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jerryking : war   27

The Dead Prussian Podcast
A podcast about war and warfare
podcasts  war  warfare 
july 2019 by jerryking
Chronicle of a war foretold | The Economist
Jun 27th 2015

Ghost Fleet: A Novel of the Next World War.By P.W. Singer and August Cole.Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 404 pages; $28.
war  future  China  China_rising  PACOM  U.S._Navy  books  fiction  book_reviews  U.S.-China_relations 
november 2016 by jerryking
Nationalism and the lessons of World War I, 100 years on - The Globe and Mail
Jun. 29 2014

it should be our species’ fervent wish that we acknowledge two fundamental truths to emerge from the First World War.

The first truth is that the leading powers of the day must be cautious about pulling themselves and their allies into escalating conflicts. There is an element in well-armed countries that, energized by either a thirst for blood or a naiveté about the horrors of its shedding, wants to answer every terrorist attack, act of aggression or perceived threat with military-backed ultimatums. This was Austria-Hungary’s response to the assassination of Franz Ferdinand – it now serves as a reminder that an interconnected world, as ours most definitely was in 1914, can back into Armageddon as easily as march into it. World leaders who resist calls for military action aren’t necessarily showing weakness; they may be showing resolve and wisdom.

The second indelible truth is that nationalism, a product of the age in which the war started, is the single greatest threat to peace.
editorials  assassinations  WWI  war  hard_truths  nationalism  lessons_learned  anniversaries  history  Canada  centenaries  threats  ultimatums 
july 2014 by jerryking
For Canada, a victory worth remembrance -
Nov. 11 2013 | The Globe and Mail | J.L. Granatstein.

One great Canadian campaign, however, remains all but unknown. The Hundred Days, that short period running from Aug. 8, 1918, to the armistice on Nov. 11, saw the Canadian Corps score victory after victory against the toughest German defences on the Western Front. The Hundred Days was unquestionably the most decisive campaign ever fought by Canadian troops in battle, and if we remember the losses and pain on Remembrance Day, we should also remember the Canadian triumphs that dramatically shortened the First World War.
nation_building  history  WWI  Canadian  Canada  memorials  commemoration  J.L._Granatstein  veterans  soldiers  WWII  war  historians  Armistice  militaries 
november 2013 by jerryking
Yossi Klein Halevi: A Lesson From the Yom Kippur War for a Perilous Time - WSJ.com
October 3, 2013 | WSJ | By YOSSI KLEIN HALEVI.
A Lesson From the Yom Kippur War for a Perilous Time
Golda Meir didn't strike pre-emptively in 1973 because she was 'scared' of angering the White House.
security_&_intelligence  Yom_Kippur_War  pre-emption  Israel  lessons_learned  Iran  diplomacy  Mideast_Peace  IDF  Egypt  Syria  war  militaries 
october 2013 by jerryking
Underpricing risky business
February 1, 2013 | G&M report on Business pg B2 |by David Parkinson.

As energy and mining reserves have become increasingly expensive to find in other, more stable parts of the world, Africa's dangers have been glossed over in the quest to cash in on the continent’s still relatively undeveloped resources. Companies have been ignoring the risky reality, and investors have been underpricing it...Africa's significant growth potential has generated optimism, however, the geopolitical risks facing investors in Africa remain, for the most part, underestimated.”
The biggest threat to business in Africa, he argues, is “re1igious/ ideological militancy"--especially from Islamist/jihadist groups - which he says “has been vastly underestimated, and will pose significant risks to foreign investors in much of Africa."
He believes companies and their investors are underpricing the risks of doing business in Aŕrica, including rising security and insurance costs and cant project delays that could come from security threats, military conflicts or regime changes....Until the market starts pricing risk into African resource investments before a crisis forces the realization upon it, there will be little incentive for companies to seek less risky and less corrupt places to put their money.
And there will be more harsh and costly awakenìngs for investors who are themselves willfully blind to the risks.
underpricing  risks  Africa  natural_resources  political_risk  geopolitics  Mali  war  underestimation  frontier_markets  corruption  mining  mispricing  Islamists  jihadis  willful_blindness 
february 2013 by jerryking
Book Review: General Albert C. Wedemeyer - WSJ.com
September 9, 2012 | WSJ | By JONATHAN W. JORDAN.
The Man With a Plan
A warrior who helped lead the Allies to victory armed with charts, graphs and a meticulous attention to detail.

Albert Coady Wedemeyer (1897-1989) was from an upper-middle-class family in Omaha, Neb. Fascinated by European history and the grand strategy of empires as a youth, he was inexorably drawn to the life of a soldier and graduated from West Point in 1919. He foresaw another war with Germany and, in the late 1930s, attended the German army's prestigious general-staff school, the Kriegsakademie. There he learned the art of blitzkrieg alongside his future enemies. He watched Nazi brownshirts strut around Berlin, venting their hatred against Jews. He was in Vienna during the Anschluss, and he saw the Czechoslovakian crisis unfold from the German perspective.

Wedemeyer's report summarizing German tactics and organization brought him to the attention of George C. Marshall, who in 1939 became the Army's chief of staff. Marshall assigned Wedemeyer to the War Plans Division and tasked him with reducing America's mobilization requirements to a single document. In the summer of 1941, in response to a request from Roosevelt, Wedemeyer's team expanded this into a blueprint on how to defeat America's likely enemies in a future war.
1919  book_reviews  WWII  U.S._Army  logistics  generalship  warfare  war  blitzkrieg  military_academies  George_Marshall  mobilization  grand_strategy  '30s  blueprints  detail_oriented  West_Point 
september 2012 by jerryking
In War, Soldiers Die... American casualties are a good sign
American casualties are a good sign. It means the military is doing its job.
Ralph_Peters  war  Afghanistan 
august 2012 by jerryking
Walter Borneman: When the U.S. Declared War on Britain - WSJ.com
June 14, 2012| WSJ |By WALTER R. BORNEMAN

The political fallout from the War of 1812 helps explain why Congress has never again so vigorously exercised the power over war entrenched in the legislative branch.
war  history  United_Kingdom  War_of_1812 
june 2012 by jerryking
Who's falsifying?
12 Dec 2001 | The Globe and Mail A.18. | Ismail Zayid.
It is Ed Morgan (letter -- Dec. 11) and not Rick Sautin who is indulging in falsified history. The homeland of Moshe Dayan and Yitzhak Rabin was not, in June of 1967, "under attack by its surrounding countries." It was Israel that planned and initiated that war against Egypt, Syria and Jordan. Israel's own leaders at the time testify to that, confirming that Gamal Abdel Nasser had no intention of attacking Israel.
ProQuest  Rick_Salutin  1967  Israel  Middle_East  Mideast_Peace  Arab  Six-Day_War  war  conflicts  letters_to_the_editor 
june 2012 by jerryking
A failure in generalship
May 2007 | Armed Forces Journal | By Lt. Col. Paul Yingling.

Prussian military theorist Carl von Clausewitz noted that passion, probability and policy each play their role in war....generals must provide policymakers and the public with a correct estimation of strategic probabilities. The general is responsible for estimating the likelihood of success in applying force to achieve the aims of policy...“Learning to Eat Soup With a Knife,” by John Nagl
leadership  politics  war  warfare  strategy  strategic_thinking  organizational_culture  civilian-military_relations  Prussian  books  Carl_von_Clausewitz  generalship  probabilities  contextual  militaries  policymakers  policymaking 
may 2012 by jerryking
Microdrones, Some as Small as Bugs, Are Poised to Alter War - NYTimes.com
By ELISABETH BUMILLER and THOM SHANKER
June 19, 2011

From blimps to bugs, an explosion in aerial drones is transforming the
way America fights and thinks about its wars. Predator drones, the
Cessna-sized workhorses that have dominated unmanned flight since the
Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, are by now a brand name, known and feared
around the world....Large or small, drones raise questions about the
growing disconnect between the American public and its wars. Military
ethicists concede that drones can turn war into a video game, inflict
civilian casualties and, with no Americans directly at risk, more easily
draw the United States into conflicts. Drones have also created a
crisis of information for analysts on the end of a daily video
deluge.
warfare  drones  DARPA  information_overload  war 
june 2011 by jerryking
The New Machiavelli
October 25 2010 Financial Times Review by Carl Wilkinson who
reviews The New Machiavelli: How to Wield Power in the Modern World, by
Jonathan Powell, Bodley Head RRP£20, 352 pages.
This book, he writes, “is not another memoir of the Blair years”.
Powell’s intriguing and engaging book takes as its foundation The
Prince, Machiavelli’s infamous 16th-century treatise on power. Through
the prism of Machiavelli, Powell explores the heady world of
21st-century political leadership, policymaking and war alongside the
“constructive tension” between Blair and Brown.
DA589.7 .P694 2010 Robarts Stacks 1 copy.
book_reviews  chief_of_staff  Niccolò_Machiavelli  Tony_Blair  power  political_power  leadership  policymaking  war 
march 2011 by jerryking
Book Review: Beetle - WSJ.com
* OCTOBER 23, 2010 By ANTONY BEEVOR. There have been countless
biographies of the generals of World War II, and many are excellent.
This biography of Walter Bedell Smith, Eisenhower's chief of staff, is
one of the best. Smith has never received the attention and the credit
that he deserves. A chief of staff is perhaps bound to be an unsung
hero, but "Beetle" Smith was far more than just a tough and able
administrator. In the words of a fellow officer, he possessed "all the
charm of a rattlesnake." Yet the bad-cop routine—one he used almost
entirely with fellow Americans and not with Allies—was forced upon him
because Eisenhower, his supreme commander, desperately wanted to be
liked by everybody.
book_reviews  WWII  U.S._Army  chief_of_staff  generalship  warfare  war  Dwight_Eisenhower  biographies 
october 2010 by jerryking
Op-Ed Contributor - Lose a General, Win a War - NYTimes.com
June 23, 2010 | New York Times | By THOMAS E. RICKS. FOR
most of the U.S.'s history, the armed services have had a strong and
worthy tradition of firing generals who get out of line....If President
Obama is to be faulted, it is for leaving that group in position after
it became apparent last fall that the men could not work well together.

No policy can be successful if those sent to put it in place undermine
one another with snide comments to reporters and leaked memorandums like
the cable disparaging Mr. Karzai written by Ambassador Karl Eikenberry
last year. For this reason, the president should finish cleaning house
and fire Ambassador Eikenberry and the special envoy, Richard Holbrooke.
Obama  Stanley_McChrystal  U.S._military  U.S._Navy  WWII  leadership  firings  U.S._Army  civilian-military_relations  generalship  warfare  war 
june 2010 by jerryking
How America's Top Military Officer Uses Business to Boost National Security
May 1, 2010 | Fast Company | Jeff Chu. "He wanted to know what
kind of environment can be created in which business can thrive and
what role govts. have to play," "What is it that makes businesses
successful?" What does this have to do with his job or the military's?
"Our financial health is directly related to our national security,"
"The biggest driver globally is the economy ... I need to understand the
global trends that work those engines. Where are these guys putting
their $? If they're betting on certain outcomes -- good or bad -- why?"
Mullen's principles on the use of US military force: don't go it alone;
don't be overweight in foreign policy; closer coordination between
military and civilian agencies. "If his advice were only how to fight
hi-tech wars, and if his solution were just to apply more force, he
would be less relevant," Brent Scowcroft, "He recognizes that the new
face of war is a very complex...part combat, part nation building, and
part hearts and minds."
leadership  U.S._military  JCS  Michael_Mullen  nation_building  ethnography  geopolitics  21st._century  indispensable  storytelling  messaging  generalship  security_&_intelligence  Brent_Scowcroft  strategic_thinking  questions  war  warfare  complexity  curiosity  APNSA 
april 2010 by jerryking
Our New National Divide
Wednesday, September 12, 2007 12:01 A.M. EDT WSJ op-ed by OWEN
WEST America's soldiers are committed to the war. But they're not going
to lie about its progress.
security_&_intelligence  Iraq  inspiration  leadership  war  polarization  USMC 
march 2009 by jerryking
The Six-Day War that will never end
Feb. 10, 2009, G&M op-ed by Tom Segev points out that the
conflict is not merely about land and water and mutual recognition. It
is about national identity. Both the Israelis and the Palestinians
define themselves by the Holy Land – all of it. Any territorial
compromise would force both sides to give up part of their identity.
Israel  Arab  war  1967  conflicts  Six-Day_War 
february 2009 by jerryking

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