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20 Brutal Truths About Life No One Wants to Admit
SEP 7, 2016 | Inc.com | By Matthew Jones.

1. You're going to die and you have no idea when.
Stop pretending that you're invincible. Acknowledge the fact of your own mortality, and then start structuring your life in a more meaningful way.

2. Everyone you love is going to die, and you don't know when.
This truth may be saddening at first, but it also gives you permission to make amends with past difficulties and re-establish meaningful relationships with important figures in your life.

3. Your material wealth won't make you a better or happier person.
Even if you're one of the lucky ones who achieves his or her materialistic dreams, money only amplifies that which was already present.

4. Your obsession with finding happiness is what prevents its attainment.
Happiness is always present in your life--it's just a matter of connecting to it and allowing it to flow through you that's challenging.

5. Donating money does less than donating time.
Giving your time is a way to change your perception and create a memory for yourself and others that will last forever.

6. You can't make everyone happy, and if you try, you'll lose yourself.
Stop trying to please, and start respecting your values, principles, and autonomy.

7. You can't be perfect, and holding yourself to unrealistic standards creates suffering.
Many perfectionists have unrelenting inner critics that are full of so much rage and self-hate that it tears them apart inside. Fight back against that negative voice, amplify your intuition, and start challenging your unrealistic standards.

8. Your thoughts are less important than your feelings and your feelings need acknowledgment.
Intellectually thinking through your problems isn't as helpful as expressing the feelings that create your difficulties in the first place.

9. Your actions speak louder than your words, so you need to hold yourself accountable.
Be responsible and take actions that increase positivity and love.

10. Your achievements and successes won't matter on your death bed.
When your time has come to transition from this reality, you won't be thinking about that raise; you'll be thinking about the relationships you've made--so start acting accordingly.

11. Your talent means nothing without consistent effort and practice.
Some of the most talented people in the world never move out from their parent's basement.

12. Now is the only time that matters, so stop wasting it by ruminating on the past or planning the future.
You can't control the past, and you can't predict the future, and trying to do so only removes you from the one thing you can control--the present.

13. Nobody cares how difficult your life is, and you are the author of your life's story.
Stop looking for people to give you sympathy and start creating the life story you want to read.

14. Your words are more important than your thoughts, so start inspiring people.
Words have the power to oppress, hurt, and shame, but they also have the power to liberate and inspire--start using them more wisely.

15. Investing in yourself isn't selfish. It's the most worthwhile thing you can do.
You have to put on your own gas mask to save the person sitting right next to you.

16. It's not what happens, it's how you react that matters.
Train yourself to respond in a way that leads to better outcomes.

17. You need to improve your relationships to have lasting happiness.
Relationships have a greater impact on your wellbeing and happiness than your income or your occupation, so make sure you give your relationship the attention and work it deserves.

18. Pleasure is temporary and fleeting, so stop chasing fireworks and start building a constellation. Don't settle for an ego boost right now when you can delay gratification and experience deeper fulfillment.

19. Your ambition means nothing without execution--it's time to put in the work.
If you want to change the world, then go out there and do it!

20. Time is your most valuable asset--you need to prioritize how you spend it.
accountability  affirmations  autonomy  consistency  delayed_gratification  efforts  emotional_mastery  execution  good_enough  gut_feelings  happiness  hard_truths  invest_in_yourself  living_in_the_moment  mindfulness  mortality  mybestlife  no_sob_stories  practice  principles  priorities  relationships  serving_others  truth-telling  values  volunteering 
12 weeks ago by jerryking
What would Plato make of Boris Johnson?
June 22nd 2019 | the Economist | by Bagehot.

Classics (Literae Humaniores) is a wide-ranging degree devoted to the study of the literature, history, philosophy, languages and archaeology of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. It is one of the most interdisciplinary of all degrees, and offers the opportunity to study these two foundational ancient civilisations and their reception in modern times. The degree also permits students to take extensive options in modern philosophy......

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++Mr Johnson’s failure to get a first continues to annoy him intensely—and to delight many of his rivals. But in truth it doesn’t matter a jot: the world is full of failures who got firsts, and successes who missed out. The really interesting question is not whether Mr Johnson’s results reveal some great intellectual weakness. It is what light the subject of his studies can throw on his qualifications to be prime minister. The classics corpus is full of meditations on the qualities that make for a good leader. And no classical author thought more profoundly about the subject than Plato, the philosopher who was put at the heart of Oxford’s classics syllabus by Balliol’s greatest master, Benjamin Jowett. What would Plato have made of the classicist who appears destined to be Balliol’s fourth prime minister since 1900?.....In “The Republic”, Plato argued that the most important qualities in a statesman were truthfulness and expertise. A good statesman will “never willingly tolerate an untruth”. (“Is it possible to combine in the same character a love of wisdom and a love of falsehood?” one of Plato’s characters asks. “Quite impossible,” comes the reply.) He will spend his life studying everything that he needs to make him a good captain of the ship of state—“the seasons of the year, the sky, the stars, the winds and other professional subjects”. .......By contrast, Plato argued, the surest signs of a bad leader are narcissism and self-indulgence. The poor statesman is an eloquent flatterer, who relies on his ability to entertain the masses with speeches and comic turns, but doesn’t bother to develop a coherent view of the world. Plato was particularly vitriolic about the scions of the upper classes who are offered the opportunity to study philosophy while young but don’t apply themselves, because they think they are so talented that they needn’t earn their place at the top table.......“The Republic” is haunted by the fear that democracies eventually degenerate into tyrannies. Democracy is the most alluring form of government: “the diversity of its characters, like the different colours in a patterned dress, make it look very attractive.” But it is inherently unstable. Citizens are so consumed by pleasure-seeking that they beggar the economy; so hostile to authority that they ignore the advice of experts; and so committed to liberty that they lose any common purpose......As democracies collapse under the pressure of their contradictions, panicked citizens look for salvation in a demagogue. These are men who love power, but cannot control their own desires for “holidays and dinners and parties and girlfriends and so on”. Plato calls them the “most wretched of men because of the disorder raging within them”. Citizens are so consumed by fear that they think these wretches have magical abilities to solve the country’s problems and restore proper order. Demagogues get their start by “taking over a particularly obedient mob”, before seizing control of the country. But the more power they acquire the worse things become, “for the doctor removes the poison and leaves the healthy elements in the body, while the tyrant does the opposite.”

The shadow on the wall
Democracies have proved more durable than Plato imagined. And his cure for the problems of democracy—the rule of philosopher-kings, who are expected to hold their wives and children in common—is eccentric to put it mildly. But he is right that character matters. Politicians can change their advisers or their policies, but character is sticky. He is also right that democracies can suddenly give way to populist authoritarianism...... The best way to prepare for a Johnson premiership is to re-read “The Republic”, hoping Plato is wrong but preparing for the fact that he may be right
Boris_Johnson  character_traits  contradictions  demagoguery  democracies  Greek  humanities  leaders  leadership  liberal_arts  opposing_actions  Oxford  pairs  philosophers  Plato  politicians  Romans  statesmen  truth-telling  United_Kingdom 
july 2019 by jerryking
Quotation about lying
"If you can't lie no better than that, you might as well tell the truth" - Delbert McClinton
lying  truth-telling  quotes 
february 2019 by jerryking
After 20 Years of Financial Turmoil, a Columnist’s Last Shot - The New York Times
By GRETCHEN MORGENSON NOV. 10, 2017

For the past 20 years or so, as a business columnist for The New York Times, I’ve had a front-row seat for bull and bear markets, scandals, crises and management mischief.

But I am leaving The Times, and this is my last shot at Fair Game. So it seems a fitting moment to look back at what’s changed and what hasn’t in the financial world, for better or worse.

In addition to a string of garden-variety banking and business scandals, four seismic financial events occurred during my time as a columnist: the collapse of the Long-Term Capital Management hedge fund in 1998, the bursting of the dot-com bubble in 2000, the accounting scandals of Enron in 2001 and WorldCom in 2002, and the mother of them all — the mortgage debacle — in 2008. That one brought world economies to the precipice and wiped out Lehman Brothers and a raft of troubled banks.

......“Sarbanes-Oxley came into effect 15 years ago, and there have been fewer accounting scandals and more accountability,”...It’s too bad that the mortgage crisis six years later didn’t result in heightened accountability.

Here’s another sign of progress: Believe it or not, corporate directors are more active in their oversight than they used to be. Egregious board practices and chummy appointments are less common......Something else that hasn’t changed over the decades is analyst and investor reliance on companies’ creative earnings calculations. These figures, which do not conform to generally accepted accounting practices, typically exclude costs that companies incur in their operations.....Inventive earnings calculations, while more prevalent today, were very popular in the lead-up to the dot-com crash. Back then, analysts valued companies based on imaginative, nonfinancial metrics like the number of page views a retail website received or the percentage of “engaged shoppers” visiting a site. ....My search for truths on Wall Street and elsewhere over the years has sometimes raised hackles. That’s to the good. It wasn’t my job to be part of a company’s spin machine.
financial_communications  farewells  NYT  women  retrospectives  Wall_Street  seismic_shifts  LTCM  bubbles  scandals  SOX  truth-telling  boards_&_directors_&_governance 
november 2017 by jerryking
Bridgewater Founder Ray Dalio’s Next Investment
Oct. 13, 2017 | WSJ | By Alexandra Wolfe.

Ray Dalio, founder of Bridgewater Associates, believes in radical truthfulness. He lives by a mélange of maxims about being transparent and embracing reality. “Don’t filter.” “Don’t treat all opinions as equally valuable.” “Don’t ‘pick your battles.’ Fight them all.”

New book, “Principles: Life and Work,” a new 592-page tome about how to succeed. Truth is “the essential foundation for producing good outcomes.” He says it’s also the foundation on which he built Bridgewater, which manages $160 billion.
Ray_Dalio  Bridgewater  hedge_funds  values  truth-telling  transparency  tough_love  books 
october 2017 by jerryking
Unless You’re Oprah, ‘Be Yourself’ Is Terrible Advice. - The New York Times
Adam Grant JUNE 4, 2016
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authenticity  sincerity  advice  truth-telling  effectiveness  Adam_Grant 
february 2017 by jerryking
Beware of linearity: The shortest distance to your future may not be a straight line - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Dec. 09, 2016

linearity – dominates our thinking as we tackle problems. “Western thinkers are so habituated to thinking in terms of linear models that we allow them to inform not just what we think, but the fundamentals of how we think....Linearity is a critical and – apparently – inherent part of our cultural DNA....It’s not easy to forsake linearity...it’s essential to guard against slavishly following its tantalizing direction. Start by reading trade journals from another industry or studying a topic you have no interest in. Look for the less obvious interconnections around you. Think like a songwriter: Choruses and bridges signal a break with the preceding verse or the patterns that come before. But a true bridge, unlike a chorus, never repeats. They urge you to look for bridge moments rather than assume past is prologue.
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Leaders are supposed to tell people the truth rather than what they want to hear. But fact checkers found Mr. Trump consistently at odds with the truth. And his supporters didn’t seem to care, assuming leaders lie anyway. TV host Stephen Colbert used the term “truthiness” to cover believing something that feels true even if it isn’t supported by fact. Says Fowler: “I wonder if truth-telling matters when people are interested in bigger issues?”
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One of the highly touted productivity approaches is to tackle your most important thing (MIT) at the start of the day. Get it done before the chaos of the day overwhelms you.

But productivity writer Cal Newport, a Georgetown University computer science professor, feels the approach is insufficient – calling it “amateur ball” while the professionals play a more textured game.

The problem is that it implicitly concedes that most of your day is out of your control. But someone who plans every minute of their day and every day of their week will inevitably accomplish far more high-value work than someone who identifies only a single daily objective. The key, he feels, is to put enough buffers in your day to handle the unplanned stuff that hits you. With those slices of times and a spirit of adaptability you will find your work life not as unpredictable as you assume.
early_risers  linearity  Harvey_Schachter  thinking  humility  Donald_Trump  unplanned  unforeseen  buffering  GTD  productivity  discontinuities  nonlinear_systems  randomness  interconnections  Jim_Collins  truthiness  truth-telling  slack_time  adaptability  overwhelmed  time-management  unexpected  Cal_Newport  straight-lines  bridging  non-obvious 
december 2016 by jerryking
Conservatives can only win if they own up to their weaknesses - The Globe and Mail
BRUCE ANDERSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jul. 09, 2015

Losing political campaigns. They are, the cup half-full people say, learning moments.

Each campaign has its own dynamics; losers lose for different reasons. The lessons from a defeat aren’t always portable. But if there’s one lesson that should only be learned once it is this: If there’s a chance you’re going to lose, lose with your eyes open. Get a handle on what’s going wrong, and try everything you can to turn things around.

It sounds obvious. Shouldn’t have to be said. But you’d be amazed.

Political parties are prisoners of hierarchy. Leaders lay down a strategy, and everyone else is encouraged to acknowledge that it is perfectly formed.
political_campaigns  Conservative_Party  pundits  elections  Stephen_Harper  weaknesses  truth-telling  Canadian  delusions  self-delusions  Bruce_Anderson  Federal_Election_2015 
july 2015 by jerryking
Why a Presidential Campaign Is the Ultimate Start-Up - NYTimes.com
JUNE 4, 2015 | NYT | By NEIL IRWIN.

Campaigns and start-ups share common challenges as they ramp up operations. A campaign that wins its party’s nomination must expand exponentially as it moves from early primaries to a general election. What was once a small, tightknit group must suddenly add many more people, often those with more experience.

It is much like a start-up that goes from a dozen people in a garage to hundreds of staff members, many with deeper résumés than the original ragtag crew. Part of the job for those at the top is massaging egos and trying to keep everyone committed and enthusiastic even as that transition takes place....Some of the management questions are fundamental. Should power be concentrated at the top of an organization or distributed broadly? Should there be strict lines of authority in which everyone stays in his or her narrow lane, or a more open management structure where people cut across organizational barriers?... They stressed the importance of the leaders setting clear goals and giving subordinates leeway to reach them — combined with accountability should they fail....Both the Bush and Obama campaigns emphasized measuring success and failure quantitatively....One of the biggest tests of management is how it copes with a crisis.
political_campaigns  start_ups  Campaign_2008  Obama  metrics  truth-telling  measurements  crisis_management 
june 2015 by jerryking
The not-so-secret weapon to business success - The Globe and Mail
TONY GARERI
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 20 2015,
truth-telling  conversations  candour  stressful 
march 2015 by jerryking
Governments need to deliver big infrastructure projects honestly - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Mar. 09 2015

Why do big projects like these so often go over time and over budget? Ryerson University professor Murtaza Haider says that delays and overruns on megaprojects are common all over the world. Proponents of big projects consistently low-ball the cost for fear that the sticker shock might prevent them from ever getting built. “It is a very serious issue that goes to the heart of the credibility of all those who are building the infrastructure,” he says.

The hitches with the Spadina line are especially serious for a city such as Toronto that must spend billions to renew and build out its infrastructure. “If this is the norm, we have a problem,” says Prof. Haider.

Yes, we do. The dynamic at work here is universal and troubling. A government that announces a big, expensive project is loath to admit that things have gone wrong and that it is spending more public money than it said it would.

Instead, it grabs any opportunity to boast about how great the project is and how well it is going. Rather than being a monitor, it turns into a cheerleader.
Marcus_Gee  transit  infrastructure  cost_overruns  Toronto  truth-telling  honesty  megaprojects  normalization 
march 2015 by jerryking
Speaking Truth With Power - WSJ
By
John Fund
Updated Feb. 14, 2003

a growing number of black officials are breaking ranks by calling for a more honest approach to race relations. The latest is David Clarke, the elected sheriff of Milwaukee County, Wis., who accused other black elected officials of practicing a "cult of victimology" instead of making "real efforts to better the lives of black people." His critics claim that the 46-year-old Democrat is pandering to whites, but his message has struck a chord among voters of all races and could catapult him into higher office.
African-Americans  race_relations  truth-telling  police  victimhood  David_Clarke  speak_truth_to_power 
november 2014 by jerryking
Mister Right ·
APRIL 2011 | thewalrus.ca | bY MICHAEL POSNER

In recent years, the PMO has grown dramatically in size and power. The chief of staff functions like a consigliere: as well as calling signals for every offensive and defensive manoeuvre and controlling information flows, he’s the PM’s sounding board and last line of defence on every significant matter. “The important detail about Nigel,” says David Frum, “is that he’s ultra fair minded. His role isn’t to put his own thumb on the scale in terms of what gets presented to the prime minister. In other words, I don’t think you get these jobs unless you do have strong views, but you can’t succeed unless you’re able to put those views to one side. Nigel can and will.”
In the best of political circumstances, the chief of staff has the second-toughest job in Ottawa. University of Toronto political scientist Nelson Wiseman says it requires “a massive skill set. You’re overseeing 120-odd people, liaising with the Privy Council Office, dealing with the party caucus and the regional desks, coordinating four or five policy people and half a dozen speechwriters. Essentially, you’re the eyes, ears, and nose of the prime minister, and you have to be a very quick study.” Under Harper, an obsessive-compulsive micromanager who has brooked no serious opposition to his thinking (he’s been known to rehearse the remarks of his own ministers at cabinet meetings, in preparation for question period in the House of Commons), the job will likely be even tougher.
chief_of_staff  consigliere  fair_minded  information_flows  micromanagement  Nigel_Wright  Onex  PCO  PMO  Stephen_Harper  truth-telling 
july 2014 by jerryking
.@bradkeywell: You Want the Brutal Honesty of a Great Coach - The Accelerators - WSJ
June 19, 2013 | WSJ |

A great adviser listens, learns and reacts with blunt feedback to help entrepreneurs build the best playbook for winning in their industry.
honesty  truth-telling  coaching  boards_&_directors_&_governance  start_ups  feedback  entrepreneur  playbooks 
june 2013 by jerryking
Africa Needs Tough Love - WSJ.com
July 15, 2003 | WJS By GEORGE B.N. AYITTEY.

President Bush correctly recognized that what Africa needs is straight talk, tough love. Short of recolonization, there's only so much he can do to help unless Africa's leadership is willing to get serious about tackling its innumerable woes.
Africa  tough_love  foreign_aid  failed_states  Robert_Mugabe  truth-telling  Zimbabwe  capital_flight  sub-Saharan_Africa  leaders  leadership 
august 2012 by jerryking
Going Outside - WSJ.com
March 19, 2001 | WSJ | By CHRISTINA LE BEAU.
Going Outside
Advisory boards can provide straight talk, often at little cost
boards_&_directors_&_governance  truth-telling 
july 2012 by jerryking
An intellectual with the gloves off
24 May 2003 | The Globe and Mail pg. F.3| by John Allemang.

Tellingly, the former World Bank economist didn't just parade these hard facts as essential truths, but contrasted them with the soft-centred nostalgia felt by academics with a more sentimental education. "There's a tendency on the part of Western intellectuals to idealize rural life, and poor rural life, in developing countries."....His model of a university, which sounds a lot like a roundtable gathering at the White House, is of "a tough-minded place where there's a tough-minded clash of ideas, from which better ideas emerge." It's not an institution for the faint-hearted, and you can see that much of his impatience with the people and ideas he's confronted at Harvard have as much to do with a perceived lack of intellectual rigour as with their positioning on the spectrum of truth.
Larry_Summers  Harvard  intellectually_rigorous  deanships  Colleges_&_Universities  grade_inflation  growth  economic_development  truth-telling  tough-mindedness  developing_countries 
may 2012 by jerryking
Stephens: Who Will Tell the Truth About China? - WSJ.com
FEBRUARY 14, 2012

Who Will Tell the Truth About China?

By BRET STEPHENS
China  princelings  Xi_Jinping  truth-telling  propaganda 
february 2012 by jerryking
Bush, Iraq and Sister Souljah -
December 08, 2002 | NYT| By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.
Iraq  truth-telling  George_W._Bush 
january 2012 by jerryking
'Oops. I Told the Truth.'
October 17, 2004 | NYT | By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN.

The next U.S. president has three baby booms bearing down at us, and without a massive injection of truth-telling they could all explode on the next president's watch.
(1)American baby boom generation is now just two presidential terms away from claiming its Social Security and Medicare benefits.
(2) the young people in India, China and Eastern Europe, who in this increasingly flat world will be able to compete with your kids and mine more directly than ever for high-value-added jobs.
(3) the Arab world. The Arab region has had the highest rate of population growth in the world in the last half century. It has among the highest unemployment rates in the world today. And one-third of the Arab population is under the age of 15 and will soon be entering both a barren job market and its child-bearing years.
flat_world  Tom_Friedman  truth-telling  Bill_Cosby  Arab-Muslim_world  high-wage  baby_boomers  India  China  Eastern_Europe  young_people 
january 2012 by jerryking
Charlie Rose's Interview with Ray Dalio
October 20, 2011 | Charlie Rose Show | with Ray Dalio.

CHARLIE ROSE: And you always make a point that you know what you don`t know and that`s equally valuable.

RAY DALIO: More valuable. I want to say that -- so this is the whole philosophy. I -- I so, know that I can be wrong; and look, we all should recognize that we can be wrong. And if we recognize that we`re wrong and we worry about being wrong than what we should do is have a thoughtful dialogue....RAY DALIO: So the way I get to success. The way -- it`s not what I know. I`ve acquired some things that I know along the way and they`re helpful.

(CROSSTALK)

CHARLIE ROSE: It is -- it is -- it`s not what you know but it is --

(CROSSTALK)

RAY DALIO: It`s knowing what I don`t know or worrying that I won`t -- that I`ll be wrong that makes me find --

CHARLIE ROSE: Yes.

RAY DALIO: Well, I want people to criticize my point of view -- I want to hold down.

CHARLIE ROSE: Right.

RAY DALIO: Say I have a -- I think this but I may be wrong. And if you can attack what I`m saying -- in other words stress test what I`m saying -- I`ll learn....CHARLIE ROSE: And you have not been precise, and your assumptions are flawed.

RAY DALIO: Oh it`s so essential, right. There`s -- the -- the number one principle at our place is that if something doesn`t make sense to you, you have the right to explore it, to see if it makes sense.

I don`t want people around who do things that they don`t -- they don`t think makes sense because I`m going to have not-thinking people.

(CROSSTALK)

CHARLIE ROSE: Right.

RAY DALIO: So that they have not only the right, they have obligation. Don`t walk away thinking something`s wrong.

CHARLIE ROSE: Failure teaches you more than success?

RAY DALIO: Of course. One of my favorite books is "Einstein`s Mistakes."

CHARLIE ROSE: Right. And because it showed you that even Einstein, the most brilliant person of the century in common judgment made mistakes?

RAY DALIO: The great fallacy of all -- I think of all of mankind practically -- I mean that`s a big statement -- but the great fallacy is that people know more than what they do and there`s a discovery process and so when you look at -- that`s the process for learning.

The process for learning is to say "I don`t know." Like, I`m -- I`m totally comfortable being incompetent. If I -- if I -- I like being incompetent. I don`t mind being an incompetent. If I don`t -- how -- how much can you be competent about?

And so that whole notion of do you like learning? Do you like finding out what`s true and building on it without an ego? And that becomes the problem. How many statements do you listen to people that begin "I think this, I think that," where they should be asking "I wonder."
Ray_Dalio  interviews  truth-clarity  philanthropy  stress-tests  Charlie_Rose  truth-telling  Bridgewater  hedge_funds  deleveraging  organizational_culture  economics  unknowns  pretense_of_knowledge  Albert_Einstein  mistakes 
january 2012 by jerryking
Agenda 2002: Bite this, Canada
Dec 22, 2001| The Globe and Mail pg. A.23 | Edward Greenspon. .

Sept. 11 caused many Canadians to confront hard questions about what matters to them and about the kind of country they want Canada to be. The challenge of 2002, therefore, is to settle on those things that distinguish us -- the areas of sovereignty we truly want to protect and promote in differentiating ourselves in North America and the world.

By and large, these will not be economic, at least in the sense of the old instruments of nationalism. Canadians accept that economic integration provides a net benefit to them and would look askance at policies that impede the free flow of goods, services and people. As Mr. Chrétien put it this week: "You don't need to be anti-American to be pro-Canadian."

So where should we be looking for our national definition? What are the points of departure for a policy that is pro-Canadian without being anti-American?
truth-clarity  ProQuest  Edward_Greenspon  Canada  9/11  cohesiveness  national_identity  truth-telling  hard_questions  policymaking 
october 2011 by jerryking
Crovitz: Google Speaks Truth to Power - WSJ.com
OCTOBER 24, 2011

Google Speaks Truth to Power
About the growing regulatory state, even Google's Eric Schmidt—a big supporter of the Obama administration—now feels the need to tell it like it is.

By L. GORDON CROVITZ
Like this columnist
L._Gordon_Crovtiz  Google  Washington_D.C.  regulation  Eric_Schmidt  truth-telling  speak_truth_to_power 
october 2011 by jerryking
The Whole Truth and Nothing But - NYTimes.com
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
September 6, 2011

In America, says Kishore Mahbubani, dean of the Lee Kuan Yew School of
Public Policy at the National University of Singapore, “No U.S. leaders
dare to tell the truth to the people. All their pronouncements rest on a
mythical assumption that ‘recovery’ is around the corner. Implicitly,
they say this is a normal recession. But this is no normal recession.
There will be no painless solution. ‘Sacrifice’ will be needed, and the
American people know this. But no American politician dares utter the
word ‘sacrifice.’ Painful truths cannot be told.”
truth-telling  Kishore_Mahbubani  Singapore  Tom_Friedman  sacrifice 
september 2011 by jerryking
Zadie Smith's rules for writers | Books | guardian.co.uk
22 Feb. 2010 / guardian.co.uk/ Here are Zadie Smith's golden
rules for writing:
1 As a child, make sure you read a lot of books. Spend more time doing
this than anything else.
2 As an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it,
better still, as an enemy would.
3 Don't romanticise your "vocation". You can either write good sentences
or you can't. What matters is what is left on the pg.
4 Avoid your weaknesses. But do this without dismissing the things you
don't excel at.
5 Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.
6 Avoid cliques, gangs, groups. Crowds won't make your writing any
better than it is.
7 Work disconnected from the ­Web.
8 Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away
from it, even the people who are most important to you.
9 Don't confuse honours with achievement.
10 Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand – but tell it.
Accept the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.
writing  advice  writers  tips  reading  books  quotes  rules_of_the_game  affirmations  weaknesses  truth-telling  restlessness  dissatisfaction  golden_rules 
may 2011 by jerryking

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