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jerryking : victimhood   16

We need to talk about the boys -
MAY 5, 2018 | The Globe and Mail | MARGARET WENTE.

It’s girls who get all the attention these days. But it’s the boys we should be worried about. Boys lag girls in school at every level. They drop out, get in trouble with the law, and become disconnected from the mainstream – sometimes for good.

Jamil Jivani was heading there himself. He grew up in Brampton, Ont....At age 16, he couldn’t read – or didn’t care enough to. He was convinced the system was rigged against him. His role models were gansta rappers. Police officers gave him a hard time. His dad wasn’t in the picture.....Mr. Jivani is now 30. He is a law professor, a graduate of Yale, and an activist for disadvantaged communities. His personal story is the powerful thread running through his new book, Why Young Men: Rage, Race and the Crisis of Identity......He aims to change the conversation from “either/or” to “and also.” “If you’re trying to change the conditions young men grow up in,” he says, “you need to talk about both law enforcement and families.”

He gets pushback saying things like that. “People are used to hearing a certain kind of narrative – the world is unfair, racist, biased, and the primary concern we should have is that these are systems that oppress us – systemic racism, sexism, and so on. It’s amazing how much this passes as a truth.”

Mr. Jivani believes that we can’t address the crisis of young men without talking about families and culture. For boys, fathers are their first line of defence. Without fathers, they may have no positive role models for how to be a man.

“A lot of people in the black community want to talk about fatherlessness,” he says. But we seldom hear from them. The voices you hear are all from one side, and the media seldom seek out any other perspectives.

People censor themselves too. “..... Black Lives Matter makes things worse. “It’s a style of activism that tries to define people – to tell them this is what you’re supposed to think and do because of your identity.” ....“BLM’s approach to activism focuses on having an enemy that must be defeated,” he writes. “It is accusatory at its core.”
Margaret_Wente  fatherhood  parenting  dysfunction  Black_Lives_Matter  African_Canadians  books  crisis  systemic_discrimination  systemic_racism  lawyers  Osgoode  family_breakdown  values  dropouts  achievement_gaps  Yale  activism  economically_disadvantaged  victimhood 
may 2018 by jerryking
Black Americans Need Bourgeois Norms - WSJ
By Robert L. Woodson
Oct. 11, 2017

This summer, law professors Amy Wax and Larry Alexander caused a stir with an op-ed lamenting the decline of what they called “bourgeois norms.” “All cultures are not equal,” they rightly observed. Those that encourage self-restraint, delayed gratification, marriage and a strong work ethic tend to thrive. Those that tolerate or excuse substance abuse, out-of-wedlock pregnancy and dropping out tend to break down.

Ms. Wax and Mr. Alexander were instantly accused of racism by the growing army of angry academics who police the prevailing narrative of black victimhood. According to this narrative, black progress is determined not by personal choices and individual behavior, but by white supremacy, America’s history of slavery and discrimination, and institutional racism. Touting “bourgeois values” is interpreted as an offense against authentic black culture.......A better life has always been available to those who reject undisciplined and irresponsible behavior, and embrace self-determination and personal responsibility. So-called bourgeois values have always empowered blacks to persevere and overcome bitter oppression. They provided the moral “glue” that held the black community together during the hardest of times.
moral_codes  Amy_Wax  Frederick_Douglass  values  victimhood  African-Americans  self-restraint  delayed_gratification  marriage  work_ethic  personal_responsibility  societal_norms  authenticity  bourgeois  cultural_norms  cultural_values  hard_times 
october 2017 by jerryking
Can-Do Lee Kuan Yew - NYTimes.com
MARCH 23, 2015
Continue reading the main story

Roger Cohen

The measure of that achievement is that the ingredients of disaster abounded in Singapore, a country that is “not supposed to exist and cannot exist,” as Lee said in a 2007 interview with The New York Times. “We don’t have the ingredients of a nation,” he noted, “the elementary factors: a homogeneous population, common language, common culture and common destiny.” Instead, it had a combustible ethnic and religious hodgepodge of Chinese, Malays and Indians gathered in a city-state of no natural resources....The fact that the elements for cataclysm exist does not mean that cataclysm is inevitable. Lee demonstrated this in an age where the general cacophony, and the need to manage and spin every political minute, makes statesmanship ever more elusive. The determining factor is leadership. What defines leadership above all is conviction, discipline in the pursuit of a goal, adaptability in the interest of the general good, and far-sightedness.

Lee’s only religion was pragmatism, of which religion (as generally understood) is the enemy, because, to some adherents, it offers revealed truths that are fact-resistant. Any ideology that abhors facts is problematic. (If you believe land is yours because it was deeded to you in the Bible, for example, but other people live there and have for centuries, you have an issue pregnant with violence.) Lee had one basic yardstick for policy: Does it work? It was the criterion of a forward-looking man for whom history was instructive but not imprisoning. He abhorred victimhood (an excuse for sloppy thinking and nationalist delusion) and corruption. He prized opportunity, meritocracy, the work ethic of the immigrant and education.
authoritarianism  city-states  far-sightedness  leaders  leadership  Lee_Kuan_Yew  nation_builders  obituaries  Roger_Cohen  Singapore  Southeast_Asia  statesmen  tributes  victimhood  work_ethic 
march 2015 by jerryking
Sony needs to stop playing the victim - The Globe and Mail
MIA PEARSON
Special to The Globe and Mail
Published Thursday, Dec. 25 2014

2014 has us [that]...cyber attacks and hacking scandals are now a fact of life.

According to McAfee Labs 2015 Threat Predictions, cyber attacks will grow in frequency and range in 2015, and some experts believe 2015 could be the year a major company goes out of business because it failed to adequately prepare for a cyber attack.

Indeed, how your brand prepares for this new age of corporate cyber-terrorism could define your business....Sony’s real misstep has less to do with its decision to pull – and then subsequently green light – the movie, and more about their lack of leadership in place to handle this kind of situation. The strategy – or rather, lack thereof – conveyed little confidence or resilience to the public....Sony continues to play the victim card, but executives at the company only have themselves to blame for not clearly communicating the reasons for their decisions to the public and holding strong to that strategy.
crisis  crisis_management  data_breaches  hackers  cyberattacks  cyber_security  victimhood  Sony_Pictures  public_relations  Communicating_&_Connecting  threats  missteps  brands  preparation  frequency_and_severity 
december 2014 by jerryking
Speaking Truth With Power - WSJ
By
John Fund
Updated Feb. 14, 2003

a growing number of black officials are breaking ranks by calling for a more honest approach to race relations. The latest is David Clarke, the elected sheriff of Milwaukee County, Wis., who accused other black elected officials of practicing a "cult of victimology" instead of making "real efforts to better the lives of black people." His critics claim that the 46-year-old Democrat is pandering to whites, but his message has struck a chord among voters of all races and could catapult him into higher office.
African-Americans  race_relations  truth-telling  police  victimhood  David_Clarke  speak_truth_to_power 
november 2014 by jerryking
Joseph Epstein: What's Missing in Ferguson, Mo. - WSJ
Aug. 12, 2014 | WSJ | By JOSEPH EPSTEIN.

The black family—the absence of fathers—is the problem. The old dead analyses, the pretty panaceas, are paraded. Yet nothing new is up for discussion. Discussion itself is off the table. Except when Bill Cosby, Thomas Sowell or Shelby Steele and a few others have dared to speak about the pathologies at work—and for doing so, these black figures are castigated.

President Obama, as leader of all the people, is not well positioned for the job of leading the black population that finds itself mired in despond. Someone is needed who commands the respect of his or her people, and the admiration of that vast—I would argue preponderate—number of middle-class whites who understand that progress for blacks means progress for the entire country.

The older generation of civil-rights leaders proved its mettle through physical and moral courage. The enemy was plain—rear-guard segregationists of the old South—and the target was clear: wrongful laws that had to be, and were, rescinded. The morality of the matter was all on these leaders' side. In Little Rock, in Montgomery, in Selma and elsewhere, they put their lives on the line. And they won.

The situation today for a civil-rights leader is not so clear, and in many ways more complex. After the victories half a century ago, civil rights may be a misnomer. Economics and politics and above all culture are now at the heart of the problem. Blacks largely, and inexplicably, remain pledged to a political party whose worn-out ideas have done little for them while claiming much. Slipping off the too-comfortable robes of victimhood is essential, as is discouraging everything in ghetto culture that has dead-end marked all over it.
Ferguson  African-Americans  leaders  leadership  Michael_Brown  '60s  '50s  NAACP  MLK  civil_rights  fatherhood  dysfunction  victimhood  thug_code  family_breakdown 
august 2014 by jerryking
African Guyanese concerns cannot be articulated by a political party parliament
November 12, 2006 | Stabroek News |Dennis Wiggins

"A renaissance is needed but putting it forward as a political strategy may be dangerous"

Mr. F.. Skinner's letter "A renaissance is needed but putting it forward as a political strategy may be dangerous" (11/08/06)

Mr. Phillips in his letter captioned; "The concept of peace was used to attack the African psyche (11/08/06);"
Afro-Guyanese  letters_to_the_editor  ACDA  PNC  politics  strategic_thinking  human_psyche  propaganda  victimhood 
august 2013 by jerryking
First, remember who the real victims were
JULY 14 2005 | G&M | editorial.

Compare the "yes, but" response to what Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian leader, said this week after a suicidebomber killed two Israelis in Netanya, near Tel Aviv, at the very time Israel is withdrawing from Gaza. "This is a crime against the Palestinian people." That is an unequivocal message. It says the terrorists are harming the very people whose interests they claim to defend. It is much more than a pro forma denunciation of terrorism. It's an attempt to expose the terrorists in their own communities, and change the culture that sustains them.
Or compare the "yes, but“ approach to the clear public statements yesterday by the four Muslim MPs in Britain's Parliament. They said the Muslim community must do more than condemn terror; it must confront it. "The message is that we cannot tolerate these people in our midst and, if we have in the past, we have to be stronger," said Mohammed Sarwar, a Labour MP.
editorials  victimhood  Muslims  Islamic 
september 2012 by jerryking
We make our own social programs
Jul. 28 2012 | The Globe and Mail |Craig Christie.

An element of a solution in this article: a parent (or parents) that demonstrated good work ethic and who promotes/instills the importance of education, to their kids. Without that, anything that is undertaken by organisations (government or non-government) will start out the gate with a handicap.
op-ed  Toronto  African_Canadians  responsibility  parenting  social_housing  work_ethic  values  gangs  violence  victimhood  self-help  role_models  self-reliance  self-respect  self-starters  libraries  JCA 
august 2012 by jerryking
America the Beautiful Is Also America the Complicated
December 19, 200| WSJ | George Melloan.

Tocquevillians versus Gramscians where Gramscians see any society, including America, as an arena where the 'marginalized' are necessarily at war with the privileged classes.
demographic_changes  elections  interest_groups  New_York_City  victimhood  class_warfare 
july 2012 by jerryking
Tackling the dangerous ideology of victimhood
Jun 6, 2006 | The Globe and Mail. pg. A.16| Editorial

Muslims are not oppressed worldwide. Forty leading Arab and Muslim intellectuals, including Canadian economist Atif Kubursi, have come out and said so in the past few years in the Arab Human Development Reports done for the United Nations. They have said, for instance, that in the development of knowledge, Arab (usually Islamic) countries lag far behind the West and even the leading countries of the Third World. The faults lie within, they wrote.

The notion that Canadian Muslims are victims is nonsense....In Canada, Muslims do not find themselves living in separate communities as in Britain, where in 17 primary schools, 90 per cent of students are Bangladeshi. They are not living in sprawling suburban ghettos, as in France. Female Muslims are not forbidden to wear the traditional head scarf in public schools, as in France. Schools make enormous accommodations -- barring male lifeguards, for instance, to permit special swimming periods for Muslim girls.
ProQuest  victimhood  Muslim  Canada  ideologies  terrorism  editorials 
october 2011 by jerryking
What Should African-American Studies Students Learn?
October 1, 2009 | The New Republic | by John McWhorter.

This piece is simply a call for a true African-American Studies paradigm: a study of black people entire, with ample room for views from all sides. Black conservatives should be read alongside Du Bois and Baldwin, with no clucking and hedging. Any hovering consensus that leftist positions are “truth” should be a mark of failure.

Here is what I would hope to see in the wake of what I write.

Since I started writing and speaking on race in 2000, it has been typical that when I am invited to speak at a university by an African-American Studies department, often I am expected to yield some time to someone assigned to give a riposte--i.e. speak up for the usual leftist line. That is, the inviters pride themselves on being open-minded enough to hear me out, but consider it the duty of good-thinking folk to provide, shall we say, “balance.”

But then, when “proper”-thinking black writers are invited to speak, there is no sense that their talk is incomplete without a “conservative” person spending fifteen minutes having their say.

African-American Studies departments typically see themselves as doing their jobs in harboring a “controversial” speaker, partly out of a wan gesture towards true intellectual engagement, but equally as much because they know that person will, because of shock value, fill seats.

However, they are not engaged in true exploration, in the intellectual sense, until they can process the “controversial” speaker as simply, and only, a speaker, with one view among many. And, if articulate enough to merit invitation, worthy of engagement without some “right-minded” black faculty member dragged in as a “corrective.”

In an African-American Studies department of the kind I suggest, speakers and teachers of all walks would be permitted--note: not just conservative ones--and students would be able to come to their own conclusions. That is, be educated in the true sense.
African-Americans  John_McWhorter  Colleges_&_Universities  intellectual_diversity  intellectual_exploration  academia  victimhood  students  syllabus  curriculum  black_studies 
october 2009 by jerryking
The Tragedy of Michael Jackson - WSJ.com
JULY 15, 2009 | Wall Street Journal | by BILL WYMAN. Great music, poor life decisions!
Michael_Jackson  reflections  victimhood  music  popular_culture  obituaries  op_ed 
july 2009 by jerryking

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