recentpopularlog in

jerryking : utoronto   73

Keeping the Mink Mile hot in a cooling retail era - The Globe and Mail
WALLACE IMMEN
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 19, 2019

* HIGH-END RETAIL EXPERIENCE IS PUSHING ITS BOUNDARIES
The affluence of this retail location influences nearby streets, spilling north to the area’s namesake Yorkville Avenue.
Turns out this northern stretch of Yorkville Avenue between the Hazelton Hotel at 118 Yorkville Ave. and Bellair Street has seen rents nearly double over the course of three years, currently averaging between $250 and $275 a square foot, JLL found. By comparison, leases on Toronto’s Queen Street West average $100 a square foot, Robson Street in Vancouver $225 and Saint-Catherine Street in Montreal $210, JLL reports. Of course, those numbers pale in comparison to New York’s upper Fifth Avenue, where rents can reach US$2,720, the Beverly Hills triangle in Los Angeles that can command US$1,100 and Oxford Street in London where prime rents are the equivalent of US$775.

* GROWTH IN UPSCALE SHOPPING AREA ISN’T AN ACCIDENT
Yorkville’s launch into the upper echelons didn’t happen by accident, though. Even a few years ago, there was speculation that with shifts in retailing toward more online shopping and a retrenchment of brands that the zone north of the Mink Mile would fall into decline.

Yorkville was getting decidedly shop worn by 2011, when First Capital Properties, a subsidiary of First Capital Realty Inc., acquired Hazelton Lanes, a 1970s shopping mall at the corner of Avenue Road and Yorkville Avenue.

To pump life into the area, First Capital developed a long-term vision for Yorkville that started with a total renovation of the old mall – to give it more street presence. The redevelopment also allowed for a rebranding and the mall became known as Yorkville Village.....There are about 11,000 condominium units in the immediate area and that’s destined to double in the next two years based on what is planned for the area and what is currently under construction.

Add to this the tourism and the business community along Bloor Street and the University of Toronto, and the area is rich in potential customers,

* TREND IN HIGH-END RETAILING REQUIRES ONGOING COMMUNITY SUPPORT
In the past, many brands shifted their flagship stores into enclosed malls, but there’s now a shift back to brands – particularly the higher-end and exclusive name brands – having their main flagship stores at street level in Yorkville.......While the trend in high-end retailing is as much a developer’s vision as it is a retailer’s desire, a lot of the growth in this luxury retail space can be attributed to continual community-building efforts.

“We work in collaboration with other landlords and retailers and galleries in the area to create a sense of neighbourhood,” says Melissa Campisi, First Capital’s director of strategic partnerships and event management.....Events and attractions throughout the year are key to building a retail experience.... In a space that was formerly an Anthoropolgie store, First Capital arranged fashion talks and charity events........

* THE FUTURE OF THE HIGH-END RETAIL EXPERIENCE AT YORKVILLE
The Yorkville area is destined to become even more of a world-class retail destination as the area transforms with an unprecedented amount of construction and new leasing activity......The trends are in favour of growth for luxury retail, concludes the 2019 Canadian Luxury Apparel Market report by retail marketing research firm Trendex North America...... the Canadian luxury apparel market will increase by 5.8 per cent in 2019 and by 18 per cent from 2019 to 2023, to reach $3.2-billion in sales within the next five years.....More importantly,...the luxury sector growth rate will be nearly twice that of the overall clothing retail sector.
affluence  brands  densification  high-end  luxury  Mink_Mile  neighbourhoods  property_development  real_estate  rebranding  retailers  Toronto  upscale  urban_intensification  uToronto  Wallace_Immen  Yorkville 
november 2019 by jerryking
University of Toronto announces largest donation in school’s history for construction of new centre, institute
MARCH 25, 2019 | The Globe and Mail | by JOE FRIESEN.
Billionaire investor Gerald Schwartz and Indigo chief executive Heather Reisman announced Monday that they will donate $100-million to the University of Toronto for the construction of a new centre for innovation and entrepreneurship as well as an institute that will study the impact of emerging technologies on society......We read an article together about this bold ambition the university had to create a new complex that would be devoted to the whole subject of technology and innovation,” Ms. Reisman said. “The things that they talked about housing there were things we were interested in – the Vector Institute [for Artificial Intelligence], the Creative Destruction Lab, the entrepreneurs. We looked at each other and said ‘We’d like to support that.’"

Mr. Gertler said the gift is affirmation of the role the university plays in innovation in fields such as machine learning, gene editing and regenerative medicine.

“There are very few gifts across the country that have been this big,” Mr. Gertler said. “It draws on U of T’s world class strength, both in machine learning and the ethics and philosophy of technological change and its impact on society.”
CDL  Colleges_&_Universities  entrepreneurship  Gerald_Schwartz  Heather_Reisman  innovation  Joe_Friesen  Meric_Gertler  moguls  philanthropy  uToronto  Vector_Institute 
march 2019 by jerryking
Former finance minister, ambassador and businessman Michael Wilson dies at 81 - The Globe and Mail
TIM KILADZE AND ERIC ANDREW-GEE
PUBLISHED FEBRUARY 10, 2019

Michael Wilson, a former federal finance minister and stalwart of Canadian business who overcame personal tragedy in later life to become an advocate for mental-health support, has died at 81.

Under prime minister Brian Mulroney, Mr. Wilson helped negotiate the North American free-trade agreement and brought in the federal goods and services tax, initiatives that were controversial at the time, but have survived to become pillars of federal policy......Mr. Wilson went on to have a laurelled career after politics as Canadian ambassador to the United States in the late 2000s and then chancellor of the University of Toronto from 2012 until 2018....He was also a veteran investment banker with a career in finance that spanned more than half a century and included senior roles at UBS Canada, Royal Bank of Canada and, most recently, Barclays Capital Canada.

But, of late, he was perhaps best known for his dedication to raising awareness of mental-health issues after his son Cameron died by suicide in 1995, at the age of 29​. That work included serving as chair of the Mental Health Commission of Canada for the past four years......Anthony Fell was Mr. Wilson’s boss as CEO of RBC Dominion Securities when Mr. Wilson was a partner in the investment bank, before entering federal politics. The two stayed close friends.

“It’s been said that one of the best thing you can leave behind is a sterling reputation for integrity and for making a positive difference in peoples’ lives, and this Michael Wilson has done throughout his life, in very full measure,” Mr. Fell said on Sunday.
Canada  Canadian  crossborder  Bay_Street  FTA  GST  investment_banking  leaders  mental_health  Michael_Wilson  NAFTA  obituaries  politicians  Progressive_Conservatives  RBC  UBS  UCC  uToronto  public_service  Tim_Kiladze 
february 2019 by jerryking
Canada 200: How to build a business superpower by 2067
Ottawa's upcoming IP strategy should include training for academics, entrepreneurs and administrators about the strategic importance of patents. But those same players must also collectively push to create global standards for technologies developed here. Other countries, including China and the United States, effectively ensure new global standards incorporate their homegrown technology, locking in value for their emerging champions. Canada, by comparison, is a "boy scout," says Michel Girard, vice-president of the Standards Council of Canada.
Artic  biotech  Canada  cannabis  cleantech  Colleges_&_Universities  digital_economy  elitism  gender_gap  infrastructure  intellectual_property  life_sciences  patents  ports  technical_standards  universal_basic_income  uToronto  Vancouver  women 
july 2017 by jerryking
Former TDSB director guilty of plagiarizing his PhD, panel says - The Globe and Mail
CAROLINE ALPHONSO - EDUCATION REPORTER
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jun. 20, 2017

An independent disciplinary tribunal at the University of Toronto found that Chris Spence, the former director of the Toronto District School Board, knowingly lifted and dropped paragraphs and sentences into his 1996 thesis.

The panel on Tuesday recommended that his PhD be “cancelled and recalled.” It also recommended that the university expel Dr. Spence and a permanent notification be placed on his academic transcript.......In December, a discipline committee of the Ontario College of Teachers found him guilty of professional misconduct and his teaching certificate was revoked. This was the first time the college revoked a teaching certificate because of plagiarism.....
TDSB  plagiarism  Chris_Spence  uToronto  PhDs 
june 2017 by jerryking
Acclaimed Canadian historian, author Michael Bliss dies at 76 - The Globe and Mail
TORONTO — The Canadian Press
Published Thursday, May 18, 2017

Bliss authored 14 books on business, politics, and medicine, was an Officer of the Order of Canada, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and a member of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

When Bliss was inducted into the Medical Hall of Fame in 2016, Canadian Museum of History president Mark O’Neill called him “one of Canada’s leading intellectuals and historians.”

“Michael Bliss brings a wealth of knowledge to Canada and the world,” O’Neill said.
Canadian  historians  authors  writers  obituaries  uToronto  Michael_Bliss 
may 2017 by jerryking
Southern Ontario should be an innovation cluster, not a farm team - The Globe and Mail
PATRICK DEANE, MERIC GERTLER AND FERIDUN HAMDULLAHPUR
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Monday, Dec. 28, 2015
industrial_policies  uToronto  uWaterloo  innovation  Ontario  clusters  Kitchener-Waterloo 
december 2015 by jerryking
Canada a new technology hotbed? If so, we need to commit to it - The Globe and Mail
KHANJAN DESAI
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Aug. 14, 2015

the end goal should be about making Canada the centre of gravity for another ecosystem.

In the words of Wayne Gretzky, we need to skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been.

The hardware opportunity has already become mainstream, and other ecosystems have already pounced on it, but Canada isn’t far behind. We are creating companies to solve complex problems in the health-medical and wearable-technology spaces, and applying complex nanotechnologies to revolutionize conventional markets.

Nanotechnology engineering graduates from the University of Waterloo are now starting companies at the same pace as any other program at the university, and a venture fund for innovations exclusively in the quantum domain was just created in Waterloo. Wearable-technology and machine-learning startups are booming, with the University of Toronto alumni leading the charge, and we’re just getting started. The Creative Destruction Lab is launching a separate stream to support machine-learning startups and Velocity recently launched the Velocity Foundry program to house startups that build physical products.

If Canada is going to become the hotbed for wearable technology or create a Quantum Valley in the Waterloo region, we need to commit to it. It’s much better to be extremely good at one thing than be mediocre at many things.
Neverfrost  start_ups  uWaterloo  uToronto  Silicon_Valley  CDL  Canada  Y_Combinator  ecosystems  wearables  nanotechnology  machine_learning  Velocity  Pablo_Picasso  widgets  Kitchener-Waterloo  quantum_computing  complex_problems 
august 2015 by jerryking
How Ubernomics can transform Canada’s legal diseconomy - The Globe and Mail
MICHAEL MOTALA
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jul. 10, 2015

Technologists from other industries hope Ubernomics is a generalizable business model. This month, the MaRS Discovery District launched LegalX, an industry cluster aimed at promoting local entrepreneurship, driving industry efficiency and pioneering new business models. One of its first startups is a service called LawScout. Like Uber, it offers a simple digital platform aimed at connecting small businesses with local lawyers on a fixed-rate basis. Beagle, another product launched at the event, performs rapid contract analysis using a sophisticated algorithm, while providing a platform for social media-inspired collaboration among decision-making teams....Ubernomics is not a panacea for the legal sector. Rather than disrupt it, it will transform. Big firms are here to stay if they embrace innovation. Digital technologies promise more efficient work flows and higher productivity. The shortcomings of the consensus-driven decision-making structure, exemplified by the fall of Heenan Blaikie, suggests more strategic thinking, stronger leadership and a heavier investment in R&D is needed to make legal work more efficient and cost effective......We live in an absurd legal diseconomy. There is an ever-widening gap between supply and unmet demand. Following the Ontario government's tuition deregulation in 1998, University of Toronto law led the charge, raising tuition by 320 per cent under dean Ron Daniels. Other law schools followed suit and continue to do so. This year, U of T law is unashamed to charge incoming students more than $30,000 a year. Not to be left out, the Law Society of Upper Canada recently doubled its licensing fees. The legal academy is aggravating the access to justice crisis by imposing ever-higher rents on the most vulnerable entrants to the profession. A false and parasitic empiricism has evidently burrowed itself in the minds of our country's greatest legal thinkers.

Ubernomics is not a panacea for the legal sector. Rather than disrupt it, it will transform. Big firms are here to stay if they embrace innovation. Digital technologies promise more efficient work flows and higher productivity. The shortcomings of the consensus-driven decision-making structure, exemplified by the fall of Heenan Blaikie, suggests more strategic thinking, stronger leadership and a heavier investment in R&D is needed to make legal work more efficient and cost effective.........
Businesses like fixed-cost projections. The billable-hour model introduces a lot of uncertainty into the equation. Software such as LawScout is unlikely to undermine the legal industry’s biggest players, but it signals that an economic culture shift lies ahead.
arbitrage  billing  contracts  digital_disruption  disruption  fees_&_commissions  invoicing  law  law_firms  law_schools  lawtech  legal  sharing_economy  start_ups  Uber  unmet_demand  uToronto 
july 2015 by jerryking
Rotman students receive crash course in the Brandes way - The Globe and Mail
LUKE KAWA
The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Mar. 15 2015

The last book his father gave him before his death, Alan said, was Benjamin Graham’s The Intelligent Investor, which Charles Brandes calls the greatest investing book of all time.
uToronto  Rotman  crossborder  books  San_Diego  value_investing/investors  Benjamin_Graham  fundamental_analysis 
march 2015 by jerryking
The promise and peril of digital diplomacy - The Globe and Mail
TAYLOR OWEN
Contributed to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Jan. 09 2015

the same governments that are seeking to enable free speech in countries like Iran are at the same time rapidly expanding the surveillance state. Thanks to the revelations of Edward Snowden we now know how the state has chosen to respond to this new space of digital empowerment. Like a traditional battlefield, they are seeking to control it. To, as they themselves claim, “know it all.”

And herein lies the central tension in the digital diplomacy initiative. By seeking to control, monitor and undermine the actions of perceived negative actors, the state risks breaking the very system that positively empowers so many. And this will ultimately harm those living under autocratic and democratic regimes alike.

The answer, unfortunately, is not as simple as many critics of digital diplomacy assert. Simply returning to traditional in-person diplomacy ignores the global shift to decentralized digital power. Digital diplomacy is a well-intentioned attempt to participate in this new space. However, it is one that is both ill-suited to the capabilities of the state, and is negated by other digital foreign policy programs.

We are at the start of a reconfiguration of power. Navigating this terrain is one of the principal foreign policy challenges of the 21st century.
diplomacy  risks  Communicating_&_Connecting  social_media  foreign_policy  uToronto  public_diplomacy  Outsourcing  Edward_Snowden  challenges  21st._century  rogue_actors  digital_diplomacy  surveillance_state 
february 2015 by jerryking
Want to kickstart the Canadian economy? Try "indovation", says U of T prof | U of T News
January 26, 2015 | U of T News | Terry Lavender.

Professor Dilip Soman heads up U of T's India Innovation Institute. He explains how necessity can be the mother of innovation. Indovation is a portmanteau of the words “Indian” and “innovation” and it means taking existing constraints – such as a shortage of funds or raw materials – into account when developing a response to actual problems.... “Frugality is at the essence of it,” Soman says. “In India, unless you can drive down costs, your idea is a non-starter.

“For example, mobile banking. That’s a classic ‘indovation’. It came about as a response to a particular problem, and it was developed in India and adopted in the west,” says Soman.

we’re working on developing a dataset on reverse innovation; the idea that innovations that have developed in the global south can be scaled back to the western world,” Soman says. “We have white papers on several topics: crowd-funding, agriculture, and retail and investment opportunities. The goal is to build up a database of information that both researchers as well as practitioners can use.”
constraints  innovation  India  Rotman  uToronto  trickle-up  frugality  necessity  reverse_innovation  jugaad  Bottom_of_the_Pyramid  datasets  Indians 
february 2015 by jerryking
Renaissance man Joseph Rotman was a patron of education - The Globe and Mail
JANET MCFARLAND
The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jan. 27 2015

He and his wife, the former Sandra Frieberg, whom he married in 1959 and with whom he had two children, have long been known for their support for Canadian culture and arts.
Rotman  obituaries  UWO  philanthropy  institution-building  moguls  tributes  benefactors  uToronto  culture  cultural_institutions  patronage  education  Colleges_&_Universities  renaissance  Renaissance_man 
january 2015 by jerryking
Mayor Ford’s dubious budget claims don’t stand up - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Aug. 14 2014

A summary of the report from the University of Toronto’s Institute on Municipal Finance and Governance says flatly that “Toronto does not have a ‘spending problem’ – with expenditures roughly the same as they were a decade ago, when inflation and population growth are taken into account.”....To put it another way, the authors believe that the city has a revenue problem, not a spending problem. The mayor did not mention that “interesting point” when he used the report to tout his record.
Marcus_Gee  Rob_Ford  Toronto  cost-cutting  uToronto  expenditures  budgets 
august 2014 by jerryking
Strategic intelligence /
Strategic intelligence /
author
edited by Loch K. Johnson.
books  security_&_intelligence  uToronto  libraries 
november 2013 by jerryking
At Your Service
Autumn 2013 | University of Toronto Magazine| By Janet Rowe.

Personal librarians help first-year students understand U of T’s libraries....For students who haven’t been assigned a personal librarian, Vine offers an insider secret. “One of my favourite ‘hidden’ resources is a set of bibliographies on many subjects,” she says. “Prepared by experts, each item has an abstract that can help you figure out if the article is suitable for your assignment – a big time-saver for busy students. The trick is to look under ‘Oxford Bibliographies Online’ in the library catalogue.” Bonus: many paywall-protected articles are free when accessed through the library website.
personal_libraries  libraries  uToronto  curation  Colleges_&_Universities  research  paywalls  hidden  personalization  outreach  expertise 
november 2013 by jerryking
An "A" for Teamwork
Autumn 2013 | University of Toronto Magazine | By Patchen Barss

You’ve heard of crowdfunding. With crowdmarking, a U of T prof hopes to change how students are evaluated
Colleges_&_Universities  students  uToronto  crowdsourcing  assessments_&_evaluations 
november 2013 by jerryking
Eyes Everywhere
Autumn 2013 | University of Toronto Magazine |By Scott Anderson
NSA  security_&_intelligence  uToronto  CSE  surveillance  sigint 
november 2013 by jerryking
U of T Launches School of Public Health
Summer 2008 | University of Toronto Magazine | By Christa Poole.
$20-million gift from Paul Dalla Lana creates new medical hub
uToronto  entrepreneur  real_estate  endowments  angels  moguls  public_health  philanthropy 
march 2013 by jerryking
The Technopreneurs
Winter 2013 | University of Toronto Magazine | By Alison Motluk
The Technopreneurs

Science students get a month-long crash course in turning an idea into a viable business at U of T’s “Techno” program.
By Alison Motluk
uToronto  alumni  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  incubators 
january 2013 by jerryking
uToronto_data feeds
July 6, 2004

My initial questions are: what sort of data-generating events would be of most interest to U of T's varied stakeholders? As an example. what if U of T was to track in real time the volume of activity at the check out counter at Roberts Library, or the utilization of its parking lots, or the utilization of student computing facilities, or the onlihe registration into specific courses. or the arrival of grant monies? Could the capture, storage and analysis of this information allow individual stakeholders to save time or to make better decisions? Could broadcasting this information improve the perception of the University's commitment to customer service? Would some stakeholders be willing to pay for this information? If so. how much? What about tragic events e.g. alerting stakeholders to a localized disaster’? Can one really charge for that service or is that more of a public good like a free 911 call?
jck  Paul_Kedrosky  Andy_Kessler  hacks  data  uToronto  syndications  real-time  public_goods 
june 2012 by jerryking
Meeting Global Challenges | U of T Cross Disciplinary Innovation | By David Naylor | University of Toronto Magazine
Summer 2011 | |By David Naylor.

U of T is teaching future leaders to think creatively across disciplines
Canada must have universities that can do two related things: conduct the advanced research that will help surmount the grand challenges that humanity now faces, and offer the best and brightest students an education that will help them build a more successful nation and a better world. No university in Canada is better positioned to meet those objectives.
uToronto  Colleges_&_Universities  interdisciplinary  cross-cultural  David_Naylor  students  the_best_and_brightest 
november 2011 by jerryking
Lord of the Loaves | Steve Gibson, Fred's Bread, Toronto Bakery | By Susan Pedwell | University of Toronto Magazine
Summer 2011
Lord of the Loaves

Steve Gibson’s final MBA project has left him rolling in dough
By Susan Pedwell
baked_goods  MBAs  Rotman  alumni  uToronto  bread 
november 2011 by jerryking
U of T contributes to New York's push for academic excellence
john lorinc
From Friday's Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011

The University of Toronto has joined a team of international schools to make a bid to build a $450-million urban sciences campus in Brooklyn, N.Y.

The deal includes a promise of city-owned land and $100-million in seed capital. It is part of an ambitious plan by New York’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg to develop a world-class engineering and research commercialization facility. ...Mr. Bloomberg, with his trademark alacrity, wants shovels in the ground by 2013, when he leaves office. “The sense of urgency comes directly form the mayor,” said Seth Pinsky, president of New York’s economic development agency. “We have a limited window of opportunity.”

The radical economic development scheme, considered by many to be the mayor’s legacy project, is expected to generate $6-billion in spin-off investment and create 30,000 creative-class jobs in coming decades.

Mr. Pinsky describes the strategy as “an Erie Canal moment,” a reference to a controversial 1820s decision by a state governor to build an upstate shipping channel. The investment that drove vast wealth into the port of New York....“It may be the single most transformative investment of the Bloomberg administration,” said Richard Florida, director of the Martin Prosperity Initiative at the University of Toronto. “I only wish more cities would think that way.”

With large Canadian universities stuffed to capacity and some provinces considering new campuses, New York’s experiment is a game-changing wealth-generating strategy and ups the ante for big cities like Toronto and Vancouver, said Dr. Florida. “If you see a place like New York moving in this direction, you’ve just seen your biggest competitor take a big step ahead.”
uToronto  Colleges_&_Universities  New_York_City  Michael_Bloomberg  John_Lorinc  urgency  transformational  Erie_Canal  windows_of_opportunity  Richard_Florida  upstate  game_changers  economic_development  wealth_creation  cities  creative_class  the_single_most_important  Martin_Prosperity_Institute 
october 2011 by jerryking
Precious Cargo
October 6, 2011 | Report on Small Business | Siri Agrell
With high-definition TVs revealing the tiniest flaws in an actor's makeup, celebrities have retaliated by putting their faith in Cargo president Hana Zalzal's cosmetic solutions. And they're not the only ones snapping up the company's products.

Cargo Cosmetics, a multimillion-dollar international makeup brand headquartered in a modest building on an unassuming strip of Toronto's Don Mills Road, and guided by president Hana Zalzal, a 47-year-old entrepreneur who knows her physics, having earned a civil engineering degree at the University of Toronto followed by an MBA. She then worked for two years designing cable systems for Bell Canada before founding Cargo in 1995 with the idea of modernizing makeup.

The company has since become a global brand and a favourite of celebs and regular chicks alike, due in large part to the way she has applied her engineer's eye to the design and packaging of cosmetic staples.
Siri_Agrell  cosmetics  celebrities  makeup  women  entrepreneur  uToronto  engineering  Rotman 
october 2011 by jerryking
McGill ranks No. 17 among world’s top universities - The Globe and Mail
RHÉAL SÉGUIN
QUEBEC CITY— From Monday's Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Sep. 04, 2011
Colleges_&_Universities  ranked_list  McGill  rankings  uToronto  UWO 
september 2011 by jerryking
Felix Chee: Building an economic bridge to China - The Globe and Mail
JACQUIE McNISH
TORONTO— From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Mar. 25, 2011.

Felix Chee nudged China’s sovereign wealth fund to its most successful
direct investment ever, when he convinced China Investment Corp. to bet
$1.5-billion (U.S.) in 2009 on embattled Teck Resources Ltd. TCK.B-T
That investment is now worth $5.4-billion. In January 2011 came “the
highlight” of Mr. Chee’s career, when CIC opened a Toronto office with
him at the helm as its chief representative. The world’s fifth-largest
sovereign wealth fund, with $332-billion of assets, snubbed larger
capital markets by opening its first non-Asian office here, putting Mr.
Chee in a unique position to help build the fragile economic bridge that
links Canada’s resource riches with the world’s fastest-growing major
economy.
China  Canada  FDI  Manulife  uToronto  profile  sovereign_wealth_funds  Felix_Chee  CIC  capital_markets 
march 2011 by jerryking
The financing gender gap - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 04, 2011|Globe and Mail | Special to MARJO JOHNE
An October 2010 report by the SME Financing Data Initiative – a joint
project by Industry Canada, Statistics Canada and Finance Canada to
gather information on financing for small and medium-sized enterprises –
found that, in 2007, 85 % of female-owned small businesses that applied
for a loan were approved. By comparison, the approval rate for
male-owned small businesses was 96 %. Female-owned businesses also got
less money, receiving an average amount of $118,000, compared with
$284,000 for the companies owned by men. At the same time, female
entrepreneurs had to provide lenders with more documentation – such as
personal financial statements, appraisals of assets and cash flow
projections – than male entrepreneurs, the report found.
gender_gap  entrepreneurship  women  uToronto  glass_ceilings  funding  financial_statements  SMEs  venture_capital 
march 2011 by jerryking
A Global Affair | Launch of Munk School of Global Affairs, Janice Stein International Relations
Autumn 2010 | | University of Toronto Magazine | | By
Cynthia Macdonald. Armed with $80 million in new funding, the Munk
School aims to become one of the top international relations programs in
the world.
uToronto  globalization  international_relations 
november 2010 by jerryking
Start-Up U | U of T Culture of Innovation, Commercialization of Research in Toronto
Autumn 2010 | University of Toronto Magazine | By David Naylor. U of T is helping to create a culture of innovation
By David Naylor
start_ups  uToronto  MaRS  commercialization  innovation  entrepreneurship  interdisciplinary  incubators  David_Naylor 
november 2010 by jerryking
It’s innovation that matters
June 11, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | by Roger Martin, Dean -
Rotman, U of T, Chair - Institute for Competitiveness &Prosperity.
Our public policies designed to increase innovation aren’t working –
and this is because we confuse “innovation” with “invention.” The terms
are actually very different. Invention can be defined as “creation or
discovery of something new to the world,” often producer-driven,
following an inventor’s curiosity or expertise. While new, inventions
may not have any real use. Innovation is customer-driven, providing a
new product or process that adds value to somebody’s life. Innovations
improve economic or social well-being. Innovations are often built from
inventions....Innovation creates value in several ways, such as enabling
consumers to do something that had been impossible or difficult, or at a
lower cost, either by delivering the same benefits as existing
offerings, but at a lower price, or by maintaining the price but
reducing the overall costs of use.
innovation  innovation_policies  Roger_Martin  Rotman  uToronto  Four_Seasons  Harlequin  Manulife  public_policy  inventions  customer-driven  demand-driven 
june 2010 by jerryking
Harness the power of design thinking
May. 06, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Rasha Mourtada. design
thinking actually imagines what people might want and concretizes it.”
“Before someone created a loft space, everyone wanted eight-foot
ceilings. But when this other option was introduced, people gravitated
to it. The power of design thinking is introducing these new paradigms.”
Instead of approaching the design of a product – or a customer-service
experience, or a workflow or any other aspect of business – with the
idea of improving something that already exists, put the original idea
aside for a moment and start with a clean slate.

Imagining the possibilities is one thing. But how does that translate
into doing?
Rasha_Mourtada  design  Rotman  uToronto  Umbra  Loblaws  Four_Seasons  Indigo 
may 2010 by jerryking
A 'rare moment of recognition' for a pioneer of social history - The Globe and Mail
Mar. 17, 2010 | Globe & Mail | by SIRI AGRELL. Toronto
historian Natalie Zemon Davis was named yesterday as the recipient of
the Holberg International Memorial Prize - awarded by the Norwegian
parliament and worth about $785,000.

U of T president David Naylor said the international recognition is a
"fantastic boost" to the school's arts, social science and humanities
faculties, and validates a continued focus on areas of studies that have
suffered a decline in public funding and support.
uToronto  historians  history  humanities  David_Naylor  public_funding 
march 2010 by jerryking
U of T to curtail aggressive investing - The Globe and Mail
ELIZABETH CHURCH

From Monday's Globe and Mail Published on Monday, Feb. 22, 2010
uToronto  endowments  finance 
february 2010 by jerryking
By Grand Design | John Daniels Real Estate Developer, U of T Faculty of Architecture
Summer 2008 | University of Toronto Magazine | By Scott
Anderson. A $14-million gift from John and Myrna Daniels will
transform the Faculty of Architecture
philanthropy  real_estate  uToronto  alumni  JCK  prospects  property_development 
february 2010 by jerryking
Multicultural Critical Theory. At Business School? - NYTimes.com
January 9, 2010 | New York Times | By LANE WALLACE. "
students needed to learn how to think critically and creatively every
bit as much as they needed to learn finance or accounting. More
specifically, they needed to learn how to approach problems from many
perspectives and to combine various approaches to find innovative
solutions" . "...design thinking is, it’s focused on taking that
understanding you have about the world and using that as a set of
insights from which to be creative"....”...Yale has also added a
“problem framing” course that tries to have students think more broadly,
question assumptions, view problems through multiple lenses and learn
from history.
“There’s a great deal to learn from Bismarck, Kissinger, F.D.R. and
J.F.K. about problem framing".
Roger_Martin  Rotman  uToronto  design  ideo  critical_thinking  problem_framing  Tim_Brown  Yale  history  business_schools  FDR  JFK  Henry_Kissinger  von_Bismarck 
january 2010 by jerryking
Fields Institute - Overview
The Fields Institute is a center for mathematical research
activity - a place where mathematicians from Canada and abroad, from
business, industry and financial institutions, can come together to
carry out research and formulate problems of mutual interest. Our
mission is to provide a supportive and stimulating environment for
mathematics innovation and education. The Fields Institute promotes
mathematical activity in Canada and helps to expand the application of
mathematics in modern society.
uToronto  mathematics  finance 
november 2009 by jerryking
uToronto starts collecting library fee from other schools
October 16, 2009| globecampus.ca | Joey Coleman. The
University of Toronto announced in September that all non-uToronto users
of their library collections must pay an annual fee of $200.
Colleges_&_Universities  libraries  fees_&_commissions  uToronto 
october 2009 by jerryking
40 ideas we need now -- Unlearning the tyranny of facts
Nov. 2006 | This Magazine | DAVID NAYLOR. Engage in critical
thinking. Pinpoint flaws in logic, dissect rhetorical flourishes away
from the core of an argument, examine issues from different perspectives
and differentiate science from pseudo-science...We are still very
focused on facts—arrayed in patterns, conveyed passively, or uncovered
more or less predictably through cookbook experimentation and
unchallenging exploration. That emphasis seems incongruous. With
computers able to store and search vast amounts of information, facts
are cheap [JCK:the Web is really a source of "external knowledge"]...What might the next generation of learners do instead of
memorizing facts, you ask? Among other things, they could read and play
music. Play more sports. Write prose and poetry. Acquire a skeptic’s
toolkit of sound reasoning skills. Debate highly-charged issues and
learn the lost art of rational and respectful discourse. Study
inspirational biographies, not to memorize facts, but to promote
understanding of how one might lead a more meaningful life.

[From my own note: the presence of facts does not mean that the truth is present. The "truth" is a more complicated thing than mere facts alone]
agreeably_disagree  argumentation  biographies  commoditization_of_information  critical_thinking  David_Naylor  disagreements  external_knowledge  facts  ideas  infoliteracy  inspiration  logic_&_reasoning  poetry  public_discourse  rhetoric  skepticism  sports  uToronto 
may 2009 by jerryking
globeandmail.com - Economic vision for Ontario: foster ideas over industry
February 4, 2009| G& M |by KAREN HOWLETT on a report,
commissioned by Premier Dalton McGuinty and written by urban thinker
Richard Florida and Roger Martin, the dean of the University of
Toronto's Rotman School of Management. "Ontario's future depends on
nurturing creativity and intelligence rather than protecting the past by
bailing out struggling manufacturers,"
economic_development  Toronto  creativity  innovation  Dalton_McGuinty  Richard_Florida  Roger_Martin  Rotman  uToronto  Ontario  future 
february 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read