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jerryking : urban_planning   25

Why Robert Moses Keeps Rising From an Unquiet Grave - The New York Times
By DAVID W. DUNLAPMARCH 21, 2017
Robert Moses.

Builder of infrastructure. Ravager of neighborhoods. Maker of omelets. Breaker of eggs. Never mind civics texts. “The Power Broker,” Robert A. Caro’s biography of Mr. Moses, is the book that still must be read — 43 years after it was published — to understand how New York really works.

The reputation of Mr. Moses, good and bad, has outlived those of every governor and mayor he nominally served, with the possible exceptions of Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia, who had the sense to get an airport named after him, and Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, whose name speaks for itself.....“Before him, there was no Triborough Bridge, Jones Beach State Park, Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, West Side Highway or Long Island parkway system or Niagara and St. Lawrence power projects. He built all of these and more.”

“Before Mr. Moses, New York State had a modest amount of parkland; when he left his position as chief of the state park system, the state had 2,567,256 acres. He built 658 playgrounds in New York City, 416 miles of parkways and 13 bridges.”

“But he was more than just a builder. Although he disdained theories, he was a major theoretical influence on the shape of the American city, because the works he created in New York proved a model for the nation at large. His vision of a city of highways and towers — which in his later years came to be discredited by younger planners — influenced the planning of cities around the nation.”

“His guiding hand made New York, known as a city of mass transit, also the nation’s first city for the automobile age.”
Robert_Moses  New_York_City  urban  urban_planning  cities  political_biographies  power_brokers  city_builders 
march 2017 by jerryking
Uber Extends an Olive Branch to Local Governments: Its Data
JAN. 8, 2017 | - The New York Times | By MIKE ISAAC.

unveiled Movement, a stand-alone website it hopes will persuade city planners to consider Uber as part of urban development and transit systems in the future.

The site, which Uber will invite planning agencies and researchers to visit in the coming weeks, will allow outsiders to study traffic patterns and speeds across cities using data collected by tens of thousands of Uber vehicles. Users can use Movement to compare average trip times across certain points in cities and see what effect something like a baseball game might have on traffic patterns. Eventually, the company plans to make Movement available to the general public.
municipalities  urban  urban_planning  cities  Boston  partnerships  Uber  Movement  data  data_driven  traffic_analysis 
january 2017 by jerryking
Toronto announces plans for new downtown park above active railway - The Globe and Mail
MAHNOOR YAWAR
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Aug. 03, 2016

Toronto plans to build a large-scale downtown park above the railway corridor between Bathurst Street and the Rogers Centre. The Rail Deck Park, spanning 21 acres (8.5 hectares), would harness the open space above the active railway in a bid to connect downtown with the waterfront and counter high-rise development in the densely populated area. ...The proposed park will be modelled after the likes of Chicago’s Millennium Park or the under-construction Hudson Yards in Manhattan, both of which “decked” over active rail corridors.
Toronto  parks  CN  waterfronts  intensification  Rail_Deck_Park  South_Core  railways  urban_intensification  urban_planning 
august 2016 by jerryking
Toronto’s Yonge Street evolving from sleazy ‘strip’ into a global landmark - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015

Yonge is about to go through big changes, becoming not just a renowned national street but a world street, with a level of density and activity that will make it feel more like Tokyo or Shanghai than the jumbled, still shabby downtown stretch that visitors see today.

More than 30 building projects, many of them soaring towers, are in the works. At one intersection alone, Yonge and Gerrard, six towers are coming, and that is on top of the immense glass skyscraper that already stands on the northwest corner.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  landmarks  public_spaces  Yonge_Street  revitalization  property_development  urban_planning  quality_of_life 
november 2015 by jerryking
Toronto has finally found the confidence to act like a big city - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 18 2015

Toronto has finally found the confidence to act like a big city.

Back in the 1970s, Toronto was so fearful about density and development that city hall slapped a temporary 45-foot (13.7-metre) height restriction on new construction in the downtown core. Over time, planners have come to understand that if the region is going to absorb hundreds of thousands of newcomers without succumbing to endless urban sprawl, it will have to grow up rather than out. Now the boom in condo construction and the vogue for downtown living has made it possible to build a denser, livelier urban core. If central Toronto is starting to feel even a bit like Manhattan, it can only be a good thing.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  densification  downtown_core  urban  urbanization  urban_intensification  urban_planning  skyscrapers  building_codes 
march 2015 by jerryking
How the big-data revolution can help design ideal cities - The Globe and Mail
DAVE MCGINN
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Sep. 24 2014

The big-data revolution faces two key challenges, both concerning the collection of information.

First, as is always the case when it comes to monitoring individuals and collecting details about their lives, is privacy. Second, there is the issue of using that data responsibly....Once municipalities have that consent, there is then the issue of harmonizing data sets in order to gain a fuller picture of issues. For instance, if a municipality wants to understand water-consumption levels, it helps to know how they track weather patterns.

Many cities are still struggling to understand how to use big data, but it promises to be a hugely important urban-planning tool.
algorithms  IBM  real-time  urban  sensors  municipalities  massive_data_sets  cities  data  decision_making  privacy  urban_planning  open_data 
september 2014 by jerryking
Livable, booming core stirs envy, but raises infrastructure worries - The Globe and Mail
MARCUS GEE
The Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, May. 14 2014

Young people are flocking to inhabit the lively, walkable neighbourhoods springing up downtown. In some, such as King-Spadina and Waterfront West, seven out of 10 residents are ‘echo boomers,’ 20 to 39 years old.

The number of people working downtown has been soaring, too. Downtown gained more than 43,000 office jobs in the five years to 2011. A host of big companies, from Google to Telus to Coca-Cola, have moved into new downtown offices. Although downtown contains just 3 per cent of the city’s land area, it accounts for half of its GDP, a third of its jobs and a quarter of its tax base. More than a quarter of a million people commute into downtown each morning by public transit.
Marcus_Gee  Toronto  urban  urbanization  urban_intensification  urban_planning  downtown_core  Big_Tech  millennials  neighbourhoods  King-Spadina  Port_Lands  livability  walkability 
june 2014 by jerryking
What Tech Hasn’t Learned From Urban Planning - NYTimes.com
By ALLISON ARIEFF
Published: December 13, 2013

“Community space” implies something that is open to, well, the community. Subverting of naming conventions to suggest public access and transparency, while providing neither, is troubling and increasingly pervasive. But this turning inward, despite the incessant drumbeat of “community,” is quickly becoming the rule rather than the exception.... In “The Death and Life of Great American Cities,” Jane Jacobs wrote, “Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.” We’re losing that here. The further the tech sector gets from the reality of the problems it’s engaging with, the smaller piece of the problem they’ll end up actually fixing.

The tech sector’s embrace of urbanist lingua franca and its enthusiasm to engage with urban problems is awesome, and much welcomed. But these folks need to become better urbanists.
design  urban_planning  San_Francisco  technology  community  Jane_Jacobs 
december 2013 by jerryking
Why we’re better off living in hyperdense cities built around mass transit
Oct. 11 2013 | G&M | ALEX BOZIKOVIC.

Vishaan Chakrabarti is getting into a cab. This is a bit surprising because the architect and academic is a constant transit rider, like most of his neighbours in Manhattan.

“I’m a guy who’s usually in the subway, unless I have a few calls to make,” he admits good-naturedly as a fire truck screams past him. He thinks we should ride the subway, too – his new book, A Country of Cities, argues that “hyperdense” cities built around mass transit, make us more prosperous and happier, too.
cities  design  densification  transit  books  urban_intensification  urban_planning 
october 2013 by jerryking
TTC to probe conversion of two GO train tracks - The Globe and Mail
KALEIGH ROGERS

The Globe and Mail

Published
Wednesday, Jul. 24 2013

The feasibility study will look at the impacts of including more vehicles on the busy lines, but TTC CEO Andy Byford said its worth considering as the corridors are not at capacity yet.

“It does seem to me there is some spare capacity. At the end of the day, we should be looking to sweat the assets and maximize use of all rail corridors in this city,” Mr. Byford said, adding a more substantial relief line to the east end would still be needed.

“That takes time to construct, and it’s $8-billion that we don’t currently have. Certainly as a stop gap, I think we should be talking to GO to say, ‘Is there anything that we can do in a much shorter time frame?’”
transit  TTC  DRL  Toronto  urban_intensification  urban_planning  sweating_the_assets 
august 2013 by jerryking
Robert Moses, Pedal Pusher? | By Thomas J. Campanella - WSJ.com
June 25, 2012 | WSJ | by THOMAS J. CAMPANELLA.

The rollout this summer of New York's first bicycle-share program will be the most visible achievement yet of the city's capable commissioner of transportation, Janette Sadik-Khan. Funded by Citigroup and Mastercard, the Citi Bike System will make available 10,000 bicycles for rent and return at any of 600 stations throughout Manhattan and Brooklyn. With Citi Bike, Ms. Sadik-Khan has spun a gossamer new transportation web across much of the city, a healthful and sustainable alternative to getting around by car.
New_York_City  urban  urban_planning  bicycles  rentals  Citigroup  Mastercard  Robert_Moses  transportation  rollouts  sharing_economy  bike_sharing 
august 2012 by jerryking
Meet the man who shaped 20th-century Toronto - The Globe and Mail
JOHN LORINC
From Saturday's Globe and Mail
Published Friday, May. 18, 2012

Rowland Caldwell Harris – who began a 33-year term as works commissioner a century ago this week – left his civic fingerprints all over Toronto, building hundreds of kilometres of sidewalks, sewers, paved roads, streetcar tracks, public baths and washrooms, landmark bridges and even the precursor plans to the GO commuter rail network.

“The significance of Harris a hundred years later is that we’re still living fundamentally in the city he imagined,” observes Dalhousie architecture professor Steven Mannell, who studies his career and has advised city officials on an extensive rehabilitation of the R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant, due to be finished next year.

Mr. Harris famously added a second deck to the Prince Edward Viaduct in anticipation of a subway line that wasn’t built for decades. What’s less well known is that Mr. Harris was a photo buff who, in 1930, presided over the city’s first planning exercise – a process that led to construction of congestion-easing arterials such as Dundas Street East and the parkway extension of Mount Pleasant through Rosedale and up towards St. Clair.
John_Lorinc  Toronto  trailblazers  R.C._Harris  architecture  wastewater-treatment  infrastructure  municipalities  urban  urban_planning  landmarks  bridges  foresight  imagination  TTC  '30s  city_builders 
may 2012 by jerryking
New urban design plays a heady game of risk
Mar 12, 2005 | The Globe and Mail pg. F.3|
Doug Saunders.

The slogan of the new movement that is overtaking Europe's cities: "To make it safe, you need to make it dangerous." Iain Borden, director of the Bartlett School of Architecture in London and a leader of this new movement. Its members recently published an intriguing report titled "What Are We Scared of: The Value of Risk in Designing Public Space."

In recent months, a school of architects and urban planners has picked up disparate cues from the urban experiments taking place in northern Europe and given them a name -- risk. Our cities, they believe, are now designed predominantly to minimize risk, and this has made them dull, homogeneous, repetitious and, paradoxically, often quite dangerous.

(Risk is more than an intellectual puzzle — it invokes a profoundly physical experience. A small amount of danger surrounding the use of public spaces might act much like a vaccine immunizing the population against complacency).
Doug_Saunders  urban  design  risks  safety  public_spaces  counterintuitive  urban_planning  uncertainty  complacency  biology  psychology  dangers  life_skills  coming-of-age  risk-assessment  high-risk  low-risk  soul-enriching  physical_experiences 
october 2011 by jerryking
Don't Try This at Home
SEPT. / OCT. 2010 | Foreign Policy | BY MARGARET O'MARA. I've
met with officials from Bangalore, Barcelona, Chennai, Dublin, Fukuoka,
Helsinki, Shenzhen, Stockholm, and many American cities as well. They
all want to know the same thing: How did the Valley do it? And how can
we duplicate its success? Unfortunately, there are a lot of wrong ways
to go about building the next Silicon Valley...Yet I still have a hard
time convincing the never-ending delegations of urban planners of the
importance of the other, broader things government can do, like
liberalizing immigration rules and creating an environment full of
educational opportunities and start-up capital for untested young
entrepreneurs. This simply doesn't resonate for many of the would-be
silicon cities being constructed by the Russias and Chinas of the world;
with their long histories of centralized control, they are still
convinced they can order up success.
cities  public_policy  location  innovation  top-down  centralized_control  Russia  China  urban_planning  Silicon_Valley 
september 2010 by jerryking

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