recentpopularlog in

jerryking : vacations   7

Always seek out novelty — even at home
April 26, 2019 | Financial Times | by Tim Harford.
* A Mathematical Theory of Communication by Claude Shannon (1948)
* The search for new experiences should not just be for our holidays.
* Japan: 10 days in a far-off land produces a richer treasury of detailed memories than 10 weeks back home. But why?
* Actively searching for new experiences --whether on holiday abroad or within your daily routine at home!!
* Novelty isn't just about mental stimulation. It also exposes you to opportunity.....Variation also reshapes the mental categorisation of experiences, so that freshness can be found within routine activities.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
While on an adventurous holiday, many people experience that strange sense of time having slowed down in the most pleasurable way, and of conversations that begin, “Was it really only yesterday that we . . . ?”

Ten days in a far-off land produces a richer treasury of detailed memories than 10 weeks back home. But what is behind this phenomenon?

Claude Shannon,in 1948, published one of his two profound contributions, A Mathematical Theory of Communication.....a message can be compressed to the extent that it is predictable. ....(e.g. Ritualised conversations (“How are you?” “Very well, thank you. How are you?”) can be heavily compressed.....A movie can be compressed because, between cuts, each frame tends to resemble the previous one....Although the parallel is not exact, much the same thing seems to be going on with our memories of life. The brain is not a video recorder; we recall the gist. Sometimes the gist is very brief. If I get up in the morning at the usual time, eat my customary breakfast and catch my usual train to the office, why should my brain trouble itself to remember this day two weeks after the fact? The diffs are barely worth bothering with. In contrast, fresh experiences defy compression: the diffs are too big........Brian Christian, author of The Most Human Human, a book about conversations between humans and computers, speculates that if we’re seeking advice we should ask the person of whose answer we are least certain. If we want to understand a person, we should ask them the question to which we are least sure of their answer.
algorithms  books  compression  creativity  creative_renewal  economists  experience_economy  fresh_eyes  habits  holidays  insta-bae  Japan  mybestlife  novelty  non-routine  Slow_Movement  Tim_Harford  travel  unpredictability  vacations  variety 
april 2019 by jerryking
Learn How to Have a Learning Vacation
APRIL 28, 2017 | The New York Times | By SHIVANI VORA

FOLLOW YOUR PASSION The options for what you can learn on your vacation are limitless, and include cooking, photography, art history, farming or a sport such as diving or horseback riding. To get the most out of the trip, Mr. Spence advises choosing something you’re passionate about;

A LITTLE, OR A LOT? With whatever skill you intend to learn, figure out whether you want an immersion or only to occupy a portion of your trip.

CONSIDER YOUR BUDGET No matter the skill, you can learn it by taking a vacation in a wide range of price ranges, and having a clear idea of your budget will help you home in on the right trip.

DON’T FORGET THE CHILDREN
travel  vacations 
may 2017 by jerryking
Harry Yates: The man with the brand - The Globe and Mail
FRED LANGAN
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Jul. 15 2014,
advertising  advertising_agencies  obituaries  Volkswagen  DDB  Avis  brands  Cuba  vacations 
july 2014 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read