem or Pyongyang is not how much it shares with Washington or London, but how much it doesn’t, in spite of common surfaces, (yes, nine months ago, I did see the two pizzerias and the 36-lane bowling-alley in North Korea’s capital). Which is why travel is more urgent than ever: Our screens vividly bring faraway places into our homes, projecting an image of closeness, but every encounter with the foreign in the flesh reminds us forcibly of how much lies far beyond our reckoning.
translations  contextual  national_identity  travel  interpretation  cultural_products 
june 2015 by jerryking
A conversation that translates
June 7, 2012 | The Financial Times pg. 14 | Philip Delves Broughton.
(Pass on to Abdoulaye DIOP)
For global companies, creating an approach to risk that resonates across cultures can be a challenge, writes Philip Delves Broughton

Risk is a risky word. Already prone to misinterpretation among people who share a language and a culture, the difficulties multiply dangerously when it moves across borders.

What a Wall Street trader might define as moderately risky may seem downright insane to a Japanese retail broker; what an oil pipeline engineer in Brazil might characterise as gung-ho may appear overcautious to his revenue-chasing chief executive in London....The greatest pitfalls in managing risk across borders, he says, emerge from assuming too much. When dealing with fellow English speakers, it is easy to imagine that a shared language means shared assumptions - that the English, Americans and Australians think the same thing because they are using the same words.... Tips for managing risk across borders

Context is more important than language. Understand what matters most in the markets where you are doing business. Is it the law, logic or maintaining relationships?

Every word comes with its own "metadata" in different cultures. Be as specific as you can and never assume you have been properly understood without checking for potential misunderstandings.
cultural_assumptions  risks  risk-management  Communicating_&_Connecting  globalization  organizational_culture  transactions  national_identity  Philip_Delves_Broughton  translations  assumptions  misinterpretations  contextual  metadata  specificity  crossborder  cross-cultural  misunderstandings  interpretation  conversations  risk-assessment  words  compounded  risk-perception  multiplicative 
september 2012 by jerryking
Leak Offers Look at Efforts by U.S. to Spy on Israel - NYTimes.com
Sept. 5, 2011 | NYT | By SCOTT SHANE. Shamai Leibowitz, an FBI
translator, sentenced to 20 mths in prison last yr. for leaking
classified info. to a blogger. The info. detailed concerns re.Israel’s
efforts to influence Congress & public opinion, & fears that
Israel might strike nuclear facilities in Iran...While the U.S. govt.
routinely eavesdrops on some embassies inside the U.S., intelligence
collection against allies is always politically delicate, especially one
as close as Israel...The FBI listens in on foreign embassies &
officials in the U.S. chiefly to track foreign spies, though any
intelligence it obtains on other matters is passed on to the CIA &
other agencies. The intercepts are carried out by the FBI’s Operational
Tech. Division, according to Matthew Aid, a writer who describes the
monitoring in a book, “Intel Wars,” to be published in January...Treated
as highly classified by the FBI, the fact that the U.S. spies on Israel
is taken for granted by intelligence experts.
espionage  security_&_intelligence  Israeli  CIA  FBI  NSA  translations  intercepts  Israel  eavesdropping  books  covert_operations  wiretaps 
september 2011 by jerryking
Three Global Game-Changers for the Information Industry
Dec. 2010 | EContent | Ben Sargent. Here are 3 game-changing
opportunities & challenges that product planners & mktg.managers
must engage:
1. Your future entails a hundred languages, give or take. Each year,
more of the world’s popn. goes online & become info. consumers—but
in an increasingly diverse set of languages. In this year’s update, we
detail 57 economically significant languages needed to reach consumers
& businesses in 101 countries. To successfully
move to this level of multilingual publishing, companies must develop a
process for adding groups of new languages, not one language at a
time—for instance, flipping in one product cycle from 30 languages to
60.
2. The web is a visual medium. Product & mktg. managers must
demand video as an integral part of every product or service, from
conception of the product itself all the way to promotion, sales,
support, & community.
3. Falling translation costs will disrupt the information industry.
ProQuest  languages  multilingual  translations  content  ECM  video  web_video  visualization  product_cycles  localization  game_changers  visual_culture  think_threes 
february 2011 by jerryking
Translation as Ambassador - Publishing and National Pride
December 7, 2010 | NYTimes.com | By LARRY ROHTER. Among
foreign cultural institutes and publishers, the traditional American
aversion to literature in translation is known as “the 3 percent
problem.” But now, hoping to increase their minuscule share of the
American book market — about 3 percent — foreign governments and
foundations, especially those on the margins of Europe, are taking
matters into their own hands and plunging into the publishing fray in
the United States.

Increasingly, that campaign is no longer limited to widely spoken
languages like French and German. From Romania to Catalonia to Iceland,
cultural institutes and agencies are subsidizing publication of books in
English, underwriting the training of translators, encouraging their
writers to tour in the United States, submitting to American marketing
and promotional techniques they may have previously shunned and
exploiting existing niches in the publishing industry.
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From Open books, open borders ☑
OCTOBER 20, 2017 | FT| Janan Ganesh.

The real prize is to comprehend another country’s thought patterns, speech rhythms, historic ghosts and unconscious biases — and these seep out from the stories it tells and the way it tells them....Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker cites the spread of literacy as a reason for the long-term decline of human violence. To read another person’s story is to end up with a larger “circle of sympathy”. But even if America’s concern is the narrowest raison d’état, rather than world peace, it would profit from reading beyond its borders.

The minimum return is that more American readers would have more fun. The headiest writing tends to come from places that are ascendant enough to matter but raw enough to retain some measure of dramatic chaos: 19th-century Britain and Russia, mid-20th-century America, and now, perhaps, early 21st-century Asia. It is not just in economics that protectionism stifles.
translations  publishing  business_planning  books  market_entry  insights  niches  national_pride 
december 2010 by jerryking
Working as a Translator or Interpreter - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 8, 2009 | WSJ | by DIANA MIDDLETON. For Eloise
translations 
december 2009 by jerryking

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