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jerryking : transportation   53

Collaborative transport model aims to disrupt the disrupters
January 14, 2019 | Financial Times | by John Thornhill.

Liad Itzhak, head of mobility at Here Technologies, is certainly planning on it. His parent company, majority owned by the German carmakers BMW, Audi, and Daimler, has created a “mobility marketplace” that aims to tackle the problems of fragmented transport services, including the ride-hailing companies. “We are here to disrupt the disrupters,” he says.

More than 500 service providers, with 1.4m vehicles, have joined Here’s mobility marketplace in 350 cities — although it is not yet operational everywhere. At the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas last week, Mr Itzhak announced the expansion of the company’s services and the launch of its SoMo app.

Here’s model differs from traditional ride-hailing companies in two critical respects. First, it acts as a platform for all collaborative transport services, public or private, ranging from bike rentals to taxi firms to bus companies. It will recommend the optimal route for travelling from A to B, even if that means walking, rather than highlighting the one that generates the most revenue for any company. “We are the first and only one to create a neutral global mobility marketplace,” Mr Itzhak says.

Second, it is attempting to introduce a social networking element to transport services. Its SoMo, or social mobility, app will connect people who are going to the same destination at the same time for the same purpose. So, for example, parents taking their kids to football will be better able to co-ordinate travel.
disruption  platforms  ride_sharing  transportation 
january 2019 by jerryking
We are still waiting for the robot revolution
2017 | Financial Times | Tim Harford.

“Our chief economic problem right now isn’t that the robots are taking our jobs, it’s that the robots are slacking off. “

Or at least — it should. Our chief economic problem right now isn’t that the robots are taking our jobs, it’s that the robots are slacking off. We suffer from slow productivity growth; the symptoms are not lay-offs but slow-growing economies and stagnant wages. In advanced economies, total factor productivity growth — a measure of how efficiently labour and capital are being used to produce goods and services — was around 2 per cent a year in the 1960s, when the ATM was introduced. Since then, it has averaged closer to 1 per cent a year; since the financial crisis it has been closer to zero. Labour productivity, too, has been low.

Plenty of jobs, but lousy productivity: imagine an economy that was the exact opposite of one where the robots took over, and it would look very much like ours. Why? Tempting as it may be to blame the banks, a recent working paper by John Fernald, Robert Hall and others argues that productivity growth stalled before the financial crisis, not afterwards: the promised benefits of the IT revolution petered out by around 2006. Perhaps the technology just isn’t good enough; perhaps we haven’t figured out how to use it. In any case, results have been disappointing.

There is always room for the view that the productivity boom is imminent. Michael Mandel and Bret Swanson, business economists, argue in their policy paper that we are starting to find digitally driven efficiencies in physical industries such as energy, construction, transport, and retail. If this happens, Silicon Valley-style innovation will ripple through the physical economy. If.
Tim_Harford  artificial_intelligence  productivity  automation  economists  efficiencies  energy  construction  transportation  retailers  robotics  physical_economy  data_driven 
august 2017 by jerryking
Toronto’s Pearson airport plans massive transit hub - The Globe and Mail
BILL CURRY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 14, 2017

The airport authority has been gradually building support for the idea of establishing Pearson as a second major transit hub – after Union Station – in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area. Regional mayors and the Ontario government announced their support for the idea at a news conference in April. In May, Pearson and 10 other airports announced the Southern Ontario Airport Network, which is based in part on shifting smaller regional air traffic away from Pearson as it focuses on larger international flights. Improved transit connections to Pearson are a key part of that plan.

The GTAA has estimated in January that the total cost of the project is at least $11.2-billion. The plan has six transit components, five of which involve extending existing or planned transit lines – such as the Eglinton LRT and Finch LRT – so that they connect to the airport. The most expensive aspect is a contribution to a high-speed rail line that would run from Union Station to the airport and on to Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, London, and possibly as far as Windsor.
airports  GTAA  transit  hubs  GTA  infrastructure  high-speed_rail  Pearson_International  YYZ  transportation  terminals  accessibility  Mississauga  Metrolinx  HSR 
july 2017 by jerryking
The End of Car Ownership - WSJ
By Tim Higgins
June 20, 2017

Thanks to ride sharing and the looming introduction of self-driving vehicles, the entire model of car ownership is being upended—and very soon may not look anything like it has for the past century.

Drivers, for instance, may no longer be drivers, relying instead on hailing a driverless car on demand, and if they do decide to buy, they will likely share the vehicle—by renting it out to other people when it isn’t in use.

Auto makers, meanwhile, already are looking for ways to sustain their business as fewer people make a long-term commitment to a car.

And startups will spring up to develop services that this new ownership model demands—perhaps even create whole new industries around self-driving cars and ride sharing.

**Drivers: No more permanent arrangements**
The business of ride sharing may take on some new forms. Startups such as Los Angeles-based Faraday Future envision selling subscriptions to a vehicle (e.g. a certain number of hours a day, on a regular schedule for a fixed price).....Other companies are experimenting with the idea of allowing drivers to access more than just one kind of vehicle through a subscription.....Elon Musk has hinted that he’s preparing to create a network of Tesla owners that could rent out their self-driving cars to make money....Companies are already looking at how to market vehicles to overcome some of the possible psychological resistance to nonownership. Waymo, the self-driving tech unit of Google parent Alphabet Inc., has begun public trials of self-driving minivans in Phoenix for select users, with the eventual goal of testing them with hundreds of families.

**Big auto makers: Making peace with on-demand services**
As a result of both driverless cars and fleets of robot taxis, sales of conventionally purchased automobiles may likely drop. What’s more, because autonomous cars will likely be designed to be on the road longer with easily upgradable or replaceable parts, the results could be devastating to auto makers that have built businesses around two-car households buying new vehicles regularly. Currently, cars get replaced every 60 months on average...to get drivers to buy a vehicle of their own is to help owners rent out their vehicles,....GM is hedging all bets, investing in autonomous vehicles, Lyft, a car sharing service (Maven) and allowing Cadillac customers the ability to subscribe to ownership.

**New businesses: Helping to power a new industry**
....Autonomous vehicles could ultimately free up more than 250 million hours of consumers’ commuting time a year, unlocking a new so-called passenger economy, .....turn away from using the exterior of the vehicle as a selling point and focusing on making the interior as comfortable and loaded with features as possible.... turning cars into living rooms on wheels:.....Design firms will also cook up features designed to ease people into the practice of sharing rides regularly (with strangers).....allowing cars recognize to passengers’ digital profiles and become more responsive to their needs (caledaring, eating habits, etc.)....Existing industries may change to support an autonomous, shared future. For instance, the alcohol industry might see a rise in drinks consumed weekly with customers not having to worry about driving home,....Managing autonomous car fleets may be a new line of business for dealerships
automotive_industry  automobile  on-demand  autonomous_vehicles  end_of_ownership  Waymo  Tesla  sharing_economy  ride_sharing  start_ups  transportation  ownership  accessibility  Zoox  dealerships  Lyft  Maven  Reachnow  Getaround  subscriptions  Faraday  passenger_economy  connected_cars 
june 2017 by jerryking
How Glencore AG became a giant in the global agriculture trade - The Globe and Mail
ERIC REGULY
ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
THE GLOBE AND MAIL
LAST UPDATED: WEDNESDAY, MAY 03, 2017

Interested in acquisitions, Glencore AG has accumulated an extensive network of grain assets around the world, and has no plans of stopping
Eric_Reguly  Glencore  soybeans  CPPIB  Argentina  ADM  Bunge  Cargill  Louis_Dreyfus  oilseeds  Viterra  agriculture  growth  opportunities  Rotterdam  grains  logistics  storage  transportation  trading  agribusiness  supply_chains  Marc_Rich 
may 2017 by jerryking
Pearson airport hub a fitting project for Canada Infrastructure Bank: Metrolinx CEO - The Globe and Mail
BILL CURRY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Apr. 09, 2017

In recent months, Pearson airport officials have been promoting a plan to raise billions for regional transit connections, including the possibility of a high-speed rail link through southwestern Ontario. A report that has not yet been released to the public estimates that private capital could help fund more than $12-billion worth of new transit, including a $6-billion high-speed rail line connecting Toronto and Windsor. One option to fund the projects would be to partially privatize the airport.

“What Pearson airport is proposing is a really important way to start to think about how do we build out the connectivity between Pearson, the rest of the transit and transportation network and the Greater Toronto and Hamilton area,”
airports  Toronto  infrastructure  hubs  high-speed_rail  transit  transportation  Mississauga  Metrolinx  Pearson_International  GTAA  YYZ  travel  terminals  accessibility  southwestern_Ontario  HSR 
april 2017 by jerryking
Toronto aims to use data for traffic insight - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE - URBAN TRANSPORTATION REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 02, 2015
Toronto  data  transportation  hackathons  analytics  traffic_congestion  John_Tory  GPS  location_based_services  LBMA 
october 2015 by jerryking
Public transit and the rush-hour commute now federal issues - The Globe and Mail
CAMPBELL CLARK
Public transit and the rush-hour commute now federal issues
SUBSCRIBERS ONLY
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Apr. 27 2015
transit  GTA  transportation  Milton  traffic_congestion  infrastructure  GO  public_transit  rush-hour  commuting 
april 2015 by jerryking
Wynne reveals details of massive Toronto-region rail expansion plan - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE - URBAN TRANSPORTATION REPORTER
Barrie — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 17 2015

The Ontario government has rolled out details on a huge expansion of GO rail service, a $13.5-billion investment that leaves little money for other transit projects around the region and falls short of earlier promises.

More frequent service with electricity-powered trains across much of the Toronto-area rail network was a Liberal campaign pledge last year, and will be funded in part by the sale of a stake in the utility Hydro One.

“We’re going to make massive improvements across the GO system,” Premier Kathleen Wynne said on Friday at a Barrie rail station, where she and Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca started to spell out what this will mean.

GO Transit service will start ramping up this year. At the end of five years, nearly 700 more trains will be running each week, an increase of about 40 per cent in capacity on weekdays, most at off-peak times. Weekend service will jump by more than 140 per cent.

Among the other details revealed on Friday was that it will take seven or eight years to electrify the GO corridors Toronto Mayor John Tory needs for his SmartTrack transit plan. ....The province has been promising regional express rail (RER) – the shorthand for changing GO from a largely commuter service into frequent, two-way electrified service – for more than a year. Ms. Wynne promised in a speech to the Toronto Region Board of Trade last April to “phase in electric train service every 15 minutes on all GO lines that we own.”
transportation  DRL  Kathleen_Wynne  GTA  GO  transit  growth  public_transit  expansions  RER  Hydro_One 
april 2015 by jerryking
Toronto to use big data to help reduce traffic congestion - The Globe and Mail
Apr. 07 2015 | The Globe and Mail | OLIVER MOORE - URBAN TRANSPORTATION REPORTER

Toronto is creating a “big data” traffic team as the city tries to manage congestion better by learning what is actually happening on its streets.....The push is a start toward filling that vacuum of information. The city has released a job posting for someone to lead the data unit and will spend the rest of the year deciding what they want to learn. A “hackathon” in September will let people come in, look at the available data and see what they can do with it.

Big data has become a buzz phrase in traffic circles as smartphones and GPS units make it easier to track people’s movements. But in most places, the promise looms larger than the reality. Many cities are still trying to figure out how to turn the flood of data into useful information.
massive_data_sets  traffic_congestion  Toronto  John_Tory  transportation  analytics  data  information_vacuum 
april 2015 by jerryking
Should Toronto and Vancouver bury their traffic problems? - The Globe and Mail
IAN MERRINGER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Sep. 18 2014,
tunnels  Toronto  transportation 
september 2014 by jerryking
Toronto's summertime roadwork fest the start of a noisier – but sounder – future - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 18 2014

Bloor Street West is getting new sidewalks and asphalt. Dundas and Spadina is being dug up for track and water-main work. Construction fencing is going in and heavy equipment setting up on Eglinton Avenue for the Crosstown light-rail transit project. Then, of course, there is the Gardiner Expressway, now in the midst of a massive rehabilitation that often slows traffic to a crawl even more snail-like than usual. With contractors hurrying to finish projects for next year’s Pan American Games as well, it is feeling like the worst construction season in years.
Eglinton_Crosstown  summertime  Toronto  infrastructure  transit  TTC  congestion  transportation  Metrolinx  traffic_congestion 
july 2014 by jerryking
Uber’s Real Challenge: Leveraging the Network Effect - NYTimes.com
JUNE 13, 2014
Continue reading the main story
Neil Irwin

The question for Uber as a business boils down to two words: network effects. That’s the concept in which users of a service benefit from the fact that everybody else uses the service as well. It isn’t much use being the only person to own a fax machine, or the only person to show up at a stock exchange. Things like these become more valuable the more widely they are embraced. Network effects are the key to the wild profitability of a firm like Microsoft; Windows and Office are hard to displace, even if a competitor offers a better, cheaper product, because Microsoft products are entrenched as an industry standard....The billion-dollar question is whether Uber’s model for offering transportation services has some of the same network effects as those of great information industry monopolies (Microsoft, Google), or is more like, say, the travel website business, a brutally competitive industry of middlemen.

Uber is itself a middleman, of course. On one side, it recruits drivers, who typically own or lease their cars. On the other side, it markets to consumers who may want a ride. Then it matches them up; the consumer orders a car, a driver accepts the request, the service is provided, and Uber charges the consumer’s credit card. It keeps a 20 percent commission for itself and pays the rest to the driver....The task facing Uber is not just to overcome the hurdles and make ride-sharing a multibillion dollar industry. It’s to try to entrench the advantages it has from being first: continually refining its offerings to have the best possible user experience, the best data analytics to ensure that people can get a car when they need one, and not to be greedy with regard to its commission, lest it be all the more inviting a target for rivals. It’s no easy job, but nobody said building a company worth $18 billion is.
Uber  network_effects  sharing_economy  middlemen  ride-sharing  platforms  first_movers  transportation  two-sided_markets  match-making 
june 2014 by jerryking
With Uber’s Cars, Maybe We Don’t Need Our Own - NYTimes.com
JUNE 11, 2014 | NYT |Farhad Manjoo.

Uber is anything but trivial. It could well transform transportation the way Amazon has altered shopping — by using slick, user-friendly software and mountains of data to completely reshape an existing market, ultimately making many modes of urban transportation cheaper, more flexible and more widely accessible to people across the income spectrum.

Uber could pull this off by accomplishing something that has long been seen as a pipe dream among transportation scholars: It has the potential to decrease private car ownership....There’s only one problem with taxis: In most American cities, Dr. King found, there just aren’t enough of them. Taxi service is generally capped by regulation, and in many cities the number of taxis has not been increased substantially in decades, despite a vast increase in the number of miles people travel. In some places this has led to poor service: In the San Francisco survey, for instance, one out of four residents rated the city’s taxi service as “terrible.”

Ride-sharing services solve this problem in two ways. First, they substantially increase the supply of for-hire vehicles on the road, which puts downward pressure on prices. As critics say, Uber and other services do this by essentially evading regulations that cap taxis. This has led to intense skirmishes with regulators and questions over who has oversight to maintain the safety of the blossoming new industry.
Uber  sharing_economy  taxis  transportation  Farhad_Manjoo  ownership  end_of_ownership  on-demand  accessibility  automobile 
june 2014 by jerryking
The Weekend Interview with Travis Kalanick: The Transportation Trustbuster - WSJ.com
January 25, 2013 | WSJ | By ANDY KESSLER.
Travis Kalanick: The Transportation Trustbuster
Travis Kalanick, co-founder of Uber, talks about how he's bringing limo service to the urban masses—and how he learned to beat the taxi cartel and city hall.... is a hot San Francisco startup that already has 25 outposts around the world for its simple, seductive service: on-demand transportation. With an iPhone or Android app, you call up the Uber map, spot an available town car or taxi, and summon it with a click. The fare and tip for a town car, or limo, is maybe 50% higher than for a regular taxi ride and paid for through the service.
transportation  disruption  San_Francisco  Andy_Kessler  urban  Uber  mobile_applications  on-demand  start_ups  sharing_economy 
january 2013 by jerryking
Robert Moses, Pedal Pusher? | By Thomas J. Campanella - WSJ.com
June 25, 2012 | WSJ | by THOMAS J. CAMPANELLA.

The rollout this summer of New York's first bicycle-share program will be the most visible achievement yet of the city's capable commissioner of transportation, Janette Sadik-Khan. Funded by Citigroup and Mastercard, the Citi Bike System will make available 10,000 bicycles for rent and return at any of 600 stations throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. With Citi Bike, Ms. Sadik-Khan has spun a gossamer new transportation web across much of the city, a healthful and sustainable alternative to getting around by car.
New_York_City  urban  urban_planning  bicycles  rentals  Citigroup  Mastercard  Robert_Moses  transportation  rollouts  sharing_economy  bike_sharing 
august 2012 by jerryking
The Megabus Effect - BusinessWeek
April 7, 2011, 5:00PM EST
The Megabus Effect
After decades of decline, the bus is the U.S.'s fastest-growing way to
travel, led by curbside service from Megabus, BoltBus, and others

By Ben Austen
buses  transportation  transit 
april 2011 by jerryking
How Canadian 'science fiction' drives subway trains abroad
Aug. 19, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Jeff Gray. ",Fighting for
business around the world from a base in Canada has several advantages,
Mr. Kahn says. For one thing, governments support technology and
innovation: Thales received a $12.8-million grant from Ontario last year
to integrate green energy-saving technology into its systems.

But the talent pool in Toronto is also a major advantage, adds Mr. Kahn,
who came from Thales’s aviation division, based in Italy. Not only is
Toronto awash in technical expertise, he says, its diversity is a secret
weapon. "
beyondtheU.S.  diversity  railways  special_sauce  state-as-facilitator  Thales  Toronto  transit  transportation  TTC 
august 2010 by jerryking
Wal-Mart Asks Suppliers to Cede Control of Deliveries
May 21, 2010 | Businessweek | By Chris Burritt, Carol Wolf and Matthew Boyle
Wal-Mart  logistics  transportation  supply_chains 
august 2010 by jerryking
Toronto congestion costs Canada $3.3-billion: OECD
Nov. 19, 2009 | The Globe and Mail | by Brodie Fenlon. More
should be done to capitalize on immigrants' international networks in
order to expand Canada's global trade. Cities outside Toronto need to
increase investment in affordable and rental housing that serves
newcomers.
OECD  Toronto  congestion  transit  transportation  planning  immigrants  traffic_congestion 
december 2009 by jerryking
Buggy maker bounces to success
15-Jul-2008 Financial Times By Michael Steen profiling Michael
Steen, founder of Bugaboo, a designer and manufacturer of baby
pushhairs.
entrepreneurship  design  transportation  children  industrial_design  start_ups  infants 
february 2009 by jerryking
Transit City 2050
Reader Ryan Felix's subway map, which he describes as a
"fantasy map of the TTC" in 2050. Felix says it was "created in hope to
influence people to become pro-transit, and to give a vision that
Toronto can have a world-class transit system." The lines depicted on
the map––sixteen total––turn Toronto's subway coverage into a sprawling
set of lines that more closely resembles New York's system (or our
Transit City on steroids), with stops everywhere imaginable––the Ontario
Science Centre, Trinity Bellwoods, Sherway Gardens, Pearson
International Airport, and Ontario Place, to name a few.
public_transit  TTC  transportation  transit  mapping  fantasies  Pearson_International 
january 2009 by jerryking
City may fast-track relief line
Jan. 29, 2009 National Post article by Allison Hanes on the
prospect of adding a "downtown relief line" to the current TTC
footprint.
TTC  mapping  transportation  transit  public_transit  DRL 
january 2009 by jerryking

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