recentpopularlog in

jerryking : ux   33

Want to transform your industry? Be ready to embrace resistance - The Globe and Mail
BRETT BELCHETZ
SPECIAL TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL

important lessons that we learned along the way:

TAKE WHAT’S USEFUL, LEAVE WHAT’S NOT
Comments and criticisms can be invaluable for young companies – but you need to become a master at differentiating between feedback that matters and feedback that doesn’t. ...... it’s critical to pay attention to actual customers, zeroing in on their feedback (both good and bad) and continuously improving our offering. It’s important not to dilute the quality of the user experience in an effort to jump over hurdles raised by non-customers.

FOCUS ON THE “PERSUADABLES”
It’s essential that your company identify those who are persuadable from those who are not... Pick targets carefully and convert them strategically......Circle back to the “unpersuadables” at a later point.

VIEW CHALLENGES AS COMPLIMENTS
.....If your vision didn’t have a chance of succeeding or wasn’t ambitious enough, nobody important would care enough to challenge you. The reality is that many industries are in need of evolution, and those pushing for change are rarely celebrated or welcomed by their peers. To succeed as a leader with a transformative vision, it’s necessary to celebrate resistance.

NEVER FORGET YOUR MISSION
Focus on your original mission – the problem you set out to solve in the first place. That’s your North Star. And surround yourself with people who believe in it too. Everything you do from day one onward has to tie back to your mission in a clear and compelling way. Resistance is inevitable, but it can never – not even for a second – throw you off course. The leaders and companies that succeed are the ones who remain dead focused on their reason for existing. It’s much easier to deal with resistance when you know, without a doubt, the value you will bring by overcoming it.
challenges  compliment  feedback  industry  mission-driven  North_Star  persuasion  resistance  transformational  UX 
november 2019 by jerryking
When manipulation is the digital business model
May 1, 2019 | Financial Times | MADHUMITA MURGIA.
dark_side  UX 
may 2019 by jerryking
The Design Revolution in Consumer Tech - WSJ
By Steve Vassallo
Aug. 6, 2017

Walt Mossberg...began his first column for the Journal, in 1991, with the now-famous line, “Personal computers are just too hard to use, and it isn’t your fault.” In his final column, Mr. Mossberg bookends the quarter-century of products, personalities and progress he’s chronicled with this assessment of where we are now: “Personal technology is usually pretty easy to use, and, if it’s not, it’s not your fault.” In a generation, consumer tech went from unreliable and confusing to so intuitive that children are creating immersive three-dimensional worlds on devices with barely any instruction. Mr. Mossberg doesn’t put a name to this remarkable shift, but as someone who witnessed it firsthand, I will: design. By design, I don’t mean a spiffy logo or a pretty website. Design now also refers to a methodology and a mind-set that place the experience of the end user above all. This form of design isn’t concerned chiefly with how good something looks, but, rather, how well it works for ordinary consumers. In the [early] ’90s....“engineers weren’t designing products for normal people.” ......Engineers tend to focus on sheer technical limits: what can be done. But designers are preoccupied with what should be done. In other words, whether they’re building things that solve actual problems or fulfill real wants....Over the past two decades, advances in computing power have met typical users’ speed and reliability needs, and the means to launch products have grown better and more affordable. As a result, design is now the differentiator—and the driving force behind billion-dollar companies....Apple's products (e.g. iPod, iPhone), weren’t technical breakthroughs.....They were design breakthroughs—instances of creative need-finding and human-attuned problem solving. And they raised consumer expectations for technology, ushering in a new era of innovation....Google has invested heavily to reinvent itself as a design-centric business. Incumbents like Samsung , General Electric and IBM have spent hundreds of millions to build in-house design studios with thousands of designers. ...Slack and Airbnb—like Pinterest, Instagram and Kickstarter—are recent successes founded by designers, people who are devoted to the practice of building impeccably considerate technology. Design is the key to building the next great wave of companies. To compete seriously on design, startups must make it central to their strategy from the beginning......we’re entering the age of “ambient computing,” when personal technology will become invisible and omnipresent. Augmented reality, artificial intelligence, robotics, drones, the Internet of Things, and other nascent tech will fade into the background of our lives. Technology will no longer come in the form of gadgets. Instead, as Mr. Mossberg predicts, “it’ll be about actual experiences, with much less emphasis on the way those experiences get made.”....The 21st century will be the century of the designer founder, when core value for businesses is created by entrepreneurs who have a deeper, more intuitive sense for the human condition.
Walter_Mossberg  retirement  design  design_thinking  technology  IDEO  '90s  UX  Apple  ambient_computing  customer_expectations  uncharted_problems  pervasive_computing  the_human_condition  augmented_reality  core_values  unarticulated_desires  farewells 
august 2017 by jerryking
The Amazon-Walmart Showdown That Explains the Modern Economy - The New York Times
Neil Irwin @Neil_Irwin JUNE 16, 2017

The decision by Amazon and Walmart to compete for my grocery business — as well as for space in my closet — is a tiny battle in a war to dominate a changing global economy.

And for companies that can’t compete on price and technology, it could cost them the shirt off their backs.....[Amazon's purchase of high-end grocery chain Whole Foods places it] on a collision course with Walmart to try to be the predominant seller of pretty much everything you buy.

Each one is trying to become more like the other — Walmart by investing heavily in its technology, Amazon by opening physical bookstores and now buying physical supermarkets. But this is more than a battle between two business titans. Their rivalry sheds light on the shifting economics of nearly every major industry, replete with winner-take-all effects and huge advantages that accrue to the biggest and best-run organizations, to the detriment of upstarts and second-fiddle players.....in turn...this has more worrying implications for jobs, wages and inequality.

Amazon vs. Walmart

Both want to sell everything!!!!

Walmart is buying Bonobos, an omnichannel innovator. Its website and online customer service are excellent, and it operates stores in major cities where you can try on garments and order items to be shipped directly. Because all the actual inventory is centralized, the stores themselves can occupy minimal square footage. The acquisition helps Walmart build expertise in the very areas where it is trying to gain on Amazon.

Walmart and Amazon have had their sights on each other for years, each aiming to be the dominant seller of goods via omnichannel.

Amazon's purchase of Whole Foods helps it to understand the grocery business which has a whole different set of challenges from the types of goods that Amazon has specialized in heretofore.

A Positive Returns-to-Scale World
The apparel business has long been a highly competitive industry in which countless players could find a niche.....any shirt-maker that tried to get too big rapidly faced diminishing returns.It would have to pay more and more to lease the real estate for far-flung stores, and would have to outbid competitors to hire all the experienced shirt-makers. The expansion wouldn’t offer any meaningful cost savings and would entail a lot more headaches trying to manage it all....in the digital economy, rather than reflecting those diminishing returns to scale, show positive returns to scale: The biggest companies have a huge advantage over smaller players. That tends to tilt markets toward a handful of players or even a monopoly....The apparel industry...is moving in the direction of being like the software business (high fixed costs, zero variable costs, enormous returns to scale)..... the reason why Walmart and Amazon are so eager get into the shirt business is because retailers know that they need to figure out how to manage sophisticated supply chains connecting Southeast Asia with stores in big American cities so that they rarely run out of product. They need mobile apps and websites that offer a seamless user experience so that nothing stands between a would-be purchaser and an order....Larger companies that are good at supply chain management and technology can spread those more-or-less fixed costs around more total sales, enabling them to keep prices lower than a niche player and entrench their advantage....large companies will invest in automation/robotics...the future of clothing/apparel might be a handful of companies with the very expensive shirt-making robots---and everyone else shut out in the cold.

What It Means for the Economy

A relative few winners are taking a disproportionate share of business in a wide range of industries....in turn may help explain why the income gap has widened in recent years. How much on income inequality is driven by shifting technology — as opposed to changing corporate behavior, or loose antitrust policy — is an open debate.
increasing_returns_to_scale  winner-take-all  fixed_costs  variable_costs  Amazon  Wal-Mart  Whole_Foods  retailers  economics  Bonobos  shirts  mens'_clothing  omnichannel  apparel  digital_economy  automation  robotics  competitive_landscape  market_concentration  barbell_effect  income_inequality  antitrust  market_power  corporate_concentration  grocery  fresh_produce  supermarkets  large_companies  UX  inventory-free  global_economy 
june 2017 by jerryking
Fareed Zakaria: ‘We are meant to be engaged with the big questions’ - The Globe and Mail
RUDYARD GRIFFITHS
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Apr. 17 2015

Q: How is your defence of a liberal-arts education more than nostalgia for a bygone era of higher learning, now out of sync with today’s hyper-competitive, skills-based economies?

...what’s happening in advanced manufacturing. In almost every industry, basic production is getting commoditized. It’s becoming routine and simple, and most everything we consume, to put it bluntly, can be made by a machine or a factory worker. You can manufacture a $30 sneaker anywhere in the world but, to sell it for $300, there has to be a story around it, there has to be beautiful design, there has to be interesting marketing; you have to understand social media....because product[s]stand out only if you understand how human beings use technology....Mark Zuckerberg says that Facebook is more about psychology and sociology, two liberal arts, than technology...a liberal education provides you with a rounded education in every sense of the word. It teaches you how to write, which I think is the most important aspect, because you learn how to think. It teaches you how to learn. These are soft skills but they’re not lesser skills.
liberal_arts  humanities  Fareed_Zakaria  Rudyard_Griffiths  social_media  Mark_Zuckerberg  education  civics  psychology  sociology  soft_skills  thinking  design  product_design  Daniel_Pink  UX 
april 2015 by jerryking
The Evolving Automotive Ecosystem - The CIO Report - WSJ
April 6, 2015| WSJ | By IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER.

An issue in many other industries. Will the legacy industry leaders be able to embrace the new digital technologies, processes and culture, or will they inevitably fall behind their faster moving, more culturally adept digital-native competitors? [the great game]

(1) Find new partners and dance: “The structure of the automotive industry will likely change rapidly. Designing and producing new vehicles have become far too complex and expensive for any likely one company to manage all on its own.
(2) Become data masters: “Know your customers better than they know themselves. Use that data to curate every aspect of the customer experience from when they first learn about the car to the dealership experience and throughout the customer life cycle. Having data scientists on staff will likely be the rule, not the exception.
(3) Update your economic models: “Predicting demand was hard enough in the old days, when you did a major new product launch approximately every five years. Now, with the intensity of competition, the rapid cadence of new launches, and the mashup of consumer and automotive technology, you may need new economic models for predicting demand, capital expenditures, and vehicle profitability.
(4)Tame complexity: “It’s all about the center stack, the seamless connectivity with nomadic devices, the elegance of the Human Machine Interface.
(5) Create adaptable organizations: “It will take a combination of new hard and soft skills to build the cars and the companies of the future. For many older, established companies, that means culture change, bringing in new talent, and rethinking every aspect of process and people management.
Apple  automotive_industry  autonomous_vehicles  ecosystems  Google  know_your_customer  adaptability  CIOs  layer_mastery  competitive_landscape  competitive_strategy  connected_devices  telematics  data  data_driven  data_scientists  customer_experience  curation  structural_change  accelerated_lifecycles  UX  complexity  legacy_players  business_development  modelling  Irving_Wladawsky-Berger  SMAC_stack  cultural_change  digitalization  connected_cars  the_great_game 
april 2015 by jerryking
Powerful Thoughts From Paul Graham — Ross Hudgens
21. Empathy is probably the single most important difference between a good hacker and a great one. Some hackers are quite smart, but practically solipsists when it comes to empathy. It’s hard for such people to design great software, because they can’t see things from the user’s point of view.

25. In a field like physics, if we disagree with past generations it’s because we’re right and they’re wrong. But this becomes rapidly less true as you move away from the certainty of the hard sciences. By the time you get to social questions, many changes are just fashion.

34. Whatever the reason, there seems a clear correlation between intelligence and willingness to consider shocking ideas. This isn’t just because smart people actively work to find holes in conventional thinking. Conventions also have less hold over them to start with. You can see that in the way they dress.

43. E.B. White was amused to learn from a farmer friend that many electrified fences don’t have any current running through them. The cows apparently learn to stay away from them, and after that you don’t need the current. | If you’re a hacker who has thought of one day starting a startup, there are probably two things keeping you from doing it. One is that you don’t know anything about business. The other is that you’re afraid of competition. Neither of these fences have any current in them.

50. But since for most of the world’s history the main route to wealth was to steal it, we tend to be suspicious of rich people.

59. “A lot of the (people applying to be graduate students at MIT) seem smart,” he said. “What I can’t tell is whether they have any kind of taste.” Taste. You don’t hear that word much now. And yet we still need the underlying concept, whatever we call it. What my friend meant was that he wanted students who were not just good technicians, but who could use their technical knowledge to design beautiful things.

64. Good design resembles nature. It’s not so much that resembling nature is intrinsically good as that nature has had a long time to work on the problem. So it’s a good sign when your answer resembles nature’s.

70. You’re most likely to get good design if the intended users include the designer himself. When you design something for a group that doesn’t include you, it tends to be for people you consider less sophisticated than you, not more sophisticated. And looking down on the user, however benevolently, always seems to corrupt the designer. [Good design therefore requires personal risk? having skin in the game?]

76. “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive.” – C.S. Lewis
biomimicry  business  inspiration  productivity  quotes  start_ups  Paul_Graham  Y_Combinator  via:hotchkiss  empathy  design  UX  hackers  personal_risk  PhDs  aesthetics  dangerous_ideas  smart_people  the_single_most_important 
november 2014 by jerryking
Small Data: Why Tinder-like apps are the way of the future — Medium
+++++++++++++++++++++++
The card-based UI updates the classic way in which we’ve always interacted with physical cards. When you think about it, cards are nothing more than bite-size presentations of concrete information. They’re the natural evolution of the newsfeed, which is useful for reading stories but not for making decisions.
++++++++++++++++++++++++
Cards are kind of natural choice for mobile screens because of their size and shape. But lay your cards on the table or put them on a board and they will also help you in revealing connections, understanding the topic and making decisions.
++++++++++++++++++++++++

every single interaction with card-swiping apps can affect the outcome.

We can call it small data. Imagine if every time you made a yes or no decision on Tinder, the app learned what kind of profiles you tended to like, and it showed you profiles based on this information in the future.

“With swipes on Tinder, the act of navigating through content is merged with inputting an action on that content,” says Rad. That means that every time a user browses profiles, it generates personal behavioral data.
bite-sized  Tinder  small_data  ux  design  decision_making  information_overload  behavioural_data  metadata  gestures  Snapchat  personal_data 
march 2014 by jerryking
Intel’s Sharp-Eyed Social Scientist
FEB. 15, 2014 | NYT |By NATASHA SINGER.

Dr. Bell’s title at Intel, the world’s largest producer of semiconductors, is director of user experience research at Intel Labs, the company’s research arm. She runs a skunk works of some 100 social scientists and designers who travel the globe, observing how people use technology in their homes and in public. The team’s findings help inform the company’s product development process, and are also often shared with the laptop makers, automakers and other companies that embed Intel processors in their goods.
Intel  UX  anthropologists  semiconductors  observations  product_development  ethnography  consumer_research  anthropology  automotive_industry  laptops  social_science 
february 2014 by jerryking
Why empathy is an economic necessity - The Globe and Mail
TODD HIRSCH

Special to The Globe and Mail

Published Wednesday, Aug. 14 2013

The world is full of wonderfully engineered, but poorly designed products – with no eye for how the average person might use it. This highlights a certain quality that isn’t taught in business schools but can make a huge difference for companies developing new products: empathy.

Empathy is the ability to see the world through someone else’s eyes. It’s far more than just being a nice person. If properly developed, empathy can give you and your company a distinct competitive edge. Negotiating a contract, dealing with workplace conflicts, coming up with a marketing campaign, or dreaming up the next must-have consumer gadget all require the ability to see the world through eyes that aren’t your own.

Sadly, managers and human resource departments too often neglect the interpersonal skills that are so essential to achieving results. Along with other aptitudes such as story-telling and creativity, empathy is underappreciated by many in the corporate board room. The fact that we even call them “soft” skills implies that they’re less important....The ability to see the world through the eyes of others is an economic imperative. If empathy were given the attention it deserves, companies would find new ways to please their customers. Innovators would dream up systems that save time and money. Conflicts would be resolved more easily. And maybe – just maybe – engineers would design products that are simple to use.
empathy  product_development  design  skills  storytelling  Todd_Hirsch  UX  usability  competitive_advantage  under_appreciated  people_skills  new_products  interpersonal_interactions  soft_skills  delighting_customers  product_design  economic_imperatives  must-have_experience 
august 2013 by jerryking
Car Companies Tap Data Trove - WSJ.com
March 7, 2013 | WSJ| By IAN SHERR And MIKE RAMSEY.
Drive Into the Future
Your car knows a lot about you. And it's talking....Automakers are exploring ways to use information form cars on the road to improve the driving experience, car design, fuel efficiency and financing, among other things...Improving safety, however, isn't the only way car companies can use that data. Mr. Koslowski estimates that by 2016, up to a third of all interactions between car companies and their customers will happen in the vehicle. Car companies, for example, could collect and analyze data about how customers use leased vehicles, and based on that information suggest other cars a driver might like around the time his or her lease is expiring, he says.

"They can notice all the vehicle seat belts are occupied and they can say, hey, maybe you want a family vehicle," Mr. Koslowski says....In the coming years, auto makers like Ford, Audi AG NSU.XE +0.34% and others see even more potential in big data. They envision taking information from customers' typical driving patterns, schedules and movements on the road to recommend routes the drivers might feel more comfortable with, either because they prefer city streets to freeways or don't respond well to bumper-to-bumper traffic.
massive_data_sets  automotive_industry  data  pattern_recognition  traffic_congestion  data_driven  product_recalls  social_media  telematics  customer_experience  UX 
march 2013 by jerryking
Seth's Blog: States rights
posted by Seth Godin on November 02, 2007

Don't treat everyone the same. First time visitors want something different than repeaters. Loyal customers want to see something different from the masses.

Get your IT person to show you how to divide the world into states. Then start from scratch and make a different experience for everyone.
websites  market_segmentation  Seth_Godin  customer_loyalty  tips  customer_experience  IT  UX  first_time_visitors  repeat_visitors 
september 2012 by jerryking
Design Sets Tone at Square, a Mobile Payments Start-Up - NYTimes.com
By NICK BILTON
| January 15, 2012,

“We believe strongly that the company is going to be reflected in the product and vice-versa,” Mr. Dorsey said. “The internal matches the external and the external matches the internal, and if we can’t provide a clean, simple, well-designed experience in here, it’s not going to be reflected in our identity. It’s in our DNA.” (Mr. Dorsey also is the chairman and co-founder of Twitter, where his obsession with openness is not as extreme.)

Square also borrows metaphors from traditional institutions, including the old United States Mint building, which sits across the street from the company’s office. “It looks like something that is built to last; it looks like it will stay up forever,” he said. “So how do you build that into pixels instead of stone?”

For centuries banks were built with thick stone walls, marble slab floors and heavy metal doors, all of which gave customers the feeling that bankers were dependable and trustworthy.

Square transactions primarily occur on a small plastic plug, inserted into a smartphone’s headphone jack, through which people swipe credit cards.

A hefty chunk of marble it is not. Square’s front door to customers is a smartphone application. Square has to provide the simplest experience possible, Mr. Dorsey believes, because, along with good design, it will evoke trust and confidence in a new financial institution that lives in a smartphone.
Square  Jack_Dorsey  start_ups  mobile_payments  metaphors  design  smartphones  mobile_applications  UX  customer_experience  trustworthiness  confidence 
january 2012 by jerryking
Interview: The cellphone anthropologist
11 June 2008 | New Scientist | by Jason Palmer.

How do phones fit in?
The common denominator between cultures, regardless of age, gender or context is: keys, money and,
if you own one, a mobile phone. Why those three objects? Without wanting to sound hyperbolic,
essentially it boils down to survival. Keys provide access to warmth and shelter, money is a very
versatile tool that can buy food, transport and so on. A mobile phone, people soon realise, is a great
tool for recovering from emergency situations, especially if the first two fail.

What uses surprised you?
In a country like Uganda, most mobile phones are prepay. What we saw was that people are using their
phones as a kind of money transfer system. They would buy prepaid credit in the city, ring up a phone
kiosk operator in a village, read out the number associated with that credit so that the kiosk operator
could top up their own phone, then ask that the credit be passed on to someone in the village - say,
their sister - in cash....

With this level of informal innovation going on, can you bring anything extra to the table?
I'm not going to give you the bland corporate answer - "we do this research and then six months later a
product drops off the factory line that perfectly reflects our vision" - because the world is much messier
and more interesting than that. But, for instance, we did a study on phone sharing in Uganda and
Indonesia, and within a year - which is really quick when you're talking about hardware changes - we
had two products out which support multiple address books,
Nokia  interviews  anthropology  mobile_phones  UX  prepaid  emerging_markets  Uganda  credit  Jan_Chipcase  ethnography  Indonesia  anthropologists  insights  new_products 
october 2011 by jerryking
Technology Devices Either Sell Big or Die Fast - NYTimes.com
August 23, 2011 | NYT | By JENNA WORTHAM & VERNE G.
KOPYTOFF. In recent years, technology companies have been cutting their
losses with increasing speed...These days, big technology companies —
particularly those in the hypercompetitive smartphone and tablet
industries — are starting to resemble Hollywood film studios. Every
release needs to be a blockbuster, and the only measure of success is
the opening-weekend gross. There is little to no room for the sleeper
indie hit that builds good word of mouth to become a solid performer
over time. ...this accelerated lifecycle of high-end hardware is being
described as “Darwinian.” ...Companies kill new products more quickly
now because of the higher cost of staying competitive, ..The crush of
tech bloggers and Twitter-using early adopters .. raises the stakes
around how well new products perform in the marketplace...One needs
everything in place: the content, the applications and the
experience--to have a reasonable chance at success. [JCK: "everything in place" = ecosystems]
accelerated_lifecycles  attrition_rates  blockbusters  content  culling  Darwinian  ecosystems  hits  Jenna_Wortham  kill_rates  mobile_applications  new_products  product_development  product_launches  social_media  smartphones  speed  tablets  UX  winner-take-all 
august 2011 by jerryking
Jenkins, Jr.: How Apple Foot-Dragged to Victory - WSJ.com
* JANUARY 26, 2011

How Apple Foot-Dragged to Victory
Steve Jobs's formula for success: Don't Rush.
Holman_Jenkins  Apple  Steve_Jobs  ux 
january 2011 by jerryking
Cognition: The blog of web design & development firm Happy Cog
Thank you for considering Happy Cog for your project.
Happy Cog projects start at $100,000 USD.
Kindly complete this Project Planner so we can determine if the unique
aspects of your project align with our capabilities and availability. We
realize it’s quite a bit to ask of you up front, but those that go on
to become Happy Cog clients often tell us it’s a worthwhile exercise.
blog  webdesign  inspiration  design  ux  web  blogs  JCK 
november 2010 by jerryking
Wanted: a new approach to inventiveness
Jul 27, 2010 | FT | Ranjay Gulati.

The economic crisis has forced many companies to rethink their innovation strategy. On the one hand, they have maturing products that can only be enhanced incrementally. At the same time, their customers have both more information on which to base buying decisions and less money to spend. ......the marketplace is tough, with some companies facing plummeting returns on their research and development spending.

There is, apparently, a dilemma: squeeze the R&D budget or bet the company’s future on finding the next market-disrupting “big” product.

Both approaches are wrong.

Redefining innovation
entails breaking out of engineer-led obsessions with the technical
product details and thinking closely about the customer experience: not
just how well the product functions but also ancillary enhancements that
improve that experience, including packaging, delivery, post-sale
service or mktg. Examples: (1) Packaging vegetables in a single bag
requires limited technical innovation but solves an everyday problem for
busy people who want their families to eat healthy food. Bagged salads
have become a $ billion industry. (2) Similarly, Target, the retailer,
broke no new high-tech ground when it offered its own-brand crisps in
resealable bags - the idea is decades-old but Target successfully
addressed a nagging problem (keeping crisps fresh). Redefining
innovation requires involving more voices in the innovation process,
including fns. such as customer svce., mktg. and sales, that may have
played a limited role in the past.
customer_experience  economic_downturn  HBR  innovation  inventiveness  marketing  problem_solving  sales  Target  UX  vegetables 
september 2010 by jerryking
Shoot The Focus Group
NOVEMBER 14, 2005 | Business Week | by David Kiley
consumer_research  customer_experience  ux  focus_groups 
may 2010 by jerryking
Basics of Conducting Focus Groups
January 11, 2006 | by Carter McNamara, MBA, PhD, Authenticity Consulting, LLC.
consumer_research  ux  howto  customer_experience  focus_groups 
may 2010 by jerryking
Another View: Peering Clearly at the Future - DealBook Blog - NYTimes.com
April 20, 2010 | New York Times | by Mike Kwatinetz and
Cameron Lester of Azure Capital Partners who explain how they examine
the the market dynamics of successful start-ups. "Here are our five
principles:

1. Lower component costs and improvements in component technology
enable new platforms to emerge.

2. New platforms breed new application winners.

3. Creating a new ecosystem creates substantial competitive
advantage.

4. Economics always matter, such as a cost advantage for the
start-up or strong return on investment for customers.

5. A leap in user experience can drive substantial adoption.
competitive_advantage  cost_advantages  customer_adoption  customer_experience  ecosystems  forecasting  investment_thesis  investors  platforms  ROI  rules_of_the_game  start_ups  step_change  UX  venture_capital 
april 2010 by jerryking
jared spool on user research methods
July 15, 2005 | Adaptive path | by Peter Merholz
research  testing  usability  ux  methods 
january 2010 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read