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jerryking : transparency   45

Big Investors Don’t Want Wall Street Analysts Snooping on Them - WSJ
June 14, 2018 | WSJ | By Telis Demos

the research shops are finding ways to make up the lost revenue, turning to readership data. They do say that information is power, and in this case I guess the banks have the power again.
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I think the WSJ is conflating two very different issues. The privacy concerns apply on ethical (possibly criminal) grounds rather than moral ones, in the example given of hedge funds asking a broker to provide aggregated readership data. It's very hard to imagine a responsible research provider doing this. The other piece - the tracking of utilization of research product is exactly what brokers need to do to ensure they are being paid appropriately for the level of service a client is receiving. MiFID 2 has and will continue to put pressure on how much research clients consume, and to precisely account for how much they pay for it. Transparency is a two-way street. A 90-day embargo on the readership data is a simple solution, as quarterly/bi-annual reviews should suffice to true-up the bank/client ledger.

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behavioural_data  investment_research  institutional_investors  reading  research_analysts  snooping  traders  Wall_Street  buy_side  informational_advantages  privacy  transparency 
june 2018 by jerryking
Bridgewater Founder Ray Dalio’s Next Investment
Oct. 13, 2017 | WSJ | By Alexandra Wolfe.

Ray Dalio, founder of Bridgewater Associates, believes in radical truthfulness. He lives by a mélange of maxims about being transparent and embracing reality. “Don’t filter.” “Don’t treat all opinions as equally valuable.” “Don’t ‘pick your battles.’ Fight them all.”

New book, “Principles: Life and Work,” a new 592-page tome about how to succeed. Truth is “the essential foundation for producing good outcomes.” He says it’s also the foundation on which he built Bridgewater, which manages $160 billion.
Ray_Dalio  Bridgewater  hedge_funds  values  truth-telling  transparency  tough_love  books 
october 2017 by jerryking
Ray Dalio and the Market’s Pulse
Sept. 24, 2017 | WSJ | By Andy Kessler

Has Ray Dalio lost the pulse? The founder of the $160 billion hedge fund Bridgewater Associates is all over the place spouting his management philosophy of radical transparency. .....The investment whiz lives and manages by a set of principles that employees have to memorize. ..... “Most problems are potential improvements screaming at you.” Or this reworked cliché: “While most others seem to believe that pain is bad, I believe that pain is required to become stronger.”.....Bridgewater is losing money this year. Through July its flagship fund is down 3%, while the market is up more than 10%. ......The core of investing is quite simple: Determine what everyone else thinks, and then figure out in which direction they are wrong. That’s it. No one tells you what they think. You’ve got to feel it. .....It’s all about figuring out what is priced into a stock right now. That’s the pulse of the market, the collective mind meld aggregated into stock prices. I know from experience this is the hardest part of running a hedge fund. You can find the greatest story ever, but if everyone already knows it, there’s no money to be made..... the pulse changes with each government statistic, each daily ringing of cash registers and satellite images taken of parking lots. That’s why stocks trade every day. Real-world inputs and the drifting pulse drive the psychotic tick of the stock market tape. ....How do you find that pulse? .....

It’s best to survey your own people......Dalio doesn’t care about employees’ opinions or ideas; he just wants to take their pulse to figure out what the market already knows. Or as he puts it: “The biggest mistake most people make is to not see themselves and others objectively.”....Too much capital is often a burden. There are only so many good investment ideas out there, and it’s late in this cycle.....“Truth—more precisely, an accurate understanding of reality—is the essential foundation for any good outcomes.” Here’s a truth: If Bridgewater has lost its mojo, Mr. Dalio would be smart to manage a much smaller pot of money rather than torture his employees.
Andy_Kessler  Ray_Dalio  Bridgewater  hedge_funds  investors  investing  biases  pretense_of_knowledge  principles  transparency  market_sentiment 
september 2017 by jerryking
Businesses must quickly count the cost of cyber crime
8 July /9 July 2017 | Financial Times | Brooke Masters.

Transparency without the full facts can be dangerous....Cyber attacks are frightening and hard for investors to evaluate. Quantify, to the extent possible, the impact as quickly as you can.
computer_viruses  malware  Mondelez  cyber_security  WPP  transparency  cyberattacks  brands 
august 2017 by jerryking
Don't kid yourself that robots are colleagues
4 March 2017/5 March 2017 | Financial Times | by John Thornhill

Lunch with the FT: Daniel Dennett
Cambrian_explosion  philosophers  philosophy  artificial_intelligence  transparency  privacy  institutions 
march 2017 by jerryking
5 Ideas for CEOs Looking for an Edge - WSJ
1 AUG 2016

1 Three Reasons to Befriend Your Competition
(c) You can’t steal our real advantage: Business professors Adam M. Brandenburger of Harvard and Barry J. Nalebuff of Yale have comprehensively explored this idea in their book, Co-Opetition. They build the case that a smart business will leverage the strengths of another to go far beyond what can be done alone.

Here’s the key: I don’t worry about sharing with my competitors because I know that our greatest strength is the execution of our ideas, not the ideas themselves.
2 Why Companies Should Make Their Pay Transparent
leaders have a choice: Be open about pay, or leave a pay-information vacuum that staff will want to – and can – fill. Distrust is toxic within organizations, and employers who choose to hide information about compensation run the risk of staff thinking they are being deceptive – or worse.
3 CEOs, Your Employees Watch Your Every Move.
The CEO’s values trickle down through the organization and those messages flow through the entire organization. We give permission to everyone in the organization based on our behavior, much more than anything we ever say.
4 The New Tech Tools That Can Give All Employees a Voice
Social-enterprise tools can, as social era expert Nilfer Merchant once said, make “the 800-pound corporate gorilla act more like 800 gazelles – fast, nimble and collaborative.” She said that four years ago. Now it’s essential for corporations to finally buy in, whether they use services like Slack, HipChat, or create their own platforms to foster transparency and a better way to communicate. And, just as importantly, as a way to build purpose, community and put the entire company on the same page.
5. Why a Boss’s Appreciation Is So Crucial
Leaders who want to succeed and groom future leaders of the organization need to emphasize–and model–the importance of appreciation within the organization. While there are many ways to show appreciation, it can be as simple as saying thank you often–and meaning it.
ideas  CEOs  Coopetition  slight_edge  workplaces  appreciation  transparency  millennials  gazelles  Slack  Adam_Brandenburger  Barry_Nalebuff  toxic_behaviors 
august 2016 by jerryking
Make Algorithms Accountable
AUG. 1, 2016 | The New York Times | By JULIA ANGWIN.

An algorithm is a procedure or set of instructions often used by a computer to solve a problem. Many algorithms are secret. ....Algorithms are ubiquitous in our lives. They map out the best route to our destination and help us find new music based on what we listen to now. But they are also being employed to inform fundamental decisions about our lives:
résumés sorting, credit scoring, prediction of a defendant’s future criminality.....as we rapidly enter the era of automated decision making, we should demand more than warning labels [about the algorithms that are being used].

A better goal would be to try to at least meet, if not exceed, the accountability standard set by a president not otherwise known for his commitment to transparency, Richard Nixon: the right to examine and challenge the data used to make algorithmic decisions about us.

Algorithms should come with warning labels. Obama White House called for automated decision-making tools to be tested for fairness, and for the development of “algorithmic auditing.”
tools  automation  decision_making  algorithms  data_driven  transparency  fairness  Richard_Nixon  proprietary  accountability  biases 
august 2016 by jerryking
How to approach your own career like an entrepreneur - Fortune
1. Choose growth over profitability. Rather than focus on short-term gains, think long-term goals and what you need to get there.
2. Bet on who you want to work with, not on where. Job seekers should invest in people, not ideas. That means pick the place you’re going to work for the people you’re going to work with. They’re the ones who will train you and lead you to other opportunities when the time comes.
3. Find your special sauce. Fetishize your product-market fit. This may be one of the hardest challenges in the new economy.
4. Celebrate uncertainty. Iterate. Seek feedback and adapt. Pivot where necessary.
5. Be public. Be on Linkedin. Give away hard-won information and knowledge, you’ll get something back. Be more transparent.

Nitin Julka was 31 and working like a dog in Cleveland when he got the itch. For six years he’d been a VP of his family’s business, a $20 million company that sold IT to schools. He had moved home after getting an MBA, excited to grow the company and make a difference in educational technology. It had been a “wild ride,” but he was ready for change. “I had no idea what I wanted to do,” he says. “I just knew I wanted to do something different.”

The jobs that interested him most were in tech. He started calling friends, friends of friends, business school classmates, and even distant contacts to talk about Bay Area companies and about what professional roles he might actually qualify for. After 30 or so conversations, he made up his mind: He wanted to be a product manager at a fast-growing Silicon Valley–based startup.

This struck few as a logical or even feasible next step for Julka: “I was changing job functions, industries, and geographies. People told me you can do one of those things—not all three at once.”

But Julka is more self-aware than most. On a quarterly basis, he conducts a life assessment and reviews what he considers to be his professional competitive advantage. Among his “most unique” attributes he lists his receptiveness to feedback. Indeed, in his quest for continual improvement, he has recorded personal and professional feedback in a single, running Google doc since 2010. He reads it once a week, when prompted by a recurring calendar invite.

And so began what Julka considers the “abnormal part” of his job search: He drew up a spreadsheet of 60 target companies, a few of which he researched for 60 to 80 hours (he admits he “overinvested”). He read 10-Ks and 10-Qs and a hundred CrunchBase articles; he mined his personal and virtual connections; he enlisted a friend, a former Google programmer, to tutor him in code; and he found free online videos from which he learned UX/UI design. With his wife’s support, he gave himself five weeks in Silicon Valley—no mean feat given that he had an 18-month-old baby at home. He met with three or more people a day, prepared a 48-page set of interview notes, and rode the highs and lows of pitching himself for a job that many thought he was an odd fit for.

It ended on a high. In September 2013 he got several job offers—including one, through a contact of his business school professor, at Bizo, a startup that has since been acquired by LinkedIn LNKD .

Julka may sound like a case study in craziness, a modern-day Ben Franklin whose entrepreneurial energy and efforts cannot be easily matched. But while he exists at one extreme, he’s the prototype for what it takes to navigate one’s career these days.

The truth is, wherever you are on the corporate ladder, whatever you do for a living, you’ve got to think like you’re launching a business from the ground up.

As LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman and Ben Casnocha wrote in their zeitgeist-tapping book from 2012, The Start-Up of You, “All humans are entrepreneurs.” To accelerate your career in today’s economy, you’ve got to embrace that spirit and apply the Silicon Valley formula—“adapt to the future” and “invest in yourself”—no matter how comfortable in your job you might be.

Imagine you’re a founder. You’ve been working for days—years, really. (You can’t remember the last time you took a day off.) You’ve networked like crazy. And now, at last, you’ve landed one of those much-coveted meetings with a high-profile venture capital firm on Sand Hill Road.

the start up of you bookIt feels as though you’ve been waiting your whole life for this: You’ve prepared your slide deck, rehearsed your pitch, and honed your talking points. You’re ready to be grilled about even the finest details of your marketing and monetization strategies. You’ve gone so far as to research your VC’s hobbies. But the product you’re selling isn’t some whiz-bang app or the latest and greatest cloud-computing platform; the product is you.

Here’s where your potential backer steps in: What’s your competitive advantage, she asks? The questions come rapid-fire: What’s your addressable market? The opportunities for growth? Your five-year plan? Your 10-year plan?

You may not be used to thinking about your career in such calculating terms, but old standards like “follow your passion” get you only so far. You won’t get Series A funding, but the analogy is apt: If you are the startup, you’d better start answering to your inner VC.

“You’ve got to have a sense of purpose, authenticity, self-awareness, intellectual honesty, and the ability to navigate ambiguity,” says Hemant Taneja, managing director at General Catalyst Partners, a venture capital firm. That’s what he looks for in companies—and people—he invests in. Alan Braverman, an entrepreneur and angel investor who co-heads the Giant Pixel, a tech startup studio, speaks more bluntly: “What most people consider a safe career path, I consider falling behind.”

You don’t have to be a TaskRabbit (or a VC) to know that the world of work has changed. Technology, globalization, and one long recession—in which nearly one in six Americans reported losing a job, according to Princeton economist Henry Farber—have all disrupted old-fashioned employment. Corporations have downsized, outsourced, and rightsized. They slashed training budgets during the recession, and though that spending is coming back—up 15% in 2013, according to a Deloitte survey—corporate talent development is thought to be a dying art. “As companies see it, the incentives are just so perverse,” says Peter Cappelli, a professor of management at Wharton Business School. “Typically you train someone, and once they become useful, they’re hired away from you.” Meanwhile, the slow march of automation continues: Robots now fly planes, perform surgeries, and in some cases write news. That leaves you, dear worker, in a tight spot—whether or not you’ve got your dream job now, you’ve got to stay relevant and evolve.

That’s not as easy as it once was. The half-life of desirable skills has shortened with the hastening pace of technological change. (A Python programmer now eats the once-hot Java programmer for lunch.) Fabio Rosati, CEO of the online freelancing platform Elance-oDesk, says these dynamics are moving us from the era of employment to one of newfangled “employability.” Professionals, like the 9.3 million who find work on his site, are now being viewed as mobile, independent bundles of skills. In this universe the most adaptable talent rules the day. Increasingly, learning agility is an attribute sought in corporate leadership, says Vicki Swisher, a senior director at Korn Ferry, an executive search firm. What’s more, she says, it’s what employers are looking for in all new hires.

That agility is also mission critical for your personal enterprise (formerly known as your career path). Rather than climb a single corporate ladder like the company man of yore, you’re more likely to spend your career scaling a professional jungle gym, maneuvering between projects, jobs, companies, industries, and locales. By the reckoning of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest job-tenure survey, you’ll pivot every 4.6 years (make that three if you’re a millennial, a demographic that will dominate the workforce in 2015). To do this well requires imagination, initiative, and some guts. Much like a startup, you’re forging your way ahead in a dynamic world where there is no conventional path.

“Get comfortable with being uncomfortable,” advises Mike Abbott, a general partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, who knows as an entrepreneur and as someone whose career zigged to Microsoft, Palm, and Twitter before it zagged to venture capital. In his case, he sought discomfort. “That’s how you learn the most.”

While the ideas of a free-agent nation and personal brand building have been with us for a couple of decades, DIY-career building has gotten a big push from the digital (and old-fashioned sharing) infrastructure that fosters this independence. There’s the rise in communal workspaces like WeWork and educational alternatives like Coursera, which offers college courses online, and General Assembly, which trains workers in the most in-demand tech skills. (As Julka’s case shows, YouTube and Google can also be empowering resources.)

A slew of online platforms has made it simpler to drum up employment, from one-off gigs to full-time jobs. Professionals can peddle their services, whether it be supply-chain management or legal advice, more easily and independently too, through sites like Elance-oDesk and TrustedPeer, which sometimes cater to big companies.

The data are messy on the size and shape of this new, more independent workforce. The BLS, whose classification system dates back to 1948, counted 14.4 million self-employed Americans in April 2014. That’s a far cry from the results of a study commissioned this year by the Freelancers Union and Elance-oDesk, which put the number of freelancers—a broader category that includes temps, part-timers, and moonlighters—at 53 million, or one in three American workers. (A report on freelancers … [more]
Ben_Casnocha  customer_growth  discomforts  Elance-oDesk  free-agents  gig_economy  invest_in_yourself  it's_up_to_me  job_search  large_companies  learning_agility  Managing_Your_Career  non-routine  personal_branding  pitches  preparation  product-market_fit  readiness  Reid_Hoffman  self-assessment  self-awareness  self-employment  Silicon_Valley  skills  slight_edge  special_sauce  start_ups  torchbearers  transparency  TrustedPeer  uncertainty  value_propositions  via:enochko  WeWork 
july 2016 by jerryking
Goldman’s Tech Chief Pushes the Bank to Be More Open, Like Him - The New York Times
APRIL 1, 2016 | NYT | By NATHANIEL POPPER.

Today Goldman is trying to change not only that public image, but also some of the central tenets of its culture, like the secrecy and reliance on back-room dealings. The firm’s chief executive, Lloyd C. Blankfein, has said he wants Goldman to be thought of as a tech company — putting it in direct competition for talent with the Googles and Facebooks of the world. No one is more central to these efforts than Mr. Chavez.

Mr. Chavez, who was promoted just over two years ago to oversee the firm’s 9,000 or so computer engineers — nearly a third of the staff — is pushing the 147-year-old firm to, among other things, share more of its data and software with clients. His centerpiece project, Marquee, gives clients access to sophisticated trading data previously available only by phoning a Goldman employee.....Mr. Chavez represents broad pressures across the financial industry. The 2008 economic crisis and the regulations that followed it are forcing banks to become less opaque and more technologically savvy and efficient. This has shifted the center of power in the business away from the trading desks, where it was before the crisis, and toward the programmers and engineers — until recently dismissed as the geeks in the back office....Mr. Chavez says that if efforts like his are successful, clients will see “a very different configuration of the financial services industry than the one we have now.” Goldman will still have the chief product of a bank — money to lend and invest — but he thinks that the ways in which customers get access to that money will rely more on software and less on the bankers who traditionally delivered Goldman’s services.
CIOs  Wall_Street  Goldman_Sachs  Hispanics  transparency  financial_services  Martin_Chavez  war_for_talent  digital_savvy 
april 2016 by jerryking
Think tanks need to show us the money - The Globe and Mail
KONRAD YAKABUSKI
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Feb. 09 2015

Like Brookings, almost of all of Canada’s leading think tanks claim to be independent and non-partisan. But while none – not even the Broadbent Institute – is directly affiliated with a political party, it’s not hard to discern an identifiable political agenda in the research they produce. American think tanks, says former think-tank founder David Callahan, “often operate as the motherships of ideological movements – weaving together a jumble of values and ideas into a coherent story and actionable agenda.” You could easily say the same of most of their Canadian counterparts.
Konrad_Yakabuski  think_tanks  lobbying  Brookings  institution-building  networks  institutions  political_infrastructure  transparency  political_advocacy  policy_analysis  policy  conflicts_of_interest  policymaking 
february 2015 by jerryking
The hot, confusing mess that is digital privacy — Tech News and Analysis
By Derrick Harris
Aug. 22, 2013

It’s all about how you use it

OK, so we should regulate how companies use data rather than what they can collect. That has been a big push from the technology industry, and it certainly makes more sense than limiting what’s gathered — especially considering that most rights to gather data are granted contractually (capitalists love contracts) and it’s just so easy to collect it. But how do you regulate usage?

Even if we make companies like Google and Facebook tell users how they’re using user data, there’s still the challenge of timing. Surely, we can’t expect companies to get consent from users every time they’re experimenting with some new product or new model using our data, right? That seems like it would be a pretty big hindrance on innovation — push your product ideas into the public eye or get slammed with penalties.

Further, granting real permission is based on having all the facts. “We’re going to use your personal data for targeted advertising” is a lot different than saying “We’re going to take your age, city, site behavior and — ooh, you signed in via Twitter — Twitter account info to predict that you’re black, white, rich, poor, healthy or suffering from herpes.” If we were to mandate the latter type of disclosure, would we expect consent every time a company’s data scientists reweighted the variables in their models or found some new correlations? Could we revoke permissions because something happened and our profiles suddenly look less appealing?
privacy  permissions  data  mydata  transparency  SLAs  customer_agreements 
april 2014 by jerryking
Case Study: Edgy Ad Campaign, With Hefty Digital, Traditional PR Support, Helps the Pistachio Come Out of Its Shell
Timeframe: March - Dec. 2009

In early 2009, life wasn't all it was cracked up to be for the pistachio. In March of that year, the FDA issued a precautionary, voluntary recall for the green nut for...
product_recalls  public_relations  commodities  branding  brands  transparency  crisis_management  FDA  marketing  Lynda_Resnick  social_media  funnies  contests  virality 
december 2013 by jerryking
Dane Atkinson of SumAll, on Making Pay an Open Book - NYTimes.com
By ADAM BRYANT
Published: August 15, 2013

Dane Atkinson, chief executive of SumAll, a data analytics company, says the pay and ownership stakes of all its employees are listed for the entire staff to see
SumAll  massive_data_sets  hiring  start_ups  serial_entrepreneur  analytics  data  transparency  trustworthiness  truth-clarity 
august 2013 by jerryking
10 political commandments
10 political commandments

Re Trudeau Seeks High Ground With Ethics Policy (June 18): Lawrence Martin’s catalogue of the Liberals’ proposed reforms suggests the time may be ripe for politicians ...
transparency  accountability  Lawrence_Martin  letters_to_the_editor  rules_of_the_game  politics 
june 2013 by jerryking
Uniting for Cyberdefense - NYTimes.com
By RENÉ OBERMANN
Published: February 19, 2013

A set of basic and accepted rules-of-the-road protects our physical highways and traffic, and we have to have similar, internationally recognized rules for the information highway. We must define standards and functionalities in order to ensure a safe and coherent digital architecture. A good example is the German security standard for “smart meters” that monitor and bill power consumption.

This will not be easy for the I.T. industry. In Europe, the sheer number of Internet providers makes it difficult to find a common position. Again, transparency and information sharing is essential: Every sound effort to implement such rules and standards relies on feedback about vulnerabilities, as well as data on the quantity, quality and origin of attacks. One cannot manage a problem until one can measure it.
collaboration  cyber_security  defensive_tactics  Deutsche_Telekom  frequency_and_severity  forensics  information_sharing  metrics  network_risk  smart_meters  technical_standards  transparency  vulnerabilities 
february 2013 by jerryking
Time for China to venture out
November 8th, 2012 | The World in 2013 | Vijay Vaitheewaran.

Ask consumers around the world to name a Chinese brand, more often than not they will stare blankly. One in six people around the world use mobile telephones that relyr on kit made by the world`s largest telecoms­equipment firm, but few know of the from Shenzhen. Not one Chinese brand made the latest list of best global brands compiled by Interbrand. a consultancy.
Developing blockbuster global brands on a par with Coca-Cola will take time, but 2013 promises to be a turning-point. One reason is that after three decades of gravity-defying growth, China’s home market is at last cooling off. Easy pickings at home meant many Chinese did not need to build proper brands globally. Now, the slowdown will push many into overseas markets in quest of growth. If they are to flourish in such hypercompetitive markets, they will have to invest in brandbuilding in...though Chinese firms will venture overseas in record numbers in 2013, they will not find it easy. One reason is prejudice. Much as Iapanese and Korean firms did before them, they will need to persuade sceptical consumers that they are not peddling cheap junk. Building global brands will also require cleaning up the country’s notoriously murky corporate governance. William Brent of Weber Shandwick, a communications consultancy, argues that the quest for a global brand means that “2013 will mark the year when Chinese multinationals come face to face with transparency.” .
books  China  branding  brands  Huawei  transparency 
january 2013 by jerryking
Canada’s hazy takeover rules hurt everyone
Oct. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail |Barrie McKenna.

Following an upsurge of national angst triggered by the buyouts of Canadian resource giants Inco, Falconbridge Ltd. and Rio Tinto Alcan in 2006, Ottawa ordered up the exhaustive “Compete to Win” report. The result was the 2008 federal Competition Policy Review Panel headed by former BCE Inc. chairman Lynton (Red) Wilson, which urged the government to turn the investment review process on its head.

The Wilson panel anticipated the growing clout of state-owned investors as well as the commodities super cycle.

Mr. Wilson’s prescription was to scrap the “net benefit to Canada” test and replace it with a “national interest” benchmark used by countries such as Australia. He urged Ottawa to reverse the burden of proof on takeovers, making it the responsibility of the government to demonstrate why a deal is bad for the country, not the other way around. And the panel said the government should publicly explain the rationale for blocking or approving transactions, scrapping a regime that “does not meet contemporary standards for transparency.”...The absence of investment reciprocity or evidence that state-owned actors won’t behave like other companies both would qualify as possible reasons for saying no.
barriers_to_entry  Barrie_McKenna  FDI  SOEs  mergers_&_acquisitions  M&A  rules_of_the_game  commodities_supercycle  national_interests  competition_policy  transparency  say_"no" 
november 2012 by jerryking
Three top traits of leaders - The Globe and Mail
Harvey Schachter

Special to The Globe and Mail

Last updated Friday, Sep. 21 2012,

three top traits for leaders to emphasize as they move through the ranks: Influence over others, to sell ideas; high energy levels to accommodate the increase in time demands that occur at successive levels of leadership; and a take-charge approach, combining a more directive style that involves delegating tasks and imposing action....At the same time, the research suggests leaders must give up the following traits as they move up the ladder:

· Passive-aggressiveness: Instead of going along to avoid conflict and then lashing out, as you rise in ranks you can be more direct about what you think.

· Micro-management: You now need to focus on managing outcomes, rather than fussing about the details.

· Manipulation: You no longer have to hide your agenda and try to twist people towards your desired direction. You should lead by influence and be transparent about your goals.

· Attention to detail: This helped you before you rose to management and in the first levels of management, but as you gain a broader scope of responsibility you must think more strategically, which can be blocked if you get lost in details.
movingonup  Harvey_Schachter  leaders  personality_types/traits  detail_oriented  personal_energy  action-oriented  transparency  micro-management  passive-aggressive  think_threes  pitches 
october 2012 by jerryking
The ‘new cold war’ is an information war -
Aug. 25 2012 | The Globe and Mail | Anne-Marie Slaughter.
In the many manifestations of the ongoing and growing information war(s), the pro-freedom-of-information forces need a new weapon. A government’s banning of journalists or blocking of news and social-media sites that were previously allowed should be regarded as an early warning sign of a crisis meriting international scrutiny. The presumption should be that governments with nothing to hide have nothing to lose by allowing their citizens and internationally recognized media to report on their actions.

To give this presumption teeth, it should be included in international trade and investment agreements. Imagine if the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and regional development banks suspended financing as soon as a government pulled down an information curtain. Suppose foreign investors wrote contracts providing that the expulsion and banning of foreign journalists or widespread blocking of access to international news sources and social media constituted a sign of political risk sufficient to suspend investor obligations.

Americans say that sunlight is the best disinfectant. Citizens’ access to information is an essential tool to hold governments accountable. Government efforts to manipulate or block information should be presumed to be an abuse of power – one intended to mask many other abuses.
accountability  information_flows  information  journalists  censorship  political_risk  warning_signs  freedom_of_information  information_warfare  IMF  World_Bank  Anne-Marie_Slaughter  presumptions  transparency 
august 2012 by jerryking
Ten Laws Of The Modern World
04.19.05 | Forbes | Rich Karlgaard.

• Gilder's Law: Winner's Waste. The futurist George Gilder wrote about this a few years ago in a Forbes publication. The best business models, he said, waste the era's cheapest resources in order to conserve the era's most expensive resources. When steam became cheaper than horses, the smartest businesses used steam and spared horses. Today the cheapest resources are computer power and bandwidth. Both are getting cheaper by the year (at the pace of Moore's Law). Google (nasdaq: GOOG - news - people ) is a successful business because it wastes computer power--it has some 120,000 servers powering its search engine--while it conserves its dearest resource, people. Google has fewer than 3,500 employees, yet it generates $5 billion in (current run rate) sales.

• Ricardo's Law. The more transparent an economy becomes, the more David Ricardo's 19th-century law of comparative advantage rules the day. Then came the commercial Internet, the greatest window into comparative advantage ever invented. Which means if your firm's price-value proposition is lousy, too bad. The world knows.

• Wriston's Law. This is named after the late Walter Wriston, a giant of banking and finance. In his 1992 book, The Twilight of Sovereignty, Wriston predicted the rise of electronic networks and their chief effect. He said capital (meaning both money and ideas), when freed to travel at the speed of light, "will go where it is wanted, stay where it is well-treated...." By applying Wriston's Law of capital and talent flow, you can predict the fortunes of countries and companies.

• The Laffer Curve. In the 1970s the young economist Arthur Laffer proposed a wild idea. Cut taxes at the margin, on income and capital, and you'll get more tax revenue, not less. Laffer reasoned that lower taxes would beckon risk capital out of hiding. Businesses and people would become more productive. The pie would grow. Application of the Laffer Curve is why the United States boomed in the 1980s and 1990s, why India is rocking now and why eastern Europe will outperform western Europe.

• Drucker's Law. Odd as it seems, you will achieve the greatest results in business and career if you drop the word "achievement" from your vocabulary. Replace it with "contribution," says the great management guru Peter Drucker. Contribution puts the focus where it should be--on your customers, employees and shareholders.

• Ogilvy's Law. David Ogilvy gets my vote as the greatest advertising mind of the 20th century. The founder of Ogilvy & Mather--now part of WPP (nasdaq: WPPGY - news - people )--left a rich legacy of ideas in his books, my favorite being Ogilvy on Advertising. Ogilvy wrote that whenever someone was appointed to head an office of O&M, he would give the manager a Russian nesting doll. These dolls open in the middle to reveal a smaller doll, which opens in the middle to reveal a yet smaller doll...and so on. Inside the smallest doll would be a note from Ogilvy. It read: "If each of us hires people who are smaller than we are, we shall become a company of dwarfs. But if each of us hires people who are bigger than we are, we shall become a company of giants." Ogilvy knew in the 1950s that people make or break businesses. It was true then; it's truer today.
Rich_Karlgaard  matryoshka_dolls  Moore's_Law  Metcalfe's_Law  Peter_Drucker  Ogilvy_&_Mather  Gilder's_Law  hiring  talent  advertising_agencies  transparency  value_propositions  capital_flows  talent_flows  David_Ogilvy  inexpensive  waste  abundance  scarcity  constraints  George_Gilder 
june 2012 by jerryking
Six Things All CEOs Can Learn From Mulally | ChiefExecutive.net | Chief Executive Magazine
Six Things All CEOs Can Learn From Mulally

June 27 2011 by JP Donlon

1. Display courage in the face of adversity.
2. Focus is everything.
3. Simplify.
4. Use the Outsider Advantage.
5. Reward transparency and collaboration.
6. Stay inventive during tough times.
Alan_Mulally  simplicity  Ford  Boeing  leadership  tips  courage  innovation  transparency  collaboration  CEOs  hard_times  adversity  focus  outsiders 
november 2011 by jerryking
The China Syndrome
JULY 16, 2007 | WSJ | By JEREMY HAFT.
On average, it takes China 17 separate parties to produce a product that would take us three. Unlike Japan in the 1980s, little companies drive China's economic growth, not big ones. China's industries are composed of hundreds of thousands of tiny factories and farms -- plus traders, brokers, haulers and agents, all of whom take control of the goods and materials but add little value to the product. With every additional player in the chain, the cost, risk and time grow. Effective quality control in this environment is difficult.So is effective cost control. Despite cheap labor, making goods in China is often more expensive than in the U.S. Far from being a bottomless ATM of cheap consumer goods, China is a risky, costly and time-consuming place to do business.Yet polls show a majority of Americans believe China has mastered basic manufacturing -- and it's now barreling into our high-tech backyard. That's false. As the product recalls demonstrate, China can barely make low-value goods reliably, much less higher-value ones……To compete head-to-head with the American economy, China will have to revolutionize the very way its industries are organized. It must shake out the thousands of low-value middlemen and integrate the tiny factories into larger, more competitive companies. It must train a workforce in modern technology and business practices. And, it must instill transparency and a uniform rule of law. Such an effort could span generations…….the next century will not be led by the country that can make the cheapest copy of a spark plug. It will be led by innovators and entrepreneurs, America's unrivaled assets. Innovation -- not imitation -- will create jobs and maintain America's economic primacy in the century ahead.
China  Chinese  product_recalls  America  transparency  manufacturers  innovation  competitiveness_of_nations  low_value  middlemen  rule_of_law  entrepreneurship 
october 2011 by jerryking
Did prostate cancer kill Jack Layton?
September 12, 2011| CTV MedNews | by Dr. Lorne Brandes
Jack_Layton  cancers  prostate  transparency 
september 2011 by jerryking
Ray Dalio’s Richest and Strangest Hedge Fund
JULY 25, 2011 |: The New Yorker | by John Cassidy.
How Ray Dalio built the world’s richest and strangest hedge fund.
profile  Ray_Dalio  Bridgewater  hedge_funds  organizational_culture  transparency 
august 2011 by jerryking
World Bank Is Opening Its Treasure Chest of Data
July 2, 2011 | NYT|By STEPHANIE STROM. The World Bank’s
traditional role has been to finance specific projects that foster eco.
dvlpmnt,...it might come as a surprise that its president , Robert
Zoellick, argues that the most valuable currency of the WB isn’t its $—
it is its information. ...For > a yr, the WB has been releasing its
prized data sets, currently giving public access to more than 7,000 that
were previously available only to some 140,000 subscribers — mostly
govts & researchers, who paid for access. ...Those data sets contain
all sorts of info. about the developing world, whether workaday
economic stats — GDP, CPI & the like — or arcana like the # of women
are breast-feeding their children in rural Peru.

It is a trove unlike anything else in the world, and, it turns out,
highly valuable. For whatever its accuracy or biases, this data defines
the economic reality of billions of people and is used in making
policies & decisions that enormously impact their lives.
World_Bank  information_flows  data  databases  massive_data_sets  transparency  open_source  Robert_Zoellick  crowdsourcing  mashups  datasets  decision_making  policymaking  developing_countries 
july 2011 by jerryking
How To Lunch
May 3, 2010 | Financial Times pg. 12 | by Rhymer Rigby. How do
you make sure your working lunch works?
What is the point of a business lunch? Unlike a meeting, sitting down
and breaking bread with someone gives them a chance to open up, relax
and make a real connection." "Lunch is more discursive and an
opportunity to talk more broadly," "A business lunch turns a
transactional relationship into something deeper."tell people why you're
inviting them to lunch," says Ms Ellis. "Is it to discuss strategy or
to thank them for putting business your way? If you don't tell them, it
can be awkward."
ProQuest  etiquette  networking  howto  restaurants  lunchtime  personal_connections  Communicating_&_Connecting  transactional_relationships  candour  transparency 
may 2010 by jerryking
A Message to Wall Street's Fabulous Fabs
April 22, 2010 | BusinessWeek | By Michael Lewis. Goldman
will survive, but the expectations have changed. "Here, for a start, is
what the world beyond Wall Street is entitled to:

Full knowledge of the inner workings of your proprietary trading desk.
In particular, the moment-to-moment dealings of your correlations
traders from late 2004, when they first exploited AIG's (AIG) idiotic
willingness to sell cheap insurance on pools of subprime mortgage loans,
until the end of 2007, when they would have taken most of their profits
from the total collapse of the subprime bond markets "
Goldman_Sachs  Michael_Lewis  transparency 
april 2010 by jerryking
Fund Seeks to Demystify Quants - WSJ.com
APRIL 3, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By JENNY STRASBURG.
Investors in general are suspicious of secretive strategies following
investment scams including the Madoff fraud. For Roc Capital Management,
run by 46-year-old Arvind Raghunathan who has a doctorate in computer
science, disclosing more details about investments and operations has
helped woo investors
quants  hedge_funds  India  Outsourcing  scams  transparency  investors  quantitative  demystification  disclosure 
april 2010 by jerryking
Justice not seen - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 03, 2010 | Globe and Mail .China should open its courtroom
door, on the grounds of general principles of procedural and
substantive justice, as well on the narrower ground of giving confidence
to foreign citizens and companies that they will be treated fairly.
Australia  China  courtroom_process  editorials  transparency  confidence 
april 2010 by jerryking
Patrick Lencioni on How to be a 'Naked' Consultant - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 24, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By MATTHEW RIVERA.
"...consultants need to admit their mistakes and call attention to
problems, even when it makes them look bad. By doing so, he says,
they'll gain more than they lose. It's an approach he calls "getting
naked," and he's written a book about it."
Patrick_Lencioni  management_consulting  transparency 
march 2010 by jerryking
The data deluge
Feb 27, 2010 | The Economist. Vol. 394, Iss. 8671; pg. 11 |
Anonymous. Everywhere you look, the quantity of information in the
world is soaring. According to one estimate, mankind created 150
exabytes (billion gigabytes) of data in 2005. This year, it will create
1,200 exabytes. Merely keeping up with this flood, and storing the bits
that might be useful, is difficult enough. Analysing it, to spot
patterns and extract useful information, is harder still. Even so, the
data deluge is already starting to transform business, government,
science and everyday life (see our special report in this issue). It has
great potential for good--as long as consumers, companies and
governments make the right choices about when to restrict the flow of
data, and when to encourage it. Plucking the diamond from the waste
ProQuest  data_driven  data_mining  competingonanalytics  transparency  massive_data_sets 
march 2010 by jerryking
Uncle Sam In Your Pocket - Dual Perspectives - Portfolio.com
Feb 17 2009 | Portfolio.com |by Sarah Lai Stirland for Wired.com |

: The ultimate vision is of a government that operates like a suite of iPhone apps.
XML  multiple_formats  transparency  data  government_2.0 
march 2009 by jerryking
How Charities Can Make Themselves More Open - WSJ.com
DECEMBER 10, 2007 WSJ article by SALLY BEATTY
* Charities and foundations should provide detailed information on their
Web sites -- everything from board members and their bios; problems
encountered trying to achieve their goals; how they measure their
effectiveness; embrace rigorous forms of evaluation and report their
findings to the public.
* Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University
assessments_&_evaluations  charities  donors  effectiveness  foundations  philanthropy  transparency 
february 2009 by jerryking

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