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jerryking : variations   4

What kind of jobs do the software engineers who earn $500k per year do? - Quora
If you're a worker in a village who supplies said village with water, you are valuable to its people. There are two types of workers:

Type 1 worker: Grabs an empty bucket or two, goes to the sweet water lake, fills them up, comes back and makes twenty people happy. He gets to drink some of that water along the way, and once he gets back, takes some of the water home.

Type 2 worker: Disregards how much of a "fair share" of water he's getting. Instead of grabbing a bucket, grabs a shovel and a little cup, and disappears for a while. He's digging a stream from the lake towards the village. Often he disappoints people for having returned from weeks of work with an empty cup. But the elders in the village for some reason believe in him and want to keep him (and throw him a bone so that he doesn't starve for a little while). Some day, suddenly he shows up with a constantly flowing stream of water behind his back. He puts the Type 1 workers out of water delivery business. They'll have to go find a different activity and "team" to work with. Type 2 worker, depending on how much control they retained on that stream, get to own a good chunk of it. Because the village wants to acquire and integrate that stream, they compensate the ownership of Type 2 worker in that stream with on par ownership in the village itself, typically land or such.

News media observes the Type 2 worker and his unwillingness to part with his accumulated wealth in return for his added value for the village (often vesting on a schedule, also known as golden handcuffs); and spins it such that it looks as if another village tried to woo that worker but was met with unexpected resistance.

The resulting media impression, in the mind of Type 1 workers, feels like pay inequity (see the video at the bottom). This is because Type 1 workers expect equal rewards for equal time spent being loyal to the same village.
creating_valuable_content  entrepreneurship  mindsets  productivity  productivity_payoffs  Quora  scaling  solutions  solution-finders  software  thinking_big  uncharted_problems  unconventional_thinking  value_creation  variations  wealth_creation 
may 2014 by jerryking
Great Hackers
(Charles Waud & WaudWare. Can Waudware develop on a different platform, enabling 3rd parties to develop for it? Would that make PICs more commercially appealing?)

There's no controversy about which idea is most controversial: the suggestion that variation in wealth might not be as big a problem as we think.

I didn't say in the book that variation in wealth was in itself a good thing. I said in some situations it might be a sign of good things. [JCK: that is,....it might be a "signal"] A throbbing headache is not a good thing, but it can be a sign of a good thing-- for example, that you're recovering consciousness after being hit on the head.

Variation in wealth can be a sign of variation in productivity. (In a society of one, they're identical.) And that is almost certainly a good thing: if your society has no variation in productivity, it's probably not because everyone is Thomas Edison. It's probably because you have no Thomas Edisons.

In a low-tech society you don't see much variation in productivity....In programming, as in many fields, the hard part isn't solving problems, but deciding what problems to solve. Imagination is hard to measure, but in practice it dominates the kind of productivity that's measured in lines of code.

Productivity varies in any field, but there are few in which it varies so much (as software development)..This is an area where managers can make a difference. Like a parent saying to a child, I bet you can't clean up your whole room in ten minutes, a good manager can sometimes redefine a problem as a more interesting one.
coding  discernment  hackers  imagination  income_distribution  income_inequality  Paul_Graham  productivity  productivity_payoffs  programming  signals  software_developers  software_development  Thomas_Edison  variations  WaudWare  worthwhile_problems 
february 2014 by jerryking
Two ‘fired guys’ poured ambition into Steam Whistle - The Globe and Mail
Oct. 03 2013 | The Globe and Mail | WALLACE IMMEN.

Steam Whistle is a case study for entrepreneurs trying to carve a niche in a competitive industry, says Eric Morse, associate dean of the University of Western Ontario’s Richard Ivey School of Business, who oversees the school’s Quantum Shift program for entrepreneurs.

“They figured out what they wanted to be good at early on, and that’s not always an easy thing to do,” Dr. Morse says. “Entrepreneurs are often throwing a bunch of stuff at the wall to see what sticks.”

“Don’t vary until proven necessary,” is another lesson this emphasizes, he says.

It actually takes more focus and dedication to stay successful once you have initial success,
artisan_hobbies_&_crafts  beers  brewers  craftsmanship  dedication  entrepreneur  entrepreneurship  focus  Ivey  partnerships  Steam_Whistle  variations  Wallace_Immen 
october 2013 by jerryking
Gary Hamel Sees “More Options… Fewer Grand Visions”
October 6, 2009 | World Business Forum — Presented by Shell.
"...A second critical principle is variety. As the world becomes more
uncertain, it’s harder to see farther ahead. You can’t make 10- or
20-year strategies. What becomes more important is trying lots of new
things — experimenting in low-cost ways continuously — and seeing what
works and what doesn’t. So more options, more experimentation, fewer
grand visions, fewer strategies would be the second principle."
experimentation  Gary_Hamel  low-cost  optionality  options  variations  variety  uncertainty 
may 2010 by jerryking

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