recentpopularlog in

jerryking : veterans   36

Robert Bundy: Powerful bureaucrat helped shape Toronto - The Globe and Mail
OLIVER MOORE
The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Jun. 08, 2017

Robert Bundy, the powerful Toronto civil servant who oversaw the expansion of the city’s parking system and parks, eventually meeting his match in the stubborn residents of the harbour islands, died of heart failure on May 8 in Toronto. He was 94.

A property developer who had served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War and was decorated twice by Russia for his role in the Murmansk Run supply convoys, Mr. Bundy moved into public service at a time when city bureaucrats enjoyed substantial clout......Early in their marriage, Mr. Bundy joined the city bureaucracy. His construction business had been successful and “he didn’t have to worry about finances,” his son Brock said. “He really truly believed he was doing something to make everyone’s life better, and you can see that all the way through.”

The elder Mr. Bundy became general manager of Toronto’s parking authority in 1958, a time when creating plentiful and cheap parking was seen as crucial to helping the city compete with the suburbs. A 1968 annual report for the agency shows that in his first 10 years in the role the number of municipal off-street parking spaces nearly doubled to 14,440.

In the late 1950s, he also chaired a committee trying to ensure that sufficient development followed the route of Toronto’s east-west subway line. And he pioneered the concept of a business improvement area, which recruits local merchants to help make their surroundings more attractive and marketable.

The importance of abundant parking, however, remained a passion for years. He was co-founder of what would become the International Parking Institute and travelled to learn from his peers across the continent. Decades later, when he was part of a pitch to redevelop Toronto’s Greenwood Raceway, the proposal was built around extensive new parking.

However, he was cognizant of the needs of non-drivers as well. As Metro’s parks commissioner, he oversaw great swaths of new green space. His family said he was particularly proud of Rosetta McClain Gardens in Scarborough, a park specifically designed around the needs of people with disabilities.

During his tenure, the city created bicycle trails in some of its green spaces, routes that proved so popular they led to friction between cyclists and other users
Toronto  cities  parking  WWII  bureaucrats  parks  obituaries  city_hall  property_development  veterans  leaders  Royal_Navy  BIAs  public_spaces  city_builders  civil_servants  redevelopments  green_spaces 
june 2017 by jerryking
The key to winning a dogfight? Focus - The Globe and Mail
HARVEY SCHACHTER
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Sunday, Dec. 14 2014,

Keep your focus: Stay abreast of your field, reading widely and probing for information. His team’s knowledge of how to handle the dire situation they faced, from outwitting the enemy after being hit, to the latest survival training when plunged into the water, kept them alive. “The better informed you are, the better you will be,” he said....to get better you have to debrief after your skirmishes....Do you consistently get the most important things done at work? Your day is jammed with many activities, some important and some minutia. You need to know: If you could only accomplish only one thing, what that would be. Events will arise during the day that require your attention, and you must deal with them. But he notes that we often find ourselves in reactive mode, which can sometimes be misguided. This question addresses the active mode, setting out a plan of what to accomplish for the day...How do you and your teammates prepare for each day’s biggest challenges at work? Top guns have lots of computer displays surrounding them in the cockpit. Because of that complexity, they need a simple plan and to spend time discussing the “what ifs,” so when plans need to be altered, they can manoeuvre effectively. “It’s the same with business people. If you’re surprised, you will have trouble,” he warned.
Vietnam_War  veterans  focus  lessons_learned  U.S._Navy  Harvey_Schachter  feedback  scenario-planning  anticipating  preparation  contingency_planning  debriefs  post-mortems  simplicity  off-plan  priorities  surprises  market_intelligence  beforemath 
december 2014 by jerryking
Warren G. Bennis, Scholar on Leadership, Dies at 89 - NYTimes.com
By GLENN RIFKIN
AUGUST 1, 2014

Professor Bennis believed in the adage that great leaders are not born but made, insisting that “the process of becoming a leader is similar, if not identical, to becoming a fully integrated human being,” he said in an interview in 2009. Both, he said, were grounded in self-discovery.

Leadership requires the communication of passion that gives hope and inspiration to other people. Integrity is imperative, and so too, are curiosity and daring.

The experience of his father being summarily fired taught him about the power of organizations and their impact on lives. “That will never happen to me,” he recalled thinking. “I will never lose my power to affect my own life.”...He saw signs that business leaders in the decades to come, inheriting a diverse and complex global environment, would have a better understanding of the territory in which they lead — what he called “contextual intelligence.”
Warren_Bennis  leadership  scholars  gurus  obituaries  WWII  veterans  academia  contextual_intelligence  integrity  curiosity  daring 
august 2014 by jerryking
For Canada, a victory worth remembrance -
Nov. 11 2013 | The Globe and Mail | J.L. Granatstein.

One great Canadian campaign, however, remains all but unknown. The Hundred Days, that short period running from Aug. 8, 1918, to the armistice on Nov. 11, saw the Canadian Corps score victory after victory against the toughest German defences on the Western Front. The Hundred Days was unquestionably the most decisive campaign ever fought by Canadian troops in battle, and if we remember the losses and pain on Remembrance Day, we should also remember the Canadian triumphs that dramatically shortened the First World War.
nation_building  history  WWI  Canadian  Canada  memorials  commemoration  J.L._Granatstein  veterans  soldiers  WWII  war  historians  Armistice  militaries 
november 2013 by jerryking
War Shifts Canada's Military Expectations - WSJ.com
April 17, 2012 | WSJ | By ALISTAIR MACDONALD.

War Shifts Canada's Military Expectations
After Key Role in Afghanistan, Government Envisions Expanded Presence Overseas, but Also Contends With Budget Cuts..."There is a sense that there has been too much soft power, not enough hard power, and Afghanistan has recalibrated that equation," said Fen Hampson, director of Carleton University and a member of a task force that advised the prime minister's office on Afghanistan's School of International Affairs.

That adjustment came at significant cost. Canada's 158 dead, out of 38,000 people who were deployed to Afghanistan at some point over a decade, represent one of the highest per capita casualty rates in the Western coalition.
Canada  Afghanistan  Stephen_Harper  veterans  expectations  soft_power  hard_power  budget_cuts 
may 2012 by jerryking
Book review: Still Surprised - How an Expert Took the Lead
AUGUST 17, 2010 | Wall Street Journal | By ADRIAN
WOOLDRIDGE. As a guide to leadership, nothing Warren Bennis has learned
at Harvard or MIT topped the lectures he heard at Fort Benning, Ga.

What makes a great leader? What do you do when you first take over? How
do you avoid disaster?
book_reviews  leaders  leadership  memoirs  gurus  Warren_Bennis  books  veterans  surprises  first90days 
august 2010 by jerryking
Underage soldier became Canada's oldest vet
Feb. 19, 2010 | The Globe & Mail | Tom Hawthorn
WWI  veterans  obituaries 
february 2010 by jerryking
An opportunity for all
Feb. 20, 2010 | The Globe and Mail | Editorial
WWI  veterans  editorials 
february 2010 by jerryking
Veteran was the last link to an era that defined Canada -
Feb. 18, 2010 | Globe & Mail | Michael Valpy. Note on the
passing of John Babcock at 109, the last known Canadian veteran of the
First World War – the last of the 650,000 men and women to serve in the
uniforms of their country's armed forces in the conflict of 1914-1918.
WWI  veterans  commemoration  history 
february 2010 by jerryking
Those Who Make Us Say 'Oh!' - WSJ.com
* MAY 23, 2009

Those Who Make Us Say 'Oh!'
A tribute to America's war heroes, past and present.
heroes  Peggy_Noonan  tributes  veterans 
may 2009 by jerryking

Copy this bookmark:





to read